OUR BEST FRIENDS

whs-logo

The Sergei Foundation

shelterpet_logo

The Animal Rescue Site

B-more Dog

aldflogo

Pinups for Pitbulls

philadoptables

TFPF_Logo

Mid Atlantic Pug Rescue

Our Pack, Inc.

Maine Coonhound Rescue

Saving Shelter Pets, Inc.

mabb

LD Logo Color

Archive for November 5th, 2008

First pup: Obama to make good on promise

Barack Obama — on top of all the other history he made last night — may have been the first president-elect to mention a dog in his election speech.

“I would not be standing here tonight without the unyielding support of my best friend for the last 16 years, the rock of our family and the love of my life, our nation’s next First Lady, Michelle Obama. Sasha and Malia, I love you both so much, and you have earned the new puppy that’s coming with us to the White House.”

A Discovery Channel blog says the “brief puppy mention may represent the first time that an animal has been referenced in a presidential victory speech. If not, use of the word ‘puppy’ would certainly seem to be a rarity.”

Acknowledging his family’s contributions to his campaign, Obama brought up the promise he’d made earlier to his daughters — to get a dog once the campaign was over — and indicated he planned to make good on it.

The family has said they plan to adopt a shelter or rescue dog.

Joe Biden may be adding a dog to the family as well.

He told reporters traveling with his campaign earlier that his wife had promised him a “big dog” if he got elected, according to Reuters. That promise was made in connection with his presidential campaign, but Biden said his wife later said it would apply to a vice-presidential victory as well.

Jill Biden had taped pictures of different dogs on the back of the seat in front of him on his campaign plane to inspire the candidate as he criss-crossed the country in the final sprint to election day.

Massachusetts voters ban greyhound racing

Massachusetts voters yesterday approved a measure that will ban greyhound racing in the state by 2010.

“This is a victory for everyone in Massachusetts who cares about dogs,” said Christine Dorchak, co-chairwoman of the Committee to Protect Dogs.

The ban, which takes effect in 2010, passed 56 percent to 44 percent, with more than two-thirds of the precincts reporting, according to the Boston Globe:

“The contentious ballot question passed amid emotional ad campaigns by both sides. Proponents used images of sad-eyed greyhounds that they say are caged inhumanely and raced to injury, while opponents put the spotlight on the employees who would be out of work if the ballot passed.”

A similar ballot question was narrowly defeated in 2000, but this time around voters strongly supported the measure, despite track owners’ arguments that the ban would cost jobs at a time of economic hardship.

“We did it. We did it for the dogs,” a victorious Carey Thiel, executive director of Grey2K USA, said at a postelection party of some 60 supporters at Jillian’s Billiards Club. “For 75 years, greyhounds in our state have endured terrible confinement and suffered serious injuries. We’re better than that.”

The Committee to Protect Dogs used data kept by the State Racing Commission since mid-2002 showing injuries to more than 800 greyhounds.

Formed by Grey2K USA, the Humane Society of the United States, and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals-Angell Medical Center, the committee spent nearly $500,000 through Oct. 15, campaign finance reports show, and received about $144,000 in in-kind contributions.

Did the poker game come after supper?

This doggie-style reworking of The Last Supper is an advertisement for OIPA, the Organizzazione Internazionale Protezione Animali (the International Organization for the Protection of Animals).

I’m no art critic, but I’d have to put it right up there with that classic, Dogs Playing Poker.

Only one human appears in the work —  Judas.

The copy, translated, reads: “One of you betrays us 150,000 times every year.”  

Apparently, it’s a reference to the number of dogs euthanized each year in Italy.

Izzy (or isn’t he?) getting surgery

Izzy, the retired Longmont, Colorado police dog in need of surgery, will be getting it — thanks to an outpouring of help from residents in the community and beyond.

A drive started by the local Fraternal Order of Police has raised enough money for the operation — from vets, kennels and individuals, including a resident of Las Vegas who came through with $1,000, said Robin L. Ericson, assistant to the chief of the Longmont Police/Fire Department.

The Flatirons Kennel Club has promised to pay $6,000 to cover the cost of his surgery, board member Love Banghart told 9NEWS. “This dog served the community for nine years,” said Banghart. “Any dog that serves the community for that long is very special.”

Izzy sustained a spinal injury catching an armed kidnapping suspect. Since retiring two years ago, the dog’s condition has gotten so bad it is hard for him to walk.

Ericson said that dental and medical benefits are provided to dogs in the city’s K-9 unit, but that those benefits end at retirement, as she says they do for police officers and other department staff.

“A number of people called and donated,” Ericson told ohmidog! — from money to ramps to help Izzy negotiate stairs. Any extra funds received will go toward future care for Izzy and a fund that will provide financial assistance to other retired police dogs.

Ericson said that Izzy’s vet has offered no guarantee that the surgery will help the 11-year-old dog.

She said it was unfortunate that the department termed the dog “equipment” in media reports — but said that’s the name of the official budget category under which the K-9 unit falls. “We love our dogs, and we understand why public wants to help… The term ‘equipment’ might not have been best choice of words.”