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This Marley went in a different direction

During her nine-year career as a search and rescue dog, Marley sniffed around the rubble left by eight hurricanes, and crawled through the ruins of the World Trade Center, says Tampa, Florida fire rescue Captain Mark Bogush.

In the years they worked as a team, Marley never left Bogush’s side. On Wednesday, when the black lab’s stomach became twisted and distended from a condition known as canine bloat, Bogush never left hers, according to Tampa Bay Online.

“I got 12 excellent years from Marley,” saud Bogush. “The best thing for her was to go to that little puppy palace in the sky.”

Bogush said he spent years steeling himself for the possibility Marley would suffer a fatal injury in a disaster area. Instead, after retiring a few years ago, she fell victim to far more common ailments –like arthritis, hearing loss and, finally, stomach bloat. Vets predicted little possibility that surgery would lead to a full recovery. It was up to Bogush to decide whether to euthanize her.

Bogush recalled the first time he saw her, when she was a 6-month-old puppy, wreaking havoc on the home of her owner. What the owner saw as trouble waiting to happen, Bogush saw as high energy, waiting for an outlet.

She took quickly to search and rescue training and treated the work like a game of hide-and-seek. Searching amidst the rubble of the World Trade Center, Marley was motivated by the idea that if she found trapped people, they would “pop up and play with her,” Bogush said.

Comments

Comment from tsg
Time February 12, 2009 at 10:30 am

According to http://www.globalspan.net – The technical name for bloat is “Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus” (“GDV”). Bloating of the stomach is often related to swallowed air (although food and fluid can also be present). It usually happens when there’s an abnormal accumulation of air, fluid, and/or foam in the stomach (“gastric dilatation”). Stress can be a significant contributing factor also. Bloat can occur with or without “volvulus” (twisting). As the stomach swells, it may rotate 90° to 360°, twisting between its fixed attachments at the esophagus (food tube) and at the duodenum (the upper intestine). The twisting stomach traps air, food, and water in the stomach. The bloated stomach obstructs veins in the abdomen, leading to low blood pressure, shock, and damage to internal organs. The combined effect can quickly kill a dog.

NOTE:What’s not mentioned is that dry food (that takes over 10 hours for a dog’s stomach to digest/pass – with assistance from a lot of water intake) is a major culprit of bloat. Consider, in these large breeds, 10 hours with approx. 2 cups of food and liquid sloshing around…how stretched the stomach lining becomes…add running to the mix. In summary, the reason bloating is only second to cancer is that most dogs eat dry food. Holistic veterinarians are trained on both nutrition and medical management and will often advise against dry feed for several reasons including bloat, to increase canine longevity.
Sounds like Marley earned premium real estate in that puppy palace in the sky.

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