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Puppy mills profiting from sale of seized dogs

State officials in Missouri say they plan to review a practice that allows dogs seized from puppy mills to be auctioned off — with the profits going back to the unfit breeders.

In February, for instance, the state negotiated a settlement with a Verona breeder who didn’t meet state standards. She was instructed to close her kennel. The state then arranged for her dogs to be sold by Southwest Auction Service in Wheaton. All the proceeds, minus state licensing fees, went to the kennel owner.

The state claims that since January, it has transferred more than 1,300 abused and neglected dogs from unlicensed breeders to shelters such as the Humane Society of Missouri in St. Louis. But other dogs are sold at auction to other breeders — a practice critics say is unhealthy and allows bad breeders to profit from the sale of their own confiscated or surrendered dogs.

Missouri Agriculture Director Jon Hagler said the policy is under review, according to an Associated Press article.

Missouri, which has come under fire for being the “puppy mill” capital of America, recently initiated Operation Bark Alert, allowing people to report unlicensed breeders directly to Hagler by e-mail. So far, he has received 100 reports of suspicious breeders that include licensed facilities, he said.

(Photo: Courtesy of The Humane Society of the United States)

Comments

Comment from Anne-n-Spencer
Time April 11, 2009 at 9:53 am

Missouri is kind of a sinister place when it comes to dogs. There are always those dark rumors of a “reverend” of some sort who drives around collecting strays and dogs in yards for later re-sale. The conventional wisdom on Dogster about a year ago was that you have your dog chipped and/or tattooed on the trunk as opposed to an ear or limb. I never was able to learn the truth of all that–but it was Missouri.

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