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Dog of Ebola victim in Dallas moved to “undisclosed location”

pham

Bentley, the Cavalier King Charles spaniel that belongs to Ebola-stricken nurse Nina Pham, won’t be euthanized, according to Dallas officials.

Unlike in Spain, where that country’s first Ebola victim saw her dog killed and incinerated — despite no confirmation that the pet was carrying the virus, despite pleas from his owner, and despite an international outcry — officials in Dallas say they will go to great lengths to ensure that Bentley lives on.

“If that dog has to be the boy in a plastic bubble  … We are going to take good care of that dog,” Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said.

Pham, the first American to contract Ebola while in the U.S., was part of the team that cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian citizen who died of Ebola after traveling to Dallas.

Pham, 26, was reported in stable condition Monday at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, where she works.

Dallas officials haven’t outlined specific plans for her dog, but they’ve confirmed he has been removed from Pham’s apartment and is being kept in isolation at an undisclosed location.

Pham, 26, graduated from Texas Christian University’s nursing program in 2010.

Bentley remained alone in Pham’s apartment through the weekend, and was brought food and water.

On Monday, Dallas Animal Services confirmed that Bentley was safe and posted images on its Facebook page of the operation to move the dog from Pham’s home, NBC reported.

But where Bentley will reside; how much, if any, contact he’ll have with humans and other dogs; and how long his isolation might last are questions public health officials aren’t answering — primarily because they don’t have those answers.

“This was a new twist,” Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings told USA TODAY. He said the dog will be cared for until his owner recovers. “The dog’s very important to the patient and we want it to be safe,” he said.

While there are no documented cases of Ebola spreading to people from dogs, at least one study suggests dogs can get the disease without showing symptoms. Experts say they are uncertain what risk that poses to humans.

Richard Hill, spokesperson for the Dallas’ Office of Emergency Management, said the dog  would be held in isolation from other dogs and people and will likely be monitored for signs of the virus for 21 days, the same period used for people who may have come into contact with the virus.

“Wherever Bentley ends up, whatever [sort of facility] he’ll be in, he’ll be by himself,” he said.

In Spain last week, the Madrid regional government, facing its first case of Ebola, euthanized Excalibur, the mixed breed dog of a nursing assistant diagnosed with the virus.

(Photo: Pham and Bentley, provided by family)