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Archive for May 1st, 2018

Happy ending turned bad, new one needed

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That blind dachshund and his pit bull guide dog we wrote about last week are both back in the Richmond animal shelter after the person who adopted them failed to keep her promise to keep the bonded pair together.

Richmond Animal Care and Control Shelter (RACC) proudly announced last week that the pair — surrendered by an owner who had become homeless — had been adopted together.

But a few days later, the happy story took a turn.

OJ, the blind dachshund, was found separated from his friend, about 100 miles away from where they were adopted in Richmond, WRTV reported.

The pair were originally surrendered when their owner became homeless, according to posts by Richmond Animal Care and Control. A picture of the two animals went viral on social media and they were quickly adopted.

OJ., the elder of the two, relied on Blue Dozer, the pit bull, and they would need to be adopted together, according to the posts.

After releasing the dogs to what they thought was a responsible owner, RACC got a call from the Shenandoah Valley Animal Services Center, reporting that OJ was in their custody after being brought in by someone who claimed to have found him as a stray.

Page Hearn, who runs the rescue group Virginia Paws for Pits in Augusta County, said OJ was found wandering and taken to the shelter, where his microchip was traced back to RACC.

The adopter, Hearn said, declined to take back the blind dog, and declined, at least intitially, to surrender Blue Dozer. Later she agreed to return the pit bull.

In an interview with WWTB, the adopter, identified only as Colleen, said she never intended to keep the dogs separated.

But, she said, OJ bit several people within the first two hours after she brought him home, leading her to ask a friend to temporarily take care of the dachshund.

She said she didn’t know OJ was missing from that friend’s home until the shelter called her.

RACC Director Christie Chipps Peters said in an email that they “are very upset over what has transpired.”

Robin Starr, CEO of Richmond SPCA, noted, “There is no shelter that doesn’t have an adoption not turn out well from time to time because people are not totally predictable.”

(Photo: Blue Dozer and OJ, from RACC Facebook page)