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Archive for 'Muttsblog'

Should a cookie-cutter neighborhood be restricted to cookie-cutter dogs?

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The developer of a neighborhood of modern, look-alike, cookie-cutter homes in Lexington, Ky., apparently wants to also define the breeds of dogs that can live there — or at least stipulate what breeds cannot.

That’s not all that rare nowadays, but the company managing McConnell’s Trace is casting a pretty broad net when it calls for banning 11 breeds of dog it deems “dangerous.”

If you read this website, you already know who I think the dangerous ones are in this scenario.

It’s not the German Shepherds, or the Rottweilers, or the mastiffs, or the Doberman Pinschers, or the pit bulls, or the huskies, or the malamutes, or the chows, or the Great Danes, or the St. Bernards or the Akitas.

It’s the developers, property management companies, and/or homeowner’s associationsthat decide breed bans are necessary to maintain peace, sanctity and low insurance premiums — and then go about enforcing their ill-informed rules with dictatorial zeal.

They are the far bigger threat so society.

In a nation so concerned about everybody’s Constitutional rights, and protecting individual liberties, it’s amazing how much power such groups can exert over how we live, and that they get away with it.

Sometimes it is done by the developers who, rather than just build houses, want to impose a set of rules on the community that will last through perpetuity. They do this by establishing “deed restrictions,” stipulating what a homeowner can and cannot do on the property.

Sometimes it’s property management companies that, while collecting a monthly free from homeowners, also issue edicts. Seeing liability insurance premiums rise, for example, they might decide to ban a breed, or two, or 11, of dog. The latest correspondence I received from mine informed homeowners that any alterations to the way grounds crews have laid down pine needles around their houses (it’s a southern thing) “will not be tolerated.”

Sometimes it’s the homeowner’s association, which generally means its board of directors.

All can tend to become little fiefdoms, dispensing rule after rule, threat after threat, warning after warning. When pressed for answers, when asked for reasons, they get vague about who is responsible for what, and pass the buck.

In the Lexington situation, homeowners in McConnell’s Trace were sent letters by the neighborhood developer detailing a reported change in an existing dog restriction, which previously referred only to unspecified “aggressive breeds.”

At least that’s what Josh McCurn, president of the area’s neighborhood association, told the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Developer Dennis Anderson said Monday that Anderson Communities has been prohibiting the 11 dog breeds since 2006. Deed restrictions signed since then have included the prohibited list of breeds, he said.

“We want a mother and her child to feel safe when walking to the mailbox or hiking on the Town Branch Trail,” Anderson said in an email. “We want McConnell’s Trace to be the safest place to raise a family.”

Anderson sent the Herald-Leader a copy of deed restrictions dated in 2006 that lists the 11 restricted breeds.

The letter sent out last week to homeowners, however, stated “restrictions are now amended to include a complete list of prohibited breeds.”

Some homeowners said they never were provided a copy of deed restrictions when they moved in. One said, though he bought his home just over a year ago, he received the 2001 list of deed restrictions.

So it’s entirely possible, given how these places operate, that the developer’s attorney was the only one who actually had a copy of these restrictions he says have been in place for more than 10 years.

The letter said homeowners who already have a dog that belongs to one of the listed breeds can keep their dog.

“Please note, however, that all future pets must meet the breed requirements.”

Residents in the neighborhood organized an emergency meeting for 6:30 p.m. Friday to discuss the restrictions. It will be held at Masterson Station Park shelter #3 and will be open to the public.

Given the meeting is being held outside the neighborhood, I’m assuming dogs of all breeds are welcome.

Diller: The avocado-eating dog that helps propagate the species

avocadodogWhen it comes to avocados, Diller is a dog who doesn’t just crave the fleshy green fruit, but seems to have an abiding respect for the pit as well.

Diller was born to the litter of a pregnant rescue dog and taken in by a family that was moving to a horse ranch in Southern California.

Roaming the grounds there, he quickly discovered a couple of abandoned avocado trees that remained from an old orchard that used to be a few hundred feet from the house.

He tried one. He liked it. And he’s been picking them off the trees and eating them ever since.

We’ll point out here that giving your dog an entire avocado is not a good idea. They are not toxic to dogs, but the pits can be a choking hazard

avodogtwoDiller, though is a meticulous eater, according to a recent story in The Dodo. He never bites into the pit, but he does lick them so clean that they shine.

“One day I came home from work and there were two perfectly clean avocado pits sitting at the foot of my chair. They seriously looked like they had been polished,” said Diller’s owner Robert Moser. “I was sitting there wondering, ‘What the heck?’, when Diller sauntered in with the third, gently placed it on my shoe, and wagged his tail, clearly expecting pets for being a very good boy.”

Moser had tried sprouting avocados from pits before, but never with success.

“Pits that had been whacked out of the avocado with a knife were usually too scuffed up, and if you tried to grow them with the brown seed skin still on, they’d usually rot,” Moser said. “With that in mind, I knew what I had to try the moment I saw the clean pits laid at my feet.”

Almost all of the seeds Diller brought him have sprouted, and Diller ended up with more avocado saplings than he knew what to do with.

avothreeNow he regularly gives them as gifts (accompanied by a photo of Diller with the seed the plant sprouted from) and trades them with other farmers.

“There are probably a few dozen Diller-trees throughout California nowadays, Moser said.

“The earliest of Diller’s trees are just starting to bear fruit. I know the folks that have them will think of him every time they harvest. It’s the sort of thought that makes you smile when it crosses your mind, you know?”

(Photos: From The Dodo; provided by Robert Moser)

Smucker Co. buys Rachel Ray dog foods

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The nation’s most beloved maker of jams and jellies is buying up the pet food company that carries the name of the nation’s most beloved TV cook.

J.M. Smucker Co. has agreed to pay $1.9 billion to buy Ainsworth Pet Nutrition, which makes primarily the Rachel Ray brand dog Nutrish.

The acquisition is the latest pet food line taken over by Smucker, which also owns Kibbles n’ Bits, Meow Mix, Gravy Train, Skippy and Ol’ Roy brands.

By putting more emphasis on pet food — specifically so-called “premium” pet foods — the company hope to invigorate sales, which have been sluggish for consumer goods aimed at humans.

The purchase comes on the heels of recent recalls for some of Smucker’s canned dog food brands — Gravy Train, Skippy, Ol’ Roy and Kibbles ‘N Bits.

Traces of the euthanasia drug pentobarbital found in some cans led to the recall.

smuckersSmucker first got into the pet business in 2015 with a $5.8 billion acquisition of Big Heart Pet Brands, according to Bloomberg. The company, best known for its namesake jam, also produces Folgers coffee and Jif peanut butter.

With the purchase of Nutrish, pet foods will become Smucker’s larges source of sales.

The company is also looking at selling off some of its human food products, including the Pillsbury line of baked goods.

It is focusing more on premium pet foods. High-end pet food has surged 33 percent industrywide over the past five years and now accounts for more than 50 percent of the market.

Smucker generates about 85 percent of its revenue in the U.S. and the acquisition of Ainsworth will make pet food its largest business unit, accounting for about $3 billion in sales.

Smucker is the latest food company to tap into the upscale pet market. General Mills Inc., mired in a three-year sales slump, agreed in February to buy Blue Buffalo Pet Products Inc. for about $8 billion.

Are there too many dogs on the Internet?

image001Depictions of dogs, as any one who has ever read the wall of a prehistoric cave knows, date back to well before ancient times.

Pharaohs commissioned artworks of their favorite pets. Portrayals of hunting and images of medieval banquets often featured dogs in the background or foreground. In the Victorian-era, aristocrats hired painters to make portraits of themselves and their pooches.

As the 20th Century dawned, as humans came to live ever closer to the species, artists seized upon the idea of depicting dogs dressed in human attire and doing human things, bringing us such classes artworks as the inimitable (but often imitated) work, Dogs Playing Poker.

Well before photography went digital, before somebody flicked that World Wide Web switch on, dog depictions were being shared — if not as instantly, often, ridiculously and (often) demaningly as they are today on the Internet, and social media in particular.

Even in my earliest days in journalism, back in the 1970’s, I remember some newspapers had a pet writer — someone who penned a pet column, usually weekly. He or she was commonly an older person who performed mostly clerical duties, maybe a secretary for some top editor, who, due to his or her love for dogs, had volunteered for the task, likely at no increase in pay.

He or she would probably feature a dog in need of adoption every week, or write about pet care and training, or simply ask readers to submit photos of their pets for publication — an opportunity many readers seized, sending actual photos through actual mail.

One of the differences between then and now — a time when many a website is telling you how much they would like to see photos of your dog — is that the old clerk/pet writer’s request for photos was more than likely at least partly sincere.

pokerThose folks who want to see your dog’s photo now? Almost always, they are after something else. You can trust them about as much as the bulldog sneaking an ace to his friend in that painting to the left there.

Pet food websites, pet toy websites, even (we hate to admit it) pet news websites will commonly beg you for a photo of your pooch — not because anyone actually wants to see it, but because they want to get you on their email lists, get you “registered,” introduce you to their products and enlist your loyalty.

They want, more than anything, your money, and like many other businesses that want your money, they will gladly deceive you and try to capitalize on your love for/pride in your pet:

“We’d love to see a photo of your dog!”

Yeah, right.

I’m not here today to say that there are too many dogs on the Internet — even if never before in the history of man have we been so saturated with dog photos and images. The more the merrier, I say.

But I would argue there is too much dog exploitation and too much dog ridicule on the Internet, much of it carried out via those “adorable” photos of your “fur baby” — sometimes by profit-making concerns, sometimes by dog owners themselves.

Compare and contrast, if you will, our old, likely unpaid, pet columnist with someone like Matt Nelson, who is making a six figure annual salary by posting photos sent in by readers, along with a comment and a numerical rating (based on the dog, not the photo) at @dog_rates.

He is not taking any photos. He is not buying any photos. He’s really not doing much work at all, other than accumulating followers. He is merely sharing other people’s photos on Twitter — and managing to make a handsome living from it.

Nelson — profiled by Money magazine recently — dropped out of college once he saw how popular his dog photo sharing Twitter page had become:

There, WeRateDogs’ operations are relatively simple. Nelson estimates he runs 95 percent of things from his iPhone (which, yes, he confirms, does require a massive data plan to handle all the dog photos). He has two remote employees: Ricci, who culls submissions down to about 20 each day, and Tyler Macke, who manages the WeRateDogs online store. His dad, an executive director of a law firm, advises him on finances.

Nelson says he brings in “a low five figures” every month. At minimum, that puts him over $100,000 a year.

Thanks, Money magazine, for doing the math for us.

While Nelson may not be doing much original or creative work, at least his pursuit is mostly cute and kind and well meaning.

20151016_181413-e1522168748576Other dog photo sharing websites are more distasteful to me — dogshaming.com, in particular.

It features photos of dogs who have misbehaved, along with hand-made signs — all submitted by readers.

But perhaps most troubling of all are the photos and videos that individuals post to their Facebook page showing their dogs doing distinctly human things.

Alexandra Horowitz, the author and researcher who has spent her career seriously studying and trying to understand dogs — despite what seems to be society’s preference to see them as dress-up dolls, movie characters with human voices, or (apologies to those who use the term) “fur babies” — made note of the phenomena in last week’s New York Times Opinion section.

In it, she asked the question:

“Why can’t I stand to look at one more photo of a ‘funny dog?'”

She continued, “In a typical image, the dog is posed in a distinctly person-like way, as if on the phone, seated at a table or wearing headphones and dressed up in human attire — glasses, a dog-size suit and tie, even pantyhose.”

” … These dogs are but furry emoji: stand ins for emotions and sentiment. Each representation diminishes this complex, impressive creature to an object of our most banal imagination,” Horowitz wrote. “Such treatment may not be mortifying to the dog, perhaps … but it is degrading to the species.”

Only the most extreme examples of making our dogs look ridiculous receive any sort of backlash — primarily from people who see the pet as being abused. Like this one on Twitter. Go to the link and read all the comments and you almost think, maybe people are coming to their senses.

It bugs me that society is this way — that it took a species, molded it to its liking, and continually foists its own likeness and peculiarities upon it. It bugs me what people will put their dog through to achieve a Facebook post or Halloween costume that makes their friends laugh. It bothers me that some people are getting rich off it.

It’s like we were blessed with an original Mona Lisa, and 85 percent of us want to draw a mustache on it slap it on their own personal billboard.

Somebody needs to grow up, and it’s not the dogs.

(Photos: At top, The Feast of Dives, about 1510–20, Master of James IV of Scotland, the J. Paul Getty Museum); lower, one of the many reproductions of Dogs Playing Poker, by Cassius Marcellus Coolidge, other photos via Twitter)

Tiny Texas town’s barbecue eating dog, Jake, passes away on Easter

The Circle H Bar-B-Q & Grill in the tiny east Texas town of Emory has lost its best non-paying customer.

Like clockwork, an elderly yellow Lab named Jake would show up daily at the restaurant’s drive-thru window, take a seat and patiently wait for handouts.

Why? Because it was convenient for one thing. Jake lived at an auto repair shop right next door. Plus, he just flat out loved barbecue.

jake“Everybody else does too, he just gets his for free,” said Tyson Thompson, a waiter at Circle H.

“Everybody knows Jake,” said Josh Hines, the man who provided Jake with all his favorite food at the drive-thru. “He’s definitely the town mascot.”

He may have gotten all sorts of treats from customers, but Hines knew to provide him only with rib bones,according to EastTexasMatters.com.

“He loves the rib bones … I think that’s all he’s allowed to have cause all of the other stuff is bad for him,” said Thompson.

Jake would station himself just underneath the drive thru window and take a seat. When a customer pulled up, he would limp out of the way, resuming his position as soon as the car pulled out.

Jake’s owners operate Parmer’s Automotive, where he serves as shop mascot too.

jake2“Everyone loves Jake. In the parking lots, they’ll come up and pet him, they’ll just talk to him and give him treats. One person even bought him a whole sandwich,” said Keldon Parmer, the son of the auto shop’s operator.

After downing some barbecue, Jake would traipse back to the auto shop and wash it down with some toilet water before climbing into the back of a truck bed for his nap.

The Parmers say Jake died on Easter, at age 13. He’d been diagnosed with cancer in January. Surgery was performed, KXAN reported, but he was diagnosed with only months to live.

New animated film tells story of Stubby, the most decorated dog of World War 1

The story of Stubby, a stray dog who was sneaked into Europe by U.S. soldiers and went on to become the most decorated dog of World War I, will be told in a new animated film being released this month.

Stubby was in the trenches during 17 battles, where he was injured in a gas attack and later used his keen nose to give troops early warning of chemical shellings. He even had his own custom-made gas mask.

He has been described as everything from a pit bull to a Boston terrier, but his heroics have never been disputed.

A new film, “Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero” opens April 13, according to the Associated Press

Stubby was found on the Yale campus.

He was adopted in 1917 J. Robert Conroy, of New Britain, while he was training in New Haven.

When Conroy shipped out to France, Stubby was smuggled aboard the USS Minnesota in an overcoat.

He became the mascot of the 102nd Regiment by charming officers with his ability to salute, a trick which Conroy taught him.

He also would stand by injured soldiers on the battlefield and alert medics by barking. He was credited with capturing a German soldier he discovered behind the Allied lines, biting him on the rear end and holding on until help arrived.

“What I think meant the most to my grandfather is that Stubby took some of the edge off what was a horrific war,” said Conroy’s grandson, Curt Deane. “There was just an absolute comfort that soldiers got from seeing him. He was, in fact, the first service dog.”

stubbyAfter he returned from the war, Stubby became famous and toured the country. He posed for photos with celebrities and veterans and met three presidents, Deane said.

Stubby died in 1926. His hide was placed over a plaster cast and is on display at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington D.C.

Director Richard Lanni says he tried to be as authentic as possible when telling the story of Stubby.

The filmmakers have partnered with Humane Society of the United States and approximately 90 other regional and national animal organizations to help promote the adoption of stray dogs.

The film features the voices of Logan Lerman, Helena Bonham Carter and Gerard Depardieu.

(Photos: Stubby in an April, 1919 homecoming parade for World War I veterans in Hartford, courtesy Connecticut State Library, via AP)

Best available fare? For this Coast Guard officer’s mastiff, it’s $31,000

A U.S. Coast Guard officer serving in Japan says the best rate she can get to fly her English mastiff back to the states is $31,000.

Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer McKay, a liaison to U.S. Forces Japan at Yokota in western Tokyo, paid $3,200 to bring her 220-pound dog, George Jefferson, to Japan two years ago.

But with United Airlines having temporarily suspended shipping dogs in the cargo hold, McKay has few other options — and they are all expensive, Stars and Stripes reported.

United suspended its pet transportation service last week after three dogs were sent to incorrect destinations — including one dog that was sent to Japan instead of Kansas. A fourth dog died after its owner placed it in an overhead bin during a flight from Houston to New York.

While the airline is honoring existing reservations it is not accepting new ones for dogs traveling as cargo. The suspension does not effect dogs traveling in the cabin.

“I am a single-parent service member just trying to get home to the U.S. with my dog and my son,” said McKay, who’s headed for a new assignment in Washington, D.C., in June. She had hoped to fly to Texas with her dog and pick up a car she stored there.

She’s hoping United reinstates its travel program as scheduled, on May 1.

“The alternative options to do this are financially unreasonable — but my dog is my family and I won’t leave him behind,” she said.

The suspension has also stranded military-owned pets on Guam, as United was the only airline operating in the U.S. territory that permitted pet transport to and from the mainland.

Other options exist for shipping pets from Japan — but when it comes to large animals they can be expensive and inconvenient. Only United and All Nippon Airways offer direct flights from Tokyo to Houston, McKay said.

ANA told McKay that because of the size of George’s carrier, they would have to charge extra — about $31,000.

An Air Mobility Command flight — the usual way for military pet owners to transport their animals to and from Japan — isn’t an option. The command sets a maximum weight of 150 pounds, including the pet’s carrier, and only travels to Seattle.

Many airlines, such as Japan Airlines, Delta, American, Alaskan, Cathay Pacific, EVA Air, Singapore Air and Air Canada, refuse to carry English mastiffs outright, McKay said.