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Tag: adopted

Dog, cat and rat leave shelter together

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A dog, cat and rat who were surrendered together to a Wisconsin shelter have been adopted — as a team.

The threesome was brought to the Oshkosh Area Humane Society by a family who said it was no longer able to care for the pets.

They pointed out at the time that Sasha the dog, Jack the cat and Tweaks the rat were very bonded to each other and, ideally, should be adopted together.

Shelter staff found that out for themselves when the three were separated for their first night at the shelter, pending evaluations.

“It was immediately obvious to us that Jack was extremely unhappy. A staff member had the idea of putting the dog back with Jack to see if it’d have a positive impact,” said admissions manager Cari Tetzlaff.

“As soon as Sasha was in the room, Jack perked up. We were able to touch him for the first time. He instantly felt more comfortable,” she added.

Jack became even more comfortable when Tweaks (the rat) was placed in the room.

From that point on, the group — known as the Rat Pack — was allowed to stay together as they waited for adoption.

dogcatrat2“We’re very grateful to their new family for adopting them so they can start a new chapter in their lives – together!” the Oshkosh Humane Society said in a Facebook post. “Congratulations to this special trio and their family!”

The adoptive owner was initially hesitant to adopt the rat, but quickly changed her mind after seeing the bond they shared.

(Photos: Oshkosh Area Humane Society Facebook page)

Abused dog finds three-year-old girl neglected and naked in woods of Michigan

peanutAn abused dog who ended up in a shelter and was adopted last year led her new owner to a three-year-old girl found naked and shivering in the woods behind their home.

Peanut’s owners said the dog “started going crazy” while inside the house, barking and running up and down the stairs. When they let her out, she barreled into the woods, with her owner following.

She ran straight to the little girl, who was curled up in a ditch.

The dog owner wrapped the girl in a sweatshirt, brought her back to his house and called 911.

The girl was rescued around 11:15 a.m. Friday, near Rapid River in the Upper Peninsula’s Delta County, Mlive reported.

Delta County sheriff’s deputies said temperatures were hovering around freezing when the naked girl was found. Officers found the girl’s parents after going door-to-door.

They described the home as “unsafe and unsanitary,” and called Child Protective Services workers to take custody of the girl and another young girl in the home.

Prosecutors are reviewing what charges might be filed in the case.

One of Peanut’s owners said the girl was quiet as they awaited the arrival of police and the ambulance.

“The little girl could only say one thing — ‘doggie,'” she wrote in a post to the Facebook page of the shelter they adopted Peanut from.

Once named Petunia, the dog was brought to the Delta Animal Shelter last April with two broken legs and broken ribs.

The former owner was recently convicted of animal abuse, the shelter said.

“Petunia has a great new home with a wonderful family….and this formerly abused dog has now saved the life of a little girl,” the shelter wrote.

(Photo: Delta Animal Shelter)

Bolivian monks are exultant about their order’s newest member

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Monks in the Franciscan monastery of Cochabamba, Bolivia, are being anything but silent about the newest member of their order — a schnauzer named Carmelo.

Since the arrival of Carmelo — or, to use his formal name and title, Friar Bigotón (Spanish for mustache) — they’ve plastered his mug all over Facebook, where the proud papas are singing his praises nearly daily.

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Before they took him in, Friar Bigotón lived as a stray. They adopted him through a local animal rescue group, Proyecto Narices Frías, or Cold Nose Project.

Now he romps around the monastery, sometimes in the monk’s robe custom tailored for him.

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“His life is all about playing and running,” Friar Jorge Fernandez told The Dodo. “Here, all of the brothers love him very much. He is a creature of God.”

carmelofishThe monastery’s Facebook page is laden with photos — and there are some pretty delightful ones — of the new dog.

“Brother Carmelo preaching to the fish,” reads the caption under one.

Friar Bigotón’s biggest role is in helping other pups like him, the monks say.

“If only all the churches of our country adopt a dog and care for him like Friar Bigotón,” the group wrote in a post on Facebook, “we are sure that the parishioners would follow his example.”

(Photos: Kasper Mariusz Kaproń / Facebook)

The proper care and feeding of Rhino

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Rhino — the dog who was reluctantly surrendered to the Humane Society of Utah along with a 15-page instruction manual written by an eight-year-old family member — has moved on to a new home.

Rhino, a boxer, was returned to the shelter earlier this month with a small spiral notebook attached to his neck.

The family explained he was too rambunctious and they were worried about their youngest child.

The owner’s manual he was returned with was written by their older daughter.

book2Its handwritten pages were filled with advice aimed at whoever became his new owner, like “His cheeks make lots of slobber,” “He likes sleeping under blankets,” and “Please take him on two to three runs a day. The more he gets out the more he is well behaved in the house.”

Reading between the lines of swirly script, it’s clear that parting with Rhino wasn’t easy for her.

book1She referred to the brindle boxer as a “striped dream” and “an amazing puppy,” and asked, “Please tell Rhino that I love him and miss him every night.”

Rhino went home last week with a new owner, who took the time to study the notebook, including the advice that “His full name is Rhino Lightening then your last name.”

Rhino was adopted by Melanie Hill, who has another dog and plenty of land to romp on.

She told FOX 13 she’ll be taking the spiral notebook home with her too, and will follow all the instructions and stay in touch with Rhino’s previous family.

book3“I will take care of your puppy and love him, just like you did,” Hill said. “He’ll be able to run and play and be spoiled rotten, but mostly he’ll be loved.”

Hill said she already has a connection with Rhino. She was put up for adoption by her mother. “She dropped me off at an orphanage,” she told FOX 13.

She said she a saw story on TV about the dog and the notebook, and decided she had to meet him.

“That just broke my heart. I just kept replaying it on the DVR over and over again and I was like I want this dog. Instantly I fell in love with him.”

(Photo: Humane Society of Utah)

Magdalene comes back … as Dixie

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I was visiting the Forsyth Humane Society yesterday when word came back to the administrative offices that “Magdalene was back for a visit.”

Everyone rushed out to the lobby to see the dog who, before she was adopted about four months ago, had become a staff favorite (at least among those who admit to having a favorite).

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The name rang a bell, and when I saw her I remembered that I was among those she had impressed — to the point where I was considering adopting her.

About the time I became the humane society’s volunteer archivist, Magdalene had entered the shelter. And I — who took the position partly so I could visit dogs — must have gone back to see her four or five times, each time leaning a little closer to taking the big step.

DSC06165She is half white, half black, with each side of her face having seemingly chosen a completely different color, and ears that somehow couldn’t decide and came out speckled.

Big and gangly, she’s a classic mutt, who, while playful, seems to have the peaceful temperament that often goes along with a mix.

Alas, I (as I’ve done once or twice before in life) spent too much time thinking about it.

My dog, Ace, died last spring, and by the time fall came around, I was just about there, but apparently not quite.

One day, Magdalene wasn’t around anymore.

I adopted my new dog, Jinjja, about a month later from the Watauga Humane Society.

Magdalene went home with Amber Fuller, of Mocksville, who renamed her Dixie and, judging from her Facebook posts, couldn’t be happier about the dog she ended up with.

She was visiting Winston-Salem with Dixie yesterday and stopped by the shelter, where the staff seemed thrilled for a chance to see her again. And vice versa.

DSC06135 (2)She greeted everyone, curled up under the feet of the front desk receptionist for a while, and gladly submitted to some belly rubbing.

Fuller reports Dixie is doing great. If the video below is any indication– the humane society posted it on its Facebook page — Dixie is pretty relaxed in her new setting.

Returning from an exotic locale? Chances are you can bring someone home with you

wapo2We don’t expect Donald Trump to like this (so don’t anyone let him know) but if you’re returning from a trip to some exotic locale — Mexico, Thailand, South Korea, India, Turkey, Colombia, and the Carribean to name a few — you can bring someone back with you to live in the good old USA forever.

And you don’t even have to marry them — or even ever see them again.

Yes, we’re talking about dogs. (Aren’t we almost always?)

But we’re also talking about an easy-lifting way to accomplish a good deed and play a small role in making a dog and a family happy.

Our country’s incoming new leadership may no longer wants those tired, poor and hungry humans we once welcomed from other countries, but the door is still pretty open for dogs (my dog included) that have been saved from horrific conditions in other countries.

Many of them have gotten here thanks to Americans returning from vacations, who are willing to take a little extra time to serve as their official escorts.

How it all works was documented recently by The Washington Post, in a story by Andrea Sachs, who not only talked to people who have done it, but did it herself.

Sachs recently returned from a trip to Colombia with a dog named Max.

“To unknowing eyes, I was just a typical traveler with a strong pet attachment. But in truth I was a flight volunteer for Cartagena Paws, an animal-rescue center that, among myriad services, places Colombian street dogs with adoptive families in North America. My ultimate responsibility was to escort the 8-month-old puppy with the overactive tail to the District. I was headed north anyway, and, well, Max needed a lift.”

There are animal welfare groups around the world rescuing dogs who face bleak lives, or worse, and then finding themselves hard-pressed to find them homes.

One solution they’ve turned to is exporting rescued dogs to the U.S.

Often, though, they need a little help getting them from there to here.

“We use flight volunteers who are met at the airport by the adoptive parents,” said Lisa Anne Ramirez, executive director of the Humane Society of Cozumel Island in Mexico. Those meetings, she says are “usually very emotional and tearful.”

While most airlines will ship a dog traveling solo in their cargo holds, that’s the most expensive and least desirable method.

Dogs are generally permitted to travel as checked baggage, or as carry-ons in the cabin, but in those cases they must be traveling with someone.

The rescue organizations handle the paperwork, so, for the escort, it’s often just a matter of handing those papers over at customs.

Sasithorn “Sas” Moy of Harlem said little inconvenience was involved after she agreed to escort five dogs from Thailand to the U.S. when returning from a trip to visit family.

She contacted the Phuket-based Soi Dog Foundation, which sends at least 25 dogs to North America a month.

“I just showed up at the airport and they gave me the paperwork,” she explained after a nearly 20-hour flight to John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. “I said goodbye to the dogs at the X-ray machine. It was painless… There was extra time on the front end and the back end, but it was worthwhile.”

wapo1Sachs advises in the article that travelers wishing to serve as flight volunteers contact the rescue center as soon as they secure their flights.

“I messaged Cartagena Paws two weeks before my departure and received a reply peppered with exclamation points: We would love to have some help! Yes please!”

She and Max flew from Cartagena to Atlanta to Washington — he making the trip next to her in a carrier in the cabin. In Washington, he was picked up for a trip to his new home in Texas.

Sachs also put together a list of international rescues seeking escorts for dogs coming into the United States. You can find more details and contact information at that link.

(Photos: Max arrives in Washington from Cartagena, Columbia, and waits to make the trip to his forever home in San Antonio; volunteers at Cartagena Paws say goodbye to Max at the airport in Cartagena; by Andrea Sachs /The Washington Post)

When Jinjja met Roscoe, and the family heirloom that keeps on giving

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Jinjja met Roscoe this week, and it was a mostly peaceful exchange.

In what was his first real outing since learning to jump in the car by himself, with help from a family heirloom, Jinjja had his first meeting with my brother’s dog at Winston-Salem’s Leinbach Park — neutral ground as neither had been there before.

They touched noses, sniffed each other out, and did well together — at least for the first 30 minutes.

dsc05619-2So far, despite his unusual background — Jinjja was rescued from a farm in South Korea where dogs were being raised for slaughter — he has gotten along with every dog he has met, from the flirtatious basset hound who lives across the street to rambunctious poodle (one of five) who live next door.

We haven’t tried a real dog park yet, but I think he is ready for that. (And I almost am.)

Leinbach Park is semi dog friendly. Leashed dogs are allowed in the park. But dogs, leashed or unleashed, are not allowed on the hiking trail.

“Dogs are not allowed on the sandstone walking trail at any time. The reason should be obvious,” the city’s director of Parks and Recreation told the local paper a couple of years ago.

(Sorry, but the reason isn’t obvious to me.)

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Still, we mostly heeded the warning, staying to the side of the path as much as possible, Jinjja sniffing for squirrels and Roscoe barking without provocation, which he’s prone to doing.

It wasn’t until we stopped walking and took a seat on a bench that, for no apparent reason, there were snarls and growls exchanged, followed by another brief confrontation. There was no real contact, and they seemed to make up afterwards.

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Ace (my previous dog) and Roscoe never became the best of friends. They reached a certain detente after a confrontation that also seemed to have erupted out of nowhere, and left both a little bloody.

On the way back to our cars Jinjja and Roscoe got along fine. I was a little worried about getting him back in my Jeep. I was advised by shelter he came from that it wasn’t a good idea to try to move his body or pick him up. Even though he has almost totally let down his defenses with me, I still haven’t tried to lift him up yet.

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Instead, to get him loaded, I used an ottoman from my living room, which my mother passed on to me. It has a cushion that was embroidered by a great aunt we all called “Tan.” When I back my car up to curb, the ottoman, along with a dangled piece of bologna, makes it easy for Jinjja to step up and jump in.

This was our first time without a curb. He hesitated a bit, but on the third try, just as the bologna ran out, he went for it, back paws getting a good grip on the carpet-like embroidery, and made it.

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I’ve been leaving the footstool in my car, until I buy some kind of sturdy box to replace it.

(That will probably be about the time he realizes he doesn’t even need it.)

I still have Ace’s old ramp, but it’s pretty cumbersome, and Jinjja might resist climbing up it even more than he has jumping in.

Once Jinjja masters the leap into the back seat — with or without a step up — the footstool will return to the inside of the house, and I will continue to prop my own feet up on it, even if it is a work of art.

“No feet on the footstool” would be a stupid rule, much like “no dogs on the trail.”

tanTan, whose real name was Kathleen Hall, was a teacher for many years and later a principal. There’s a school nearby that is named after her. She died in 1983. But I’m guessing what she shared with students lives on in them, their children and their children’s children.

The same can be said of her embroidered footstool, which is helping a South Korean dog who had no future hop into a car and see a little more of the world.

It’s one of those gifts that keep on giving.