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Tag: allowing

Hooray for Hollywood (Florida, that is)

 

City officials in Hollywood (the one in Florida) are considering overturning a ban on dogs along the city’s oceanside Broadwalk (that’s not a typo, that’s what they call it).

Under a proposal from Commissioner Patty Asseff, dogs could be allowed to walk on the two-mile-long promenade — and even eat in beachside cafes.

What’s behind the possible change in policy? Clue: It starts with M and ends with Y. Some city officials see it as a way to bring more business to the shops and restaurants by the sea, according to the Sun-Sentinel.

Three years ago, the city experimented with allowing dogs on the beach between Pershing and Custer streets during certain hours for a few hours a day. The experiment was such a success that it became permanent. As for the Broadwalk, though, dogs — unlike bicycles, roller skaters and rollerbladers — are banned.

Asseff announced her Broadwalk proposal at a town hall meeting last month as a way to compete with other cities that already allow dogs on the beach and to dine at beachside restaurants. The proposal is scheduled to be discussed at the April 21st city commission meeting.

Don’t hit the Broadwalk just yet, though. A $50 fine for strolling down the promenade with your dog is still in effect.

Council hounds judge about dogs in office

ne10GGOO_t600[1]South Carolina Circuit Judge Diane Goodstein’s habit of bringing her dogs to work was never a problem in the old courthouse, but since opening a spiffy new one, Dorchester County Council members are squawking about it.

Amid rumors that there have been doggie “accidents”  inside the shiny new $13 million courthouse in St. George, the county council — though it lacks the authority to set rules for the courthouse — has instructed the county attorney to draft a letter to the clerk of court “requesting” that animals not be allowed on the premises, except for service animals.

“The taxpayers paying for the building don’t bring their dogs to work. Other county employees don’t bring their dogs to work. Frankly, I’m surprised I’m having to make this request,” Council Chairman Jamie Feltner said.

The request leaves County Clerk of Court Cheryl Graham, a pet lover and board member of the local SPCA  in an awkward spot, the Charleston Post and Courier reported.  “That’s mighty nice of the council to put that on me,” she told the newspaper.

“It’s a little bit of an embarrassment that it would be an issue,” Judge Goodstein said. Her dogs are well-trained and haven’t soiled the courthouse’s hallowed halls, she said. She thinks the “accident” rumor might have stemmed from one day when she got down on her hands and knees to clean a construction worker’s mud tracks from the floor.

The judge, who routinely brought her Cavalier King Charles spaniel, Boykin spaniel and Airedale to work with her in the old courthouse — vacated earlier this year — says she’ll comply with whatever verdict the clerk of court reaches.

Retailers growing more likely to allow dogs

The Los Angeles Times reports that a “surprising number” of stores have quietly opened their doors to dogs — from Nordstrom and Saks Fifth Avenue to Barneys New York.

The rules about shopping with dogs vary from store to door, mall to mall, and sometimes can even differ between a store and the mall that is in, the article points out. While Sears, Target and Staples all flatly deny entrance to dogs that aren’t providing service to the handicapped, others — rightly realizing they don’t have much room to be picky in today’s economy — are letting them in.

The Grove, a Mid-City outdoor mall in L.A., is open to all, the article said.

“Great Dane or poodle. Pure-bred or mutt. It doesn’t matter at the Grove, where any pup that is ‘Well-behaved,’ ‘on a leash’ and  ‘not wanting to bite people’ is invited, said spokeswoman Jennifer Gordon. And if that pup happens to drop a “present” under the mall’s Christmas tree … just clean it up, and all will be forgiven.”

A lot of other stores and shopping centers — in what we at ohmidog! consider blatant discrimination — allow small dogs only, some basing the cutoff point on whether the dog can fit, ala Paris Hilton’s Chihuahua, in a purse.

The news that more stores may be permitting dogs is heartening; reports that many still allow small dogs while banning big dogs are disturbing. Were I ever to encounter a store that allowed small dogs, but not mine, I’d be out the door, never to return, and making all my purchases at a place where dogs are always allowed — online.