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Tag: angel

Is Rescue Ink breaking up, or “evolving?”

rescueink

 
As fearless, outspoken, and in your face as they portray themselves, you’d think the gang at Rescue Ink would be a little more forthcoming about whatever it is that is going on within the organization, where, by some accounts, nearly half of the members — representing God only knows how many tattoos — have pulled out.

Instead, other than a vaguely worded official statement, they’ve left it up to their fans to figure out just who has left, and why.

Despite the continuing success of their National Geographic Channel TV show, and a recently released book, there are reports — mostly on Facebook — that four members have left the organization and the TV show, pretty much in unison, to pursue other interests.

The only official confirmation I could find was a statement by Rescue Ink member Mary Fayet posted on the group’s Facebook page of Joe Panz:

“Rescue Ink is an ever evolving animal rescue organization dedicated to battling animal abuse and neglect and assisting other animal-welfare agencies and shelters do the same. With much regret, we announce that some participants of Rescue Ink have chosen to depart the organization and as such we wish these departing members the best of luck in their future endeavors and thank them for their countless hours of dedication promoting the mission of Rescue Ink.

“Please be assured, however, that Rescue Ink, thanks to our founding members, countless dedicated recruits and volunteers’ remains stronger than ever and will continue to promote the Rescue Ink mission.”

The statement doesn’t say who has left. But, from what I can gather from the Facebook pages of Rescue Ink’s original members at least four – Eric, Angel, Robert and Batso — have departed.

Batso Maccharoli reports on his Facebook page: “THE INK OF RESCUE INK, THE ELDEST AND ORIGINAL MEMBER BATSO, HAS FLOWN THE COOP. I have decided to no longer be affiliated with Rescue Ink. I will continue to keep balance and harmony in my life by doing what I love most – helping.”

Rescue Ink, a nonprofit animal rescue organization based in Long Island, formed officially in 2008, and their TV show, “Rescue Ink: Unleashed,” premiered last year.

“I was just lucky that my dog was there”

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Here’s the Today Show’s report on the 11-year-old boy whose dog, Angel, is being credited with saving him from being attacked by a cougar in British Columbia. The dog had surgery yesterday and is still under veterinary care. The boy, Austin Forman, says he has bought his dog “a big nice juicy steak” for her return home.

Golden retriever saves boy from cougar

angelA golden retriever in British Columbia is being credited with saving an 11-year-old boy’s life, fending off a cougar that charged at the boy.

The dog, named — wouldn’t you just know it — “Angel,” had accompanied Austin Forman outside to get firewood.

When the cougar charged, Angel ran in front of it and tried to fight it off, allowing the boy to escape, according to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

The boy ran into the house screaming, “A cougar is eating Angel!” Police were called and were at the home within minutes. The cougar had dragged the dog under the home’s back porch by then, and the dog could be heard crying, according to CTV News in Canada.

Police shot the cougar twice, but it continued attacking the dog until a third, fatal shot was fired. Even after it was killed, the cougar’s jaws were still clenched on Angel’s face, the boy’s mother said. The dog lay still for a moments, then took in a big gulp of air and got up.

The Formans, of Boston Bar, about 160 miles northeast of Vancouver, said Angel received numerous puncture wounds around her head and neck, as well as a swollen eye, but that she was being treated and recovering.

(Photo: Royal Canadian Mounted Police)

The most common (and wacky) pet names

Petfinder.com has announced its annual ranking of the 10 most popular names for adoptable pets in 2009.

For the third year in a row, “Buddy” and “Max” came in at first and second for dogs, with “Lucy” and “Smokey” topping the list of cat names.

While many of the most common names have remained consistent year-to-year, there was one new name turning up on the list for both cats and dogs – “Bella.”

The top 10 dog names were: 1. Buddy; 2. Max; 3. Daisy; 4. Lucy; 5. Charlie; 6.  Bella; 7. Molly; 8. Jack; 9. Sadie; 10. Lady.

The top 10 cat names: 1. Lucy; 2. Smokey; 3. Midnight; 4. Bella; 5. Molly; 6. Daisy; 7. Oreo; 8. Shadow; 9. Charlie; 10. Angel.

Petfinder.com is also sharing its favorite quirky and unusual names of the year, selected from more than 170 submissions received via Facebook and Twitter.  Here are their favorites:

Shyanne Thailand Moo Goo Guy Pan, Mr. Tomfoolery Scardeycat Eliot, Rusty Buckets, KeelHaul, Too Fancy for You, Angry Donut, Maple Syrup, Hoseclamp, Prince Xavier Binxley, Hoku-ho’okele-wa’a.

“While funny names are always a big hit, we are also seeing a trend of pet parents giving their furry friends middle names, such as ‘Sunshine Ray,’ ‘Roxanna Bobanna Little’ and ‘Madison Wisconsin,’ suggesting that these animals are more like family members than family pets,” said Betsy Saul, the co-founder of Petfinder.com.

Petfinder.com is an online, searchable database of animals that need permanent homes, compiled from 12,900 animal shelters and adoption organizations across the USA, Canada and Mexico.

Krupa hoopla: Catholics irked by PETA ad

peta_joanna-krupaCatholics are cross with Joanna Krupa, the Playboy cover girl and “Dancing with the Stars” competitor whose latest ad for PETA features her wearing nothing but angel wings and a crucifix.

Krupa unveiled the new  “Be an Angel for Animals” PETA campaign at a protest this week outside Barkworks, a Los Angeles pet store that sells puppies.

The campaign, which urges people to adopt dogs rather than buy them, was quick to draw criticism from Catholic leaders.

“The fact is that cats and dogs are a lot safer in pet stores than they are in the hands of PETA employees,” Catholic League President Bill Donohue said in a statement. “Moreover, pet stores don’t rip off Christian iconography and engage in cheap irreligious claims. PETA is a fraud.”

“It’s totally inappropriate,” said Deal Hudson, publisher of InsideCatholic.com. “It’s another instance of disrespect toward Christianity and another example of the kind of abuse that would never occur with any other major religion, because the outcry would be so immediate and so loud that the people behind it would immediately retreat.”

Krupa, herself a Catholic, responded that she’s just doing what the church should be doing — and by that, we’re pretty sure she meant fighting for defenseless animals as opposed to shedding clothing.

“As a practicing Catholic, I am shocked that the Catholic League is speaking out against my PETA ads, which I am very proud of,” the New York Daily News quoted her as saying.

“I’m doing what the Catholic Church should be doing, working to stop senseless suffering of animals, the most defenseless of god’s creation. I am a voice for innocent animals who are being neglected and dumped by the millions at shelters. In my heart I know that Jesus would never condone the suffering that results when dogs and cats are allowed to breed.”

Karma and the angel in a paramedic’s uniform

Back in October, a registered nurse at a Memphis hospital handed a paramedic a folded-up note she had removed from the wallet of a patient whose identity she was trying to learn.

The patient had been hit by a car and was unconscious.

The note said: “I have two dogs that need to be taken care of. You will need animal control because one of the dogs is a Rottweiler. She is a good girl. Her name is Karma, six years old. The other dog’s name is Jasmine, 10 years old.”

The note also listed three contact names, and had a hand-drawn map showing how to get to his house. It concluded: “Thank you. Someone please take care of my babies.”

The patient’s name was Michael Short, a loner with no family in Memphis. His coma would last for weeks. And as it turned out, the note he scrawled on notebook paper and stuffed in his wallet couldn’t have landed in better hands.

Paramedic Pamey Hunter, 46, an animal lover, worked the nightshift at The Regional Medical Center at Memphis.

When her shift ended at 7 a.m., Hunter found Short’s home. She was greeted by Karma, the Rottweiler, who barked, snarled and lunged at the chain-link fence. Hunter left, returning a few minutes later with dog treats. At first she tossed them to Karma. Before too long, she had Karma eating out of her hand.

Then she ran out of treats and went to get some more food.

Karma greeted her with a wag of the nubby tail when she returned, let her in, and permitted her to go check on the other dog, Jasmine.

Hunter found the older dog in the hallway. She fed both dogs and promised to return that evening before she went to work.

And that’s exactly what she did — for two months.

She also  bought them dog beds, fresh hay for a doghouse and treats, took Jasmine to the vet for an ear infection, and gave her arthritis medicine every day. Hunter checked several times on Short, the 34-year-old man who spent weeks in a coma. It turned out to be his second major head injury, the first occuring when he was hit by a van at age 17. He couldn’t hear her, but Hunter assured him the dogs were being cared for.

When Short awoke from his coma, he asked about his dogs right away, and Hunter told him she’d bring them for a visit.

After Short went home, Hunter stayed in touch, and on Christmas, Short told her that Karma and Jasmine had been shopping and bought her a gift. She stopped by and Short handed her a small wrapped box. Inside was a necklace and a cross.

Hunter said she cared for Short’s dogs because didn’t want to call animal control. That’s what she told Cindy Wolff, the Memphis Commercial-Appeal reporter who unearthed this story – the kind we don’t hear about nearly often enough.  

“I knew because of the note that these dogs were the most important things to this man,” Hunter explained. “These dogs were all he had in the world and he wasn’t going to lose them if I could help it.”

How Jane lost her Angel

When Jane Guardascione, a 94-year-old Queens grandmother, lost her pet collie and constant companion, Angel, her granddaughter got on the phone, placing several calls to Animal Control and Care to see if the dog turned up in the city’s shelter system.

Angel wasn’t there, the agency repeatedly told her Friday.

On Saturday, though, she was told the 13-year-old dog had been euthanized at Animal Control and Care’s Manhattan shelter — the same day she arrived.

Shelter officials said Angel had collapsed at the shelter, had no identification and fit no description of any dogs reported lost. Because of her age and deteriorating condition, a veterinarian at the facility decided to euthanize Angel in an effort to prevent any additional suffering, the New York Daily News reports.

In a statement, the agency expressed ”deepest sympathies” to the family. “It is our goal to avoid euthanasia unless we deem it absolutely necessary,” the statement read.

Family members say, while Angel suffered from arthritis, she was able to get around just fine —  and was probably frozen with fear in the shelter. Jane’s daughter, Carole Miller, a collie breeder, gave her mother the dog when Angel was just over a year old. The dog was her constant companion, she said.

AC&C, which operates city shelters under a contract with the Health Department, is required to hold lost and stray animals for at least 72 hours before putting them up for adoption or euthanizing them. Exceptions are made if an animal is critically injured or gravely ill.

Outraged animal rescue groups said such mistakes are not unusual at AC&C and charged the nonprofit organization is plagued by mismanagement. In January, the Daily News reported that one rescue group sued the city because it was breaking its own law by not providing animal shelters in all five boroughs. The suit charged that facilities are overcrowded and disease-ridden and that animals are being euthanized in “unconscionable numbers” because there is no space.

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