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Tag: annapolis

Fifty-one dogs seized from Maryland home

Fifty-one dogs were seized Monday from a home in Pasadena, Maryland, by Anne Arundel County animal control officers.

The owners of the home described themselves as dog breeders, but admitted their operation “got out of hand,” The Capital in Annapolis reported.

Animal Control officers visited the home in the Green Gables neighborhood after receiving an anonymous tip.

Because homeowners Chuck Richard and his wife, Pam, didn’t have a dog fancier license, laws required they have no more than four dogs. The county plans to give the couple a citation and a $50 fine, police said.

Officers seized dozens of poodles, Yorkshire terriers and other dogs from the two-story home in the 1800 block of Choptank Road. The animals are being housed at the animals at the county shelter in Millersville.

Other than being dirty, the dogs seemed in good shape, and all but one appeared to be well-fed, animal control officials said.

The Richards were visited in 2006 by animal control officials who counted 24 dogs, but didn’t give the couple a citation.

Richard told The Capital that when the recession hit, it became harder to sell dogs.

“It just got harder and harder to find homes,” he said. “You hear about people hoarding, but it wasn’t like that. This just got out of hand.”

“I’m sad to see them go,” he added, “but in a strange way, it’s a relief.”

County Executive John R. Leopold is urging residents to visit the county shelter and adopt the animals. The animal shelter is open from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

Anthropologie to hold dog adoption events

Images of dogs have been popping up more and more in Anthropologie’s merchandise, but this fall many of the chain’s stores will be featuring actual dogs — shelter pets in need of adoption.

Anthropologie has partnered with animal welfare organizations across the country and will be holding pet adoption events and supply drives in many of its stores — including the one in Annapolis, on Oct. 2, from 10 a.m.to 5 p.m.

All in all, 70 stores are scheduled to host pet adoptions, food drives and yappy hour parties through the month of October. (The full list is below.) The chain is calling the campaign “Sit, Stay, Love.”

(Sketch by Fernando Boher, framed silkscreen available at Anthropologie, $148) Read more »

Walk for the animals in Anne Arundel County

The SPCA of Anne Arundel County is having their 19th annual Walk for the Animals on Sunday, May 2, from 8 a.m. to noon at Quiet Waters Park in Annapolis.

The  SPCA has been helping animals and the community since 1920.  The SPCA holds the walk to raise money to care for the thousands of homeless animals brought to their shelter each year.

Walkers can collect money between now and May 2. Incentive prizes are given to all walkers who collect at least $30.00.  To qualify for prizes the money must be turned in the day of the walk. 

Brochures and pledge sheets are on the AACSPCA website.

Walkers have several options — with 1 mile, 2.5 mile, and 5 mile courses, all of which are wheelchair and stroller accessible.  Pets are welcome but you don’t have to have an animal to walk.

Adoptable animals will be showcased on the SPCA’s Waggin’ Tails Mobile Adoption Unit, and, in addition to vendors and animal welfare and rescue groups, the  Anne Arundel County Police K9 Unit will give a demonstration.

For more information, call 410-268-4388.

Anne Arundel police shoot three pit bulls

Anne Arundel County Police shot and killed three pit bulls Monday night after the dogs were reported to be attacking livestock.

The dogs were among five that were reported to have been injuring goats and sheep in a fenced area on the 1600 block of Bay Head Road in Annapolis, WBAL-TV reported. Three dogs were still attacking livestock when police arrived Monday night.

“Fearing for their safety and the safety of the remaining livestock, officers located and shot three pit bulls,” police said in a press release.

None of the dogs had collars, microchips or other forms of identification.

In total, five sheep were killed, including two that had to be euthanized due to the extent of their injuries and a third that was shot by police to end its suffering. Four goats were injured during the attack.

Police said the dogs were owned by Richard Watts, 51. He was issued six citations — three for animals running at large and three for public safety threats.

“This was a very tragic incident as several animals died as a result of this attack,” said County Executive John R. Leopold. “I urge all pet owners to keep their pets on leashes and properly secure them from running loose and becoming a threat to public safety.”

Vermont case argues pets more than property

The Vermont Supreme Court heard arguments yesterday in a case that could create a new precedent for animal lovers who sue over the loss of their dogs.

shadowThe lawsuit was filed by a Maryland couple — Sarah and Denis Scheele of Annapolis, whose mixed-breed dog “Shadow” was fatally shot in 2003, according to an ABC News report.

Lewis Dustin, 76, of Northfield, Vt., pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of animal cruelty and was given a year probation. He also was ordered to perform 100 hours of community service and pay $4,000 to the Scheeles for the costs of adoption, medical bills and cremation.

The Scheeles, however, say that doesn’t come close to covering the emotional cost inflicted by the incident and the loss of companionship.

“Shadow was our little boy, our son, our child,” Sarah Scheele wrote on her website JusticeforShadow.com. “We loved him as if he were our own flesh and blood.”

The couple filed a civil suit against Dustin in 2006, arguing that the dog was more than “mere property.”

The incident occurred during the Scheeles’ July 2003 visit to relatives in Northfield, Vt., a small town south of Montpelier. Shadow wandered into the neighboring yard of Dustin, who fired an air pellet rifle at the dog to scare him off his property.

Mother, son get probation in cruelty case

A mother and son accused of neglecting and abusing 21 dogs living at their home received a harsh scolding and probation, but no jail time at their sentencing last week.

“I am rarely at a loss for words,” District Court Judge Robert C. Wilcox said as he flipped through pictures of their Orchard Beach home. “But I have never, ever, ever seen a picture of a more filthy or more disgusting house. Caves are cleaner than this.”

Wilcox, during a hearing in Annapolis,told Janet Taylor and her son, Jeffrey, both Pasadena residents, that sending them to jail w0uld representative an improvement in their living conditions, The Capital in Annapolis reported.

“Putting you people in jail would be treating you better than these animals were treated,” Wilcox said. “Having said that, I’m not sure going to jail is the right thing. You’d be living better, and the taxpayers would be paying for it.”

The Taylors each pleaded guilty to five counts each of animal cruelty. Wilcox sentenced Janet Taylor, 62, to 90 days in jail for each count of animal cruelty, but suspended the sentence and placed Taylor on probation for three years.

Her son, 38, was sentenced to three months probation and six months of community service at the county landfill.  The judge said he was initially going to order him to perform community service at the county’s animal shelter, but “they don’t want you.”

Neither of the Taylors will be allowed to own a pet during their probationary period.

The Taylors originally were charged with 42 counts each of animal cruelty and inflicting unnecessary pain on an animal after animal control officers and other county workers raided their home Aug. 28. Authorities removed 21 Shar Pei mixes from the house and a camper in the front yard.

Ellie found unharmed, and still in her crate

Anne Arundel County police said the dog taken when her owner’s car was stolen in Annapolis has been found safe in her crate.

Ellie, an eight-month-old German short-haired pointer was reunited yesterday with her owner, Ben Terfehr, an Army sergeant based at Ft. Mead who is awaiting deployment to Iraq.

Police said the dog was discovered in her crate near an industrial park at Nursery Road and Central Avenue in the Linthicum area.

A friend of Terfehr’s said he told her the dog was found in a McDonald’s parking lot, and quoted him as saying — despite the fact that his jeep still hasn’t been found — “I’m so happy!” The friend,  in a comment posted on ohmidog!, said Ellie’s toys were in the crate with her, and that the thief left a blanket over the crate, apparently to keep her warm.

After he and Ellie visited Quiet Waters Park last week, Terfehr went into a gas station in Annapolis buy a beverage and came out to find someone jumping into his Jeep and driving away.