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Tag: avocados

Diller: The avocado-eating dog that helps propagate the species

avocadodogWhen it comes to avocados, Diller is a dog who doesn’t just crave the fleshy green fruit, but seems to have an abiding respect for the pit as well.

Diller was born to the litter of a pregnant rescue dog and taken in by a family that was moving to a horse ranch in Southern California.

Roaming the grounds there, he quickly discovered a couple of abandoned avocado trees that remained from an old orchard that used to be a few hundred feet from the house.

He tried one. He liked it. And he’s been picking them off the trees and eating them ever since.

We’ll point out here that giving your dog an entire avocado is not a good idea. They are not toxic to dogs, but the pits can be a choking hazard

avodogtwoDiller, though is a meticulous eater, according to a recent story in The Dodo. He never bites into the pit, but he does lick them so clean that they shine.

“One day I came home from work and there were two perfectly clean avocado pits sitting at the foot of my chair. They seriously looked like they had been polished,” said Diller’s owner Robert Moser. “I was sitting there wondering, ‘What the heck?’, when Diller sauntered in with the third, gently placed it on my shoe, and wagged his tail, clearly expecting pets for being a very good boy.”

Moser had tried sprouting avocados from pits before, but never with success.

“Pits that had been whacked out of the avocado with a knife were usually too scuffed up, and if you tried to grow them with the brown seed skin still on, they’d usually rot,” Moser said. “With that in mind, I knew what I had to try the moment I saw the clean pits laid at my feet.”

Almost all of the seeds Diller brought him have sprouted, and Diller ended up with more avocado saplings than he knew what to do with.

avothreeNow he regularly gives them as gifts (accompanied by a photo of Diller with the seed the plant sprouted from) and trades them with other farmers.

“There are probably a few dozen Diller-trees throughout California nowadays, Moser said.

“The earliest of Diller’s trees are just starting to bear fruit. I know the folks that have them will think of him every time they harvest. It’s the sort of thought that makes you smile when it crosses your mind, you know?”

(Photos: From The Dodo; provided by Robert Moser)

EV-uh-oh: Is Rachael Ray poisoning our dogs?

The quick answer is no. Despite a recent boo boo — actually a boo boo repeated from 2006 — in one of her “dog-friendly” recipes, Rachel Ray, whether you find her endearing or annoying, appears to be a true dog person, dog lover and dog philanthropist.

That one of her recipes — reprinted alongside a profile of Ray in this month’s Modern Dog magazine — calls for onions, which can be toxic to dogs, was an unfortunate oversight, a result of either the conflicting information that’s out there or a reflection of Ray’s learning curve when it comes to canines.

The recipe in question, “Isaboo’s Butternut Squash Mac and Cheddar,” originally appeared in Ray’s own magazine, Every Day with Rachael Ray, which runs a “pet friendly” recipe in every issue — a meal you can make for both you and your dog to eat.

The macaroni and cheese dish, which calls for half an onion, was the first of those to appear in the magazine, back in March 2006.

Ray also has her own dog food company, Rachael Ray Nutrish, some of the profits from which go to her own rescue organization, as she’s quick to point out on her website:

“There are no fillers.  No junk.  Just lots of good, wholesome stuff. How cool is that? And you know me.  I’m all about giving back, so some of the proceeds from Rachael Ray Nutrish go to charities that take care of animals who have no one else to look out for them.  Wow.  How good do you feel now?”

But back to poisoning dogs.

After the onion episode came to light, we went back and checked all the “dog-friendly” recipes Ray has published in her magazine, starting in April 2006 — all 27 of them — and we’re pleased to report that none of them are likely to kill your dog.

True, some of them call for avocados, which are toxic to dogs, and scallions, which are toxic to dogs, and nutmeg, high levels of which can result in seizures, tremors, central nervous system problems and death.

But almost always those recipes point out — either in the ingredient list or in the directions — to use those items only in the human portions.

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