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Tag: beagle

Royal news: Prince Harry and Meghan reportedly are parents (of a new dog)

Reports are that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have a new addition — though photographs have yet to be published, a name has not been mentioned, and lineage has yet to be established.

PEOPLE says it has confirmed that a new pup has joined the family. The puppy photos in the video above (not from PEOPLE) are not believed to be the new royal pup.

The magazine says the couple got the dog — believed to be a Labrador — in early summer, and quotes sources as saying the new dog has been joining them at their country getaway in the Cotswolds area and Nottingham Cottage at Kensington Palace in London.

Harry and Meghan’s path, in that way, follows that of Harry’s brother, Prince William, and Kate Middleton. Shortly after they married they got a cocker spaniel. Shortly after that, they were parents of human babies.

Meghan and Harry’s new dog will join Guy, the rescued beagle that Meghan entered the marriage with.

Meghan, 37, had to leave her other aging dog, Bogart, with a friend when she moved to London from Toronto last November, when the couple got engaged.

Guy went from a U.S. shelter to a Canadian adoption group and was then adopted by Meghan Markle in 2015. He has become a visible part of Meghan’s new royal life. He sat her feet as she sat for her hair and makeup on her wedding morning, and was said to be one of the highlights at the wedding reception.

A spokeswoman at Kensington Palace declined to comment on the new arrival, PEOPLE said.

(Photos: Guy and Bogart, at left; Harry and Meghan, on wedding day, at right)

Here’s the poop on the new royal dog


After this weekend’s royal wedding — which I was about as interested in as I am in, well, royal anything — there’s a new dog in the royal family: a once down and out Kentucky beagle named Guy.

I avoided coverage of the wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry like the plague, instantly flipping away from any channel that mentioned it, but in my efforts to stay on top of dog news, I couldn’t miss this.

Much like the marriage of the American actress and the prince, Guy’s story is “a total fairytale,” said Alison Preiss of Pet Valu, the Ontario pet store where Guy was adopted by Markle in 2015.

“Here is this dog that was in a shelter, nobody wanted him, and through this wonderful adoption he’s now living in a palace, running around with the royal family.”

Guy was a stray who had been picked up in the woods and held in a Kentucky shelter. It was a kill shelter, and Guy’s days were numbered when shelter staff contacted Dolores Doherty, who runs an Ontario-based rescue called A Dog’s Dream. The organization focuses on saving beagles scheduled to be euthanized.

Guy was shipped to Toronto and ended up, the day after his arrival, being featured at an adoption event at a Pet Valu store.

Among those who showed up at the store that day was Markle, who adopted him. Markle at the time was living in Toronto while her TV series, Suits, was being filmed there.

Doherty had never heard of Markle, but the next thing she knew Guy started showing up in Instagram posts.

New of Markle’s engagement to Prince Harry, Doherty said, was “just beyond my wildest imagination. How is that for a rags to riches story from a good old Kentucky beagle?”

guyandbogartIn November, Prince Harry’s communication secretary confirmed that Guy had moved to the UK and was living with Markle, The Guardian reported. Her other dog, Bogart, is believed was too old to make the journey is staying with Markle’s close friends.

Guy was photographed over the weekend, riding in the back seat with the queen.

Doherty said about 1,600 dogs have been adopted through her organization.

“The dogs that have come up here have really impacted a lot of lives. So there’s a lot of happy endings, but his certainly is the most outstanding.”

(Photos: At top: Markle’s dogs Guy and Bogart, by Meghan Markle / Instagram; lower Guy, spotted riding in the backseat with Queen Elizabeth II / Twitter)

Rise of the French bulldog continues

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French bulldogs are now the most popular breed in New York and Los Angeles, and the fourth most popular nationwide, according to the American Kennel Club’s annual ranking of breed popularity.

This year’s national ranking show Frenchies climbing into the top five for the first time. Twenty years ago, the breed was 76th on the list.

And, no, we’re not burying the lede here.

Yes, Labrador retrievers have once again been proclaimed America’s most popular breed, but after 27 years in a row of that happening it hardly qualifies as news.

DSC06082The French bulldog’s rise is a fresher, more significant and more worrisome development, perhaps highlighting the divide between dainty big city breeds and those good ol’ breeds we’ve long held dear.

The breed jumped two spots from number six to number four in 2017. In doing so, it knocked the beagle out of the top five for the first time since 1998, and further cemented its hold on the top spot in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and West Palm Beach.

Yes, it is a trendy breed, and an urban breed. A French bulldog is not going to retrieve that duck whose life you just ended. You’re not going to see a French bulldog on the cover of Field and Stream.

One did make the cover of the Village Voice back in 2015, though, under the headline, “Don’t Buy This Dog.”

The breed had already become No. 1 in New York by then, and the article, by Michael Brandow, enumerated all the reasons that was a bad thing — chief among them the health problems the breed faces because of decades of inbreeding.

An excerpt:

“What’s wrong with French bulldogs? Where should I begin? Generations of unwise inbreeding to no good end, far beyond what would be needed to keep their signature looks, have left these cartoon critters with low resistance to illness and allergies. Physically handicapped at birth (by cesarean, because the heads are, like the owners’ pride, inflated) with squashed-in faces that are freakishly flat, they face serious challenges in performing some of any mammal’s basic functions — like getting enough oxygen and keeping their bodies at a safe temperature. Life’s burdens grow heavier under a long list of deformities preventing even mobility, and a task as simple as walking is no small feat.”

New Yorkers didn’t much heed the then-newsweekly’s warning. Demand just kept increasing, and with it so did worries about unscrupulous breeders and under-informed owners.

AKC officials say they expect the popularity of the downsized bulldogs with the pointed ears to continue as more city dwellers look for a breed that is compact and relatively quiet.

“The French bulldog is poised for a takeover,” AKC Executive Secretary Gina DiNardo said in a statement, noting the breed’s “adaptability” and “loveable temperament.”

Here are the top 10 breeds in the U.S., according to the AKC:

1. Labrador retriever

2. German shepherd

3. Golden retriever

4. French bulldog

5. Bulldog

6. Beagle

7. Poodle

8. Rottweiler

9. Yorkshire terrier

10. German short-haired pointer

Dog’s ear cyst resembles Donald Trump

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I’ve written before about that distinctively human tendency to see images in inanimate objects — everything from Jesus on a grilled cheese sandwich to a dog in a piece of wood.

My theory on that whole phenomenon is that we see, with only the slightest hint or suggestion, what our subconscious wants us to see, such as Abraham Lincoln in a chicken nugget; or what it fears seeing, such as Satan in a storm cloud.

But Donald Trump in a dog’s ear? I won’t attempt to explain that.

BBC reported that Jade Robinson, 25, of Jarrow, Tyneside, was photographing her beagle’s infected ear when a friend spotted the 45th president’s face in the dog’s cyst.

chiefThe dog’s name? Chief.

Robinson said she was taking the picture to pass along to her vet. Chief would have to be sedated for the vet to properly examine the ear — and she was short of the funds necessary to do that.

Amazingly enough, her photo going viral led her to launch a crowdfunding campaign, which has already raised 80 percent of its £450 goal.

Hail to the chief!

On the justgiving.com website, Robinson warns that goal amount will likely increase depending on what treatments the vet prescribes — up to and including removing the president from Chief’s ear.

Robinson said she has always made it a point to keep Chief’s ears clean, but beagles are notorious for picking up dirt, which, as we all know, can lead to infections.

“If you know anything about beagles you know how intelligent, active and curious they are and Chief certainly lives up to that – he’s full of mischief.

“As he has the very distinctive long ears, they spend a lot of time scraping the ground sniffing for lovely smells; unfortunately this leads to his ears picking up a lot of dirt.”

Robinson said she never saw Trump when she was taking the photo.

“…It was my eagle-eyed friend who pointed it out.”

Readers: Please note how I, despite my political leanings, presented that whole story without implying the current president is in any way a cyst in need of removal. Nor did I comment on how awful it would be to have Donald Trump constantly in one’s ear — mainly because, between his tweets and the news media, we already know that.

Chinese lab produces what it says is the world’s first “superdog” clone

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Chinese scientists say they have produced a “superdog” clone — and that the technology will enable them to mass produce dogs that are extra strong and extra fast.

And, unless you are a fan of the doggy version of eugenics, you might find that extra scary.

The beagle, named Long Long, was born in May, becoming one of China’s first canine clones and, the scientist’s maintain, the world’s first genetically modified canine clone.

“This is a breakthrough, marking China as only the second country in the world to independently master dog-somatic clone technology, after South Korea,” said Lai Liangxue, a researcher of Guangzhou Institute of Biological Medicine and Health with the Chinese Academy of Science.

The beagle puppy was genetically engineered by deleting a gene called myostatin, giving him double the muscle mass of a normal beagle.

longlongHe was one of 27 puppies created at Sino Gene, a biotech company based in Beijing — all clones of a laboratory research dog named Apple, according to published reports.

The researchers created 65 embryos through cloning, and genetically modified all of them.

Only Long Long had his myostatin deleted.

By combining genetic editing and cloning, scientists say they can produce “superbreeds” that are stronger and faster.

“With this technology, by selecting a certain gene of the dog, we can breed an animal with more muscles, better sense of smell and stronger running ability, which is good for hunting and police applications,” Lai said.

He also suggested that the gene-editing technology could be commercialized and further applied to create dogs with diseases such as autism, Parkinson’s and diabetes, for use in medical research.

It’s just the latest chapter in dog cloning, which has a frightening history and, potentially, an even scarier future.

Efforts to clone dog began in the U.S., with early research at Texas A&M funded by backers who saw cloning people’s pets — often sick, dying or even dead — as a profitable business enterprise.

Canine cloning wasn’t achieved until a few years later at Seoul National University in South Korea when Snuppy, the world’s first canine clone, was born in 2005.

The service would be offered to pet owners by several businesses, only one of which remains, Sooam Bioengineering Research Institute, the laboratory of controversial South Korean scientist Hwang Woo Suk.

longlong2Twelve years would pass before China became the second country to clone dogs — and clone them with a twist.

Lai says his team will be able to “batch produce” customized dogs through cloning and gene-editing, which in addition to possible military and law enforcement uses, would create an endless supply of dogs for use in laboratories by medical researchers.

The researcher has worked for years on genetically modifying dogs. By mastering cloning, and combining it with his gene-editing, he’s able to endlessly duplicate any successes he achieves.

As with Dolly the sheep and Snuppy the dog, Lai’s achievement is seen as ominous by some.

“It’s true that the more and more animals that are genetically engineered using these techniques brings us closer to the possibility of genetic engineering of humans,” David King, director of Human Genetics Alert, told the Express..

“That does set us on the road to eugenics,” King added. “I am very concerned with what I’m seeing.”

Me, too. Dog cloning raises some significant animal welfare concerns. Technology, especially when coupled with greed or ego, tends to run amok. Eugenics is a nightmarish pursuit, as is its canine version. Creating diseased dogs for medical research is just plain wrong.

On top of all that, this latest twist being touted by the Chinese researchers fails to recognize one simple fact:

Dogs are already super.

(Photos: Sino Gene)

Beagle B&B is a sight to see

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During our year traveling across America in search of all things dog, Ace and I missed this place — a B&B in Idaho that resembles a giant beagle.

The Dog Bark Park Inn is located in the city of Cottonwood, population less than 1,000.

beagle2It serves as home base for husband and wife artists Dennis J. Sullivan and Frances Conklin, who opened the B&B in 2003.

Sullivan, a chain saw artist who specializes in dog designs, built the dog shaped unit, named Sweet Willy, and his smaller sidekick, Toby.

You can’t sleep inside Toby, but Sweet Willy contains two bedrooms and a bathroom, and rents for about $100 a night. (Pets are welcome for an extra $15 fee.)

The two-acre property also includes a sculpture garden featuring other works of art, including a 12-foot fire hydrant with a portable toilet inside, the Huffington Post reports.

It reminds me a bit of Dog Mountain, the park-like Vermont complex featuring the art of its creator, artist Stephen Huneck.

At the Dog Bark Park Inn, guests check in at the owners’ studio and gift shop, located nearby.

dennisandfrancesDennis is a self-taught chainsaw artist who has been carving for over 30 years. Frances joined him twenty years ago and also carves, according to the studio’s website.

They say their “big break” came in 1995 when their carvings were featured on QVC. With the fame came more hard work.

“We did nothing but carve wooden dogs for 18 months (our children barely remember seeing us during those days!), made what seemed like a bundle of money, invested it all in developing and building Dog Bark Park.”

bernese_mountain_dog_jpgTogether, they carve more than 60 different breeds and poses of dogs, and will take custom orders on request, carving dogs based on photos provided by owners.

In 2003 they received the Take Pride in Idaho Cultural Tourism Award for a large carved art exhibit depicting the story of Seaman, the dog who accompanied Lewis and Clark on their exploratory journey to the Pacific two hundred years ago.

(Photos: Dog Bark Park Inn)

Jessie the beagle’s castle under the stairs

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Tom Wadsworth took a storage area under a staircase and converted it into a Victorian cottage retreat for his beagle, Jessie.

For just a little over £100 — about $130 — Wadsworth, who lives in Plymouth, England, put together a spacious room with a picket fence, a secret door, a four-poster bed, and historical photographs, all of them bearing Jessie’s beagle head.

“I finished it last week. I originally did the outside but then Facebook and social media told me to do the inside as well so I did,” Wadsworth said. All together, it took about a month.

jessie1“I just want people to see what they could do with spaces they don’t think about,” he added.

Jessie had been sleeping in a pen in the living room. She was hesitant to move into her cottage at first, but now she loves it.

“We moved her bean bag into where the bed is. It took her a while to learn how to use the secret door but now she used it every day and night.”

The outside features climbing vines, a window for her to look through and a Victorian style lantern, according to a report in The Herald.

Friends and family frequently come by to see it, and Wadsworth says some have accused him of having too much time on his hands.

He says Jessie seems to appreciate the new set up and keeps her room tidy: “She’s got a pretty good temperament and knows what’s her space and to respect it.”