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Tag: california

California takes bold step: As of 2019, pet stores can only sell rescues and shelter dogs

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California has become the first state to require that pet stores cease selling pets provided by breeders and sell only cats and dogs from nonprofit rescues and shelters.

The law is expected to hit the pet industry like an earthquake when it goes into effect at the beginning of 2019.

The mere discussion of it, in recent months, has been sending tremors through the ranks of breeders, pet store owners and American Kennel Club officials.

Despite the contention of those groups that the law would strip Californians of their rights, it does not prohibit people from buying dogs and cats directly from breeders.

Instead it’s aimed a puppy mills and stemming the flow of dogs bred in unacceptable conditions to consumers through pet stores.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 485 on Friday.

“This is a big win for our four-legged friends, of course. But also for California taxpayers who spend more than $250 million annually to house and euthanize animals in our shelters,” Assemblymember Patrick O’Donnell, D-Long Beach, the author of the bill, said in a statement Friday.

An estimated 35 cities across California have enacted similar laws, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, but the passage of the Pet Rescue and Adoption Act marks the first time a state has adopted such protections.

Violators will face $500 in penalties.

“We are overjoyed that Governor Brown signed this historic piece of legislation into law,” said Judie Mancuso, president and founder of Social Compassion in Legislation.

(Photo: Pinterest)

Bring us your tired, your poor, your … On second thought, don’t bring us anybody

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The American Kennel Club apparently wants to keep dogs rescued from foreign countries out of America, saying they will bring disorder and disease to our pristine shores.

In voicing its opposition to a California bill that would prohibit the sale in pet stores of dogs sourced from professional breeders, the AKC says the law would create a “perverse incentive” to import “greater numbers of street dogs and dogs of unknown origins.”

Limiting the public’s access to purebreds, as the AKC maintains the proposed law would do, would result in the U.S. becoming “a magnet for the world’s strays and sick animals.”

jindolAKC Vice President Sheila Goffe, in a commentary piece published in the Orange County Register, singles out dogs rescued from abusive situations in foreign countries — as my dog was — and portrays them as unpredictable and diseased.

Dogs that come from rescues and shelters, or through rescues and shelters, aren’t as well-screened, as temperament-tested, and as disease-free as breeder-raised dogs purchased at pet stores, she says.

Those “facts” are questionable. That logic is wrong. That stance reeks of snobbery and flies in the face of those words on the plaque at the Statue of Liberty, and what many Americans still think America is all about.

And, as with the immigration debate when it comes to humans, it’s more than a bit ironic, considering all those purebred breeds the AKC celebrates, and makes money from, came from foreign countries.

Of course, the AKC isn’t saying America should ban German shepherds, or Irish setters, or Portuguese water dogs, or even Afghan hounds — or any of the many other breeds who proudly carry their country of origin in their breed names.

Those, assuming they are purebreds, and have their paperwork, and pay their AKC dues, are always welcome here.

The great unwashed masses, though? The dog saved from being turned into meat in Korea? The starving street dog in Afghanistan or some other war torn country? That mangy cur searching for sustenance in the aftermath of an earthquake, tsunami or other far away natural disaster?

The AKC apparently believes they have no place here.

Reasonable people disagree when it comes to how much effort we as Americans should put into saving dogs from overseas. Legitimate arguments can be made on both sides.

Given the shrinking but still mind-boggling number of unwanted dogs that are euthanized in U.S. shelters, given the needs created by our own disasters at home, like Hurricane Harvey, there are those who feel American dogs should come first. Others feel our compassion for animals shouldn’t be limited by boundaries — that we should help dogs who need help, wherever they are.

There’s a place for that debate. But Assembly Bill 245 — still awaiting Senate approval — really isn’t that place.

AB 245 bans the pet store sale of dogs, cats and other pets raised by breeders, who, especially when it comes to puppy mills, aren’t always the rule-following, highly policed and regulated operations the AKC portrays them as.

DSC05635 (2)Saying the law will lead to an influx of unwanted and unsavory foreigners, as the AKC is doing, is the same kind of fear tactic that taints our country’s broader debate over human immigration.

Banning the sale of breeder raised dogs at pet stores will not lead to an influx of Mexican rapist dogs, or Muslim terrorist dogs.

What the bill would do is limit pet stores to dealing in dogs obtained through shelters and rescues — a direction many stores and some local governments have already embraced.

Having visited many humane societies and a few puppy mills, I can tell you that even if shelters face fewer government-imposed restrictions, their dogs are more likely to be temperament-tested, well-adjusted and healthy than those that go the puppy mill to pet store to consumer route.

And we don’t see rescuing mutts or purebreds, from any country, as “perverse.”

“Selling only shelter or rescue dogs creates a perverse incentive to import greater numbers of street dogs and dogs of unknown origins for U.S. retail rescues,” Goffe, who is the AKC’s vice president for government relations, wrote. “In fact, the U.S. already has become a dumping ground for foreign ‘puppy mill’ and rescue dogs, importing close to 1 million rescue dogs annually from Turkey, several countries in the Middle East and as far away as China and Korea, according to the National Animal Interest Alliance.”

(Don’t be too impressed by the reference to NAIA. It is mostly a front group for breeders and agribusiness and the AKC, and it was founded by an AKC board member and a biomedical researcher.)

“It’s a crap shoot whether these foreign street dogs Californians may be adopting are carrying serious diseases,” Goffe added. “That’s because while importation laws require all dogs to be examined by a licensed veterinarian, foreign paperwork is commonly invalid or forged … dogs from other countries are not subject to the health and welfare laws of professionally-bred U.S. dogs.”

The AKC says Californians would lose their freedom to have the kind of dog they want if the law passes, implying that pet stores are the only place one can find a purebred.

That’s not the case. You can generally find any breed of dog in a shelter or rescue — often even locally. And the proposed law would not prevent people from buying dogs directly from breeders.

So fear not, California (even though the AKC would like you to.) Your liberties are not about to be taken away. Your shores are not about to be inundated with sickly, mangy killer dogs who don’t speak English.

And if more dogs rescued from other countries end up in the U.S. — in hopes of saving their lives and making their lives better — chances are they, as with the human immigrants before them, will only enrich our culture, whether we’re talking California or Connecticut.

We’re not a nation of purebreds, no matter what the AKC says — not when it comes to dogs, and not when it comes to people.

(Photos: At top, dogs awaiting slaughter at an outdoor market in Seoul; Jinjja, the rescued Korean dog I adopted; Jinjja and me)

BBC anchor can’t get too excited (at all) about dog surfing contest in California

Remember when you were a kid and your mother asked you to do something, like clean your room or take the trash out … and then she asked you nine more times … and then, while having far more important things to do, you finally, begrudgingly, did it?

You did it with with a bit of surliness, with total disdain for the task and for the person who assigned it, and while heaving lots of sighs.

That apparently is how BBC news anchor Simon McCoy felt about introducing this “news” report about a dog surfing competition in Northern California.

Pausing often, and emitting frequent sighs, McCoy prefaces his remarks by noting August is always a slow news month. Then he barely gets through reading the words, which clearly were written by someone else — someone who thought the event was cute.

McCoy apparently didn’t think that it was cute, or that it was news, and his performance behind the news desk was so lackluster that it has gone viral and made it on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

The Colbert bit shows the real McCoy, then features a faux BBC newscaster who has introduced one too many animal stories.

The real McCoy ends his narration saying, “That’s a shame, we’ve run out of pictures,” before turning things over to the weatherman.

McCoy’s demeanor suggests he thought presenting such fluff was beneath him, and not where he expected his career, which included covering the war in Iraq and the royal family, to turn.

(Buck up, Simon, there are still wars being waged and there’s a good chance more are ahead, possibly quite soon.)

We all need a little fluff now and then, and what is more delightful than watching dogs surf or, for that matter, watching dogs do anything?

It’s when we get a steady diet of it — and that seems to be the direction the news media continues to head — that it becomes unhealthy.

McCoy’s lackluster reading is being praised as “heroic” by some on Twitter, who maintain he gave the report exactly the enthusiasm it deserved.

Perhaps McCoy, through his demeanor, was providing commentary on the state of the worldwide news media, or simply exhibiting that stereotypical British nose-in-the-air disdain for trivial, silly (generally American) things. Perhaps it was a little of both, or even just a little on-camera shtick.

In any case, we’d suggest — without being too judgmental, too serious, or too fluffy — that he needs a vacation.

And a dog.

COzpDmAW8AA_RXS(Late breaking news: Simon McCoy informs us he will be taking a vacation next week — with his two border terriers.

Surfing is not on the itinerary.

See his full comment below.)

(Photo: Posted by McCoy on Twitter)

Unusually bold attacks see wild cats enter homes to snag dogs

The more we intrude on what was their domain, the more likely we are to have run-ins of the unpleasant variety with wildlife — even inside the safety of our homes.

In the past two weeks, two homeowners say wild cats entered their homes in pursuit of their pets — a mountain lion in San Mateo County, Calif., and a bobcat Plano, Texas.

In the California case, the mountain lion snatched a woman’s dog at night as she, her child and the pet slept in her bed.

Both intrusions were seen as uncommonly bold for the species, and both have served to renew local and regional debates on how best to handle the kinds of predators that, despite development, can still show up in suburban and rural areas.

Some, like the bobcat-encountering woman above, say get rid of them entirely — as in wipe them off the planet, or at least our ritzy suburb. Others favor trapping, tranquilizing, killing, relocating, or poisoning (which can be problematic for dogs, too). Some might favor taking a look at whatever more reasonable steps could lead to a more peaceful alliance.

We’d note at at the outset that, in both cases outlined here, the homeowners had left doors opened — so perhaps for people living in areas where such animals are sometimes sighted, shutting the damn door might be a good and sound first step.

That would have prevented what was a real life nightmare for Vickie Fought, of Pescadero, Calif. She and her daughter awoke to see their dog, a 15-pound Portuguese Podengo sleeping at the foot of the bed they shared, snatched and taken away by what has since been confirmed was a mountain lion.

About 3 a.m., the woman awoke in her home to hear the dog, named Lenore, barking. She glimpsed the shadow of an animal walking through her bedroom, according to NBC

Fought got out of bed and used a flashlight to look for her dog, but saw only large wet paw prints at the entrance of her bedroom.

Officers from the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office collected a drop of blood found on the floor, which was taken to a wildlife forensics laboratory in Sacramento that same day.

Testing showed Monday that the blood included DNA from a mountain lion, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Capt. Patrick Foy of the Department of Fish and Wildlife, said the small dog was apparently what the mountain lion was after. Foy said it was the first case he’d heard of a mountain lion walking into a home.

“This person had left the door open, so the animal got in. That problem is fixed,” he added. “They’re not sleeping with the door open anymore.”

Earlier this week, in the suburbs of Dallas, a woman watched as a bobcat chased her miniature pinschers through an open door and into her house.

Plano resident Pat McDonald says she heard a scream and turned to see her female dog, Precious, running in the door. Behind the little dog, she says, was a bobcat. “He came right in,” she said.

McDonald says the large cat raced through her home and jumped on top of a six foot tall display cabinet. It ran back out, but not before biting the dog on the neck. Precious is expected to recover, according to CBS in Dallas.

Officials say it was the first instance they recall of bobcat entering someone’s home.

Folks lining up to bring home this Picasso

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Like the subjects of his namesake’s paintings, Picasso the dog has a face that seems to exist on separate planes.

The lower half of his snout lines up just perfectly under his hopeful brown eyes, but the upper half, due to a facial deformity, veers drastically to the right, making his drooping nose look like it’s about to slide off.

picassoandpabloFour of his siblings were sold, but Picasso and a brother (since named Pablo) ended up at the Porterville Animal Shelter in California.

Picasso, due to his lopsided appearance, was put on the euthanize list.

Last month, an Oregon rescue group pulled Picasso and Pablo from the shelter in hopes of finding them homes.

And not long after the first photo of Picasso hit the Internet, he became a celebrity of viral proportions.

“They’re really nice dogs — not just adorable, but wonderful dogs,” Liesl Wilhardt, executive director of Luvable Dog Rescue in Eugene, told TODAY.

picasso2Since their Feb. 11 arrival, Picasso and his brother, 10-month-old pit bull-terrier mixes, have become the stars of the rescue’s social media feeds — and hundreds of people have inquired about adopting them in the last few days.

The rescue is insisting that, because of their bond, they be adopted as a pair.

For now, the brothers are staying with several other dogs in a communal living-style cabin operated by Luvable Dog Rescue.

The rescue says that, while they’re accepting applications, they’re still working to address Picasso’s medical needs, including removing a tooth that’s digging into gums.

That’s not going to alter his unusual appearance, but judging from the response his lopsided mug has received, that’s not going to matter.

(Photos: Luvabledogrescue.org)

Look what showed up at the “night drop”

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Video stores and libraries aren’t the only places where you’ll find “night drops.”

Some animal shelters have them, too — areas where dogs and cats in need of homes can be dropped off after hours, anonymously, and under the cover of night.

A few weeks ago, a veterinary technician who was the first to arrive for work at the Animal Friends of the Valleys shelter in Riverside County, California, found two boxers — one pink, one brown, both nearly hairless.

Both of the dogs, who were abandoned without a note identifying their previous owner, had a skin condition called demodex mange.

asiaandartie“I felt so badly for Artie and Asia when I first saw them,” said Jennifer Glover, a vet tech for the shelter in Wildomar. “But I was encouraged by the fact that we would be able to start helping them.”
“They were very sweet when they arrived but they were depressed,” Glover added. “Within just one day of having someone care for them here, they were so much happier and more outgoing.”

The skin condition is a treatable one.

The dogs have been responding well to treatment and both have been sent on to Last Chance at Life Rescue to be put up for adoption, according to People.com.

Asia, the pink one is believed to be about 10 months old, and Artie about 2 years old.

On top of the skin condition, caused by mites, Asia has a heart murmur, and Artie has some eye issues, but they otherwise seem healthy and playful.

“I assure you they were both unsettled with being dumped but they know very quickly that the staff at Animal Friends of the Valleys and the volunteers at LCAL are their ‘friends,’ and there to help them,” said Lisa Hamilton, founder and president of Last Chance At Life. “They are with us until we find their perfect home.”

Hamilton says people have already inquired about adopting the pair, and that anyone interested should contact them through the organization’s website.

(Photos: Last Chance at Life Rescue)

Man gets revenge on porch package poacher

Mike Zaremba says he has had three packages stolen from the front porch of his home in Riverside, Calif.

On Tuesday, with help from his Great Dane and a handful of other dogs, he got some revenge.

After a birthday party for his one-year-old dog, Zaremba scooped all the poop seven canine guests had left in the yard, packed it neatly into a white priority mail box and left it on his front porch.

pooppackageAs he suspected, the thief (or at least a thief) struck again, and Zaremba’s security cam recorded him making off with the box on a bicycle, CBS in Los Angeles reported.

“At first I really felt violated even though I knew what was inside the package, I was still like, he stole from me!” Zaremba said.

Zaremba said a friend gave him the idea.

He laid out his plan beforehand on his Facebook page:

“I’m expecting some packages from USPS and UPS… but there have been a lot of package thefts lately. So tomorrow I’m going to package up a box full of dog [poop] and leave it on my front porch. I’m going to have a camera rolling so if I catch the thief I can turn the footage into the news,” he wrote Tuesday.

Riverside police eventually tracked down the alleged taker of the purloined poop, whose name is Daniel Aldama. He no longer had the package by then.

“He dropped it as soon as he found out. He didn’t want nothing to do with it and kept on riding,” Ronel Newton of the Riverside Police Department said.

(Photo: Mike Zaremba’s Facebook page)