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Tag: cans

Metal fragments lead to Blue Buffalo recall — the fourth canned food recall this month

Blue buffaloBlue Buffalo is recalling some of its “healthy” and “holistic” canned dog food because it might contain pieces of metal.

It’s the second company this week to recall canned dog food due to concerns about metal fragments, and the third canned dog food recall this month.

Blue Buffalo’s CEO said in a statement on the company’s website that it is recalling the food as part of its “mission of bringing transparency to pet foods.”

(That from a company that paid $32 million last year to settle a lawsuit about its deceptive advertising.)

It’s kind of hard to find the “transparent” company’s statement on the company website, so here is the link.

“My father, brother and I founded Blue Buffalo with the mission of bringing transparency to pet foods, and so, even though it is highly unlikely that you will have a product affected by this problem, we felt that we needed to voluntarily withdraw the product from retailers and let you know that we were doing this,” CEO Billy Bishop says in a letter to customers.

The recalled product is Blue Buffalo Homestyle Recipe Healthy Weight Chicken Dinner with Garden Vegetables. The cans have a “best by” date of Aug. 3, 2019 and the UPC is 8-40243-10017-0

PetSmart this week announced recalls of both the Blue Buffalo product and cans of Grreat Choice chicken and rice dog food.

In both cases, the companies said there had been no reports of illness or injury as a result of the possible contamination.

In both cases, the lots came from suppliers not identified by the companies or in news reports. Dog food companies commonly outsource their manufacturing to multiple manufacturers.

Also this month, Evanger’s announced a recall of its Hunk of Beef canned dog food after some of it was found to contain a sedative used to euthanize animals.

That contamination led one dog to die and at least four more to become ill in Washington state.

recalled-Against-the-Grain-dog-foodYesterday, the FDA announced another dog food brand, Against the Grain, was recalling some cans of its Pulled Beef with Gravy Dinner for Dogs amid concerns it contains the same sedative.

Against the Grain appears to be a sister company of Evanger’s.

Food Safety News reported they may share manufacturing facilities and ingredients, and that the founders of Against the Grain are listed as the son and daughter of Evanger’s owners Holly and Joel Sher.

Chelsea Sher, who serves as vice president for exports at Evanger’s, is listed as owner of the Against the Grain trademark.

PetSmart recalls some cans of Grreat Choice

great-choice-chicken-and-rice-dog-food-recall6PetSmart has issued a recall on cans of its Grreat Choice dog food after a manufacturer informed the company of consumer complaints about finding pieces of metal that could cause a choking hazard to pets.

The product is sold nationwide at PetSmart retail stores and online at PetSmart.com, Pet360.com, and PetFoodDirect.com.

The dog food was sold between October 10, 2016 and Feb. 7, 2017 and has a “Best By” date of 8/5/19.

PetSmart said in a press release that only one lot of Grreat Choice chicken and rice dog food is affected by the recall.

No injuries or illnesses have been reported, the company said.

The cans have a lot number of 1759338, and a UPC code of 7-3725726116-7.

Neither the manufacturer or PetSmart have given any indication of how the metal pieces ended up in the food.

Customers who have purchased the recalled food are advised to stop feeding it to their pets and bring any remaining cans to a PetSmart store for a full refund or exchange.

For more information, consumers can contact PetSmart customer service at 1-888-839-9638 between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. CST

Dear me! Abby flubbed this one, readers say

Dog-Trash-CanIt seems I wasn’t the only one to disagree with “Dear Abby’s” recent opinion that throwing the bagged poopage of your dog into someone else’s garbage can was acceptable.

“I’m sorry to say my advice … landed me in the doghouse,” the columnist noted earlier this week.

Back in September, Abby advised “Pooped Out in North Carolina” — who was getting the business from his family after tossing his dog’s bagged feces in a neighbor’s garbage can — that “as long as the bag was securely sealed, I don’t think adding it to someone’s trash bin was a social no-no.”

ohmidog! quickly pounced on Abby for dispensing such bad advice. It’s bad manners and, worse yet, gives the anti-dog types something else to complain about.

As it turns out, we weren’t alone. Many others disagreed with Abby, and a sampling of those opinions were included in her column Monday.

“DEAR ABBY: … As a homeowner who is a frequent recipient of foreign feces, there is a practical issue that you may not have foreseen. Our garbage collectors will not dispose of small bags of dog poop; they will only take trash bags of the larger size one would expect to contain household waste,” wrote Frequent Feces Finder.

“DEAR ABBY: You should have told “Pooped” to check the local laws first. In my community, if you’re caught putting your trash in someone else’s container, you are made to clean it out, fined and sometimes given jail time,” wrote Tom in Reed City, Michigan.

“DEAR ABBY: We walk our dogs four times a day and place their carefully bagged “deposits” only in the trash at our house. We do this for two reasons: One, people can be territorial about their refuse containers and resent any ‘unauthorized’ garbage placed there. Two, many homeowners hate finding animal waste on their property or in their trash,” opined Picker-Upper in California.

(Photo from the flickr page of left-hand)