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Tag: cpr

Boxer brought back to life by trainer

A few minutes of doggie CPR brought some fame to a well-known Washington state dog trainer, some notoriety to the dog’s owner and — more important than either of those — new life for a 4-year-old boxer named Sugar.

Sugar and owner were attending an obedience lesson last weekend when the dog suffered a seizure and stopped breathing.

Ron Pace, 54, who owns Canyon Crest K9 Training Center in the Tacoma area, used a version of CPR to get Sugar breathing again — with everything after Sugar’s seizure being captured on videotape.

Sugar’s owner, Tiffany Kauth of Bremerton, has received numerous interview requests and some Internet fame, not all of it positive. Among those who have commented on the video on YouTube, many are critical of her crying during the traumatic experience.

Pace has been getting calls for interviews as well, the Tacoma News Tribune reports. “E-mails are coming in every five minutes, Facebook posts. It’s pretty amazing how quickly it can spread nowadays,” he said.

A dog trainer for 34 years, Pace helped launch the Tacoma Police K9 program. He also started a program that trains service dogs to assist people with diabetes.

In the video, Pace calmly checks the dog’s airway and continues doing chest compressions until Sugar finally moves.

Sugar was rushed to a veterinarian and has been diagnosed with a heart problem, for which he’s being treated, his owner said.

Owner revives pup in fire with mouth-to-snout

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Houston firefighters rescued three dogs from a burning apartment complex, including one pup that was resuscitated by its owner with mouth-to-snout resuscitation.

Authorities say two puppies and their mother were saved.

The cause of the fire, which left several units damaged, is under investigation. All of the residents were able to get out safely.

How to perform doggie CPR

A poll this week announced 63 percent of dog owners would be at least somewhat likely to perform mouth-to-snout resuscitation on their dog in an emergency. It didn’t report how many dog owners actually know how. My guess is fewer than 10 percent.

So here’s an ohmidog! rerun — a four-minute lesson on doggie CPR, as taught by Elaine Acker, CEO of Pets America:

1. If your dog is not breathing, use a finger to clear any mucus or other objects from the mouth. Tilt the head back to straighten the airway passage. Hold the mouth shut with one hand, and place your mouth over the dog’s nose and mouth, making sure the seal is tight.

2. Blow into the nose while watching to see if the chest expands.

3. If the chest does not expand, check and clear the dog’s mouth again, and start the procedure over.

4. If the chest does expand, release your dog’s mouth, allowing it to exhale.

5. Repeat the breathing procedure once every five seconds until your dog is breathing normally.

6. If your dog is not breathing and has no detectable heartbeat, and no other forms of help are available, cardiac resuscitation can be attempted.

7. To do this, put your dog on its right side and place the heel of your hand on the ribcage just behind the elbow. Put your other hand on top of the first hand. Firmly press on the ribcage in quick, smooth movements three to four times, using both hands. The compression should last no longer than half a second. The smaller the dog the fewer inches of compression and less force are needed. At all times take care not to damage the ribcage.

8. Repeat this procedure a total of 10 times. Then, if your DOG is not breathing, perform mouth-to-snout resuscitation again, alternating between 10 chest compressions and one breath into the dog’s nose.

Thanks to Pets America for the information.

Mouth to snout? Most of us would do it

Sixty-three percent of dog owners would be at least somewhat likely to perform CPR on their pet in the event of a medical emergency, according to an Associated Press-Petside.com poll.

Only 53 percent of cat owners were so inclined — but we won’t read anything into that.

The poll found that, while most pet owners were prepared to go to great lengths — even mouth-to-snout resuscitation — to save their pets, few are prepared to handle pet emergencies.

Just 20 percent of pet owners have a pet first aid kit in their home, and 54 percent do not have a fire evacuation plan for their pets.

Sixty-two percent of dog owners and a third of cat owners let their pets ride in their cars unrestrained, and 11 percent  sometimes leave their pets unattended in a car or truck. A fourth of pet owners, including 30 percent of dog owners and 22 percent of cat owners, sometimes give their pets bones from table scraps.

The poll revealed that 41 percent have experienced at least one pet safety emergency that required an emergency trip to a vet. More than one of every ten have had their pet hit by a car. About 7 percent of those polled said their pets have eaten something poisonous.

Among pet owners, women were more likely to say they would perform CPR on their pets than men –  65 percent to 50 percent, according to the poll.

But we won’t read anything into that, either.

(For a lesson in how to adminster CPR to a dog, click here.)

How to save your dog’s life

As promised, here’s a quick lesson on doggie CPR — a four-minute investment of your time that, while we hope you never have to use it, might pay off someday.

In the video above, Elaine Acker, CEO of Pets America, demonstrates the proper technique for performing CPR on pets.

Here, in a nutshell, is the drill:

If your dog is not breathing, use a finger to clear any mucus or other objects from the mouth. Tilt the head back to straighten the airway passage. Hold the mouth shut with one hand, and place your mouth over the dog’s nose and mouth, making sure the seal is tight.

Blow into the nose while watching to see if the chest expands.

If the chest does not expand, check and clear the dog’s mouth again, and start the procedure over.

If the chest does expand, release your dog’s mouth, allowing it to exhale.

Repeat the breathing procedure once every five seconds until your dog is breathing normally.

If your dog is not breathing and has no detectable heartbeat, and no other forms of help are available, cardiac resuscitation can be attempted.

To do this, put your dog on its right side and place the heel of your hand on the ribcage just behind the elbow. Put your other hand on top of the first hand. Firmly press on the ribcage in quick, smooth movements three to four times, using both hands. The compression should last no longer than half a second. The smaller the dog the fewer inches of compression and less force are needed. At all times take care not to damage the ribcage.

Repeat this procedure a total of 10 times. Then, if your DOG is not breathing, perform mouth-to-snout resuscitation again, alternating between 10 chest compressions and one breath into the dog’s nose.

Thanks to Pets America for the information.

Ohmidog! comment of the week

This week’s winner of our “comment of the week” contest is Marie, who coined a new word in her remarks pertaining to our entry on a dog’s near-deadly confrontation with a video game:

“Wii-suscitation”

It’s what you do when your dog, or a human for that matter, gets a little too close to those caught up in a Wii game and gets clobbered with the remote to the extent they need to be revived. You “Wii-suscitate” him.

As this week’s winner, Marie will be Wii-ceiving an ohmidog! sports bottle, though we suggest she let Anne drink from it as well. It was Anne’s earlier comment that Wii-sulted in Kelly’s counter-Wii-mark.

“We don’t have a Wii, and the Beagle has a thick skull, so I suspect chances of this happening at our house are wii-mote,” Anne wrote. She noted how some fire departments have begun to keep doggie oxygen masks on hand, to which Marie responded:

“It is great the local fire departments are starting to really keep an eye on pets. I would be terrified if my dogs wii-suscitation was in my hands.”

In addition to giving us a laugh, the exchange also gave us an idea — given all that uncertainty, even among dog nuts like Marie and Anne: an ohmidog! report on just how you can resuscitate a dog. Look for it in the near future.

And keep Wii-ding.

He wept dolefully, but was very goodKino closed his eyes were on foot and one of the graphical tools.