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Tag: dakota

Father of baby snatched by dog pens a book

ajThe Kentucky father whose 3-day-old son was snatched from a crib by the family’s wolf-hybrid dog last summer has written a book about the ordeal.

A spokesman for AuthorHouse, a Bloomington, Ind., company that specializes in self-publishing, confirmed to the Lexington Herald that the book will be published in late May.

Its mouthful of a title? “Could It Happen to You?:  Baby A.J.’s Story of Being Taken From His Crib by the Family Dog Dakota.”

“I think it’s going to answer a lot of questions about who we are,” said Michael Smith, who along with his wife, Chrissie, became the subject of nationwide TV coverage and news articles after their family dog snatched Alexander James “A.J.” Smith from his crib July 20.

Dakota, the female wolf hybrid that had a habit of taking objects from the house, carried the baby outside in her mouth, eventually setting him down in the woods behind the Smiths’ house north of Nicholasville.

A.J. was treated for a cracked skull, cracked ribs, a collapsed lung and a partially collapsed lung and returned home after several days.

Except for a small scar, he has recovered fully, the family says. “He’s a healthy little boy. He’s doing great.” Chrissie Smith said.

Michael Smith said the book will be a behind-the-scenes narrative of the ordeal that included his interviews with Diane Sawyer on ABC’s “Good Morning America” and Deborah Norville on “Inside Edition.”

The book, he said, will clear up any notion that he’s an unfit parent.

The Smiths were investigated for child neglect, but a Jessamine County grand jury found no criminal intent.

The family attempted to get Dakota back, but eventually consented to letting the dog live with another family.

The Smiths still have two dogs, one of them a wolf-hybrid.

Father of baby-napping dog wants it back

The Kentucky couple whose dog carried their infant son from a bassinet into the woods behind their home, causing criticial injuries to the child, now wants the wolf hybrid returned home, authorities said Friday.

Jessamine County Attorney Brian Goettl told the Lexington Herald-Leader that a court order will be needed before Dakota the dog is returned to Michael Smith, of Jessamine County.

“I’m concerned about the safety of the child, and we are going to be reviewing the situation over the weekend to see what can be done to ensure the safety of the child,” Goettl said.

Smith had previously told reporters that Dakota would not return to his house. News that the dog might go back to the Smiths’ home came on the same day that the Jessamine County Sheriff’s Office said it had closed its investigation of the July 20 incident.

The baby, Alexander James “A.J.” Smith was 3 days old on July 20 when Dakota, a female wolf-dog hybrid, picked him up and carried him outside the Smiths’ Jessamine County home.

The baby suffered a cracked skull, cracked ribs, and a collapsed lung. He was in critical condition for several days at University of Kentucky Hospital, but has recovered and is back  home.

Michael Smith said at an earlier press conference that he hoped Dakota could be adopted by another owner: “Obviously, Dakota is not coming back into my house.”

The dog remains at the Jessamine County SAVE Center, the animal shelter for dogs and cats in Nicholasville, director Jenise Smith said.

Baby recovering, dog will live on, too

The sad and disturbing case of the infant who was critically injured when he was snatched from his bassinet and carried to the woods by the family dog, now appears headed for a happy ending.

The baby, A.J., is home from the hospital, and is expected to recover fully. Meanwhile, Dakota, the 4-year-old “Native American Indian Dog, ” remains under the care of Jessamine County Animal Control’s SAVE Center where they are working to find him a home, ZooToo reports.

“We’ve had some nice offers from private homes,” said Jenise Smith, the center’s director.

At the time of the incident, in Nicholasville, Ky., just outside Lexington, AJ was just 3-days-old, having arrived home from the hospital on Sunday, July 19. He was snagged by the dog the next day, and spent nearly a week at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington, suffering two collapsed lungs, a skull fracture, broken ribs and various cuts and bruises.

The 4-year-old dog is one of three the family has had for years. Dakota had never shown signs of aggression to the family’s two other children, the Smiths said. The dog has she shown no signs of violence since being taken from the family.

On a less uplifiting note, the SAVE Center reported hearing that scammers were apparently at work, fraudulently attempting to raise money for Dakota. SAVE officials issued a statement last week explaining that “any other websites, emails, etc, soliciting donations for Dakota are NOT connected to the SAVE Center.”

Baby snatched by family dog slowly improving

The baby in Kentucky who was injured when dragged outside by the family dog is slowly improving, and his condition has been upgraded to critical.

Alexander James Smith, A.J. for short, was pulled from his bassinet, which makes more sense the original reports that he was removed from his crib, by the family dog, Dakota, at the family’s home in Jessamine County. The dog dragged him about 200 yards into the woods behind the house.

The baby suffered collapsed lungs, a fractured skull and broken ribs among other injuries. His father , Michael Smith, said the dog won’t be coming back to their home, but that he hoped it might be able to find a new one.

The dog is still under quarantine at the Jessamine County Save Center, which reports having received hundreds of calls have flooded the Jessamine County Save Center wanting to adopt the dog.

“I appreciate the concern and the outpouring of support, even from complete strangers,” Smith said. “It has been overwhelming and really comforting and helped us get through this difficult time.”

Baby critical after dog drags it from house

A four-day-old child dragged out of his crib and into the yard by the family dog remained in critical condition yesterday at University of Kentucky Hospital in Lexington.

Michael Smith and his wife Chrissie say when they checked on their baby Monday afternoon, he was not in his crib.

Smith told the Associated Press he headed to the family’s wooded, two-acre backyard, knowing that Dakota, a mixed breed described as a “Native American Indian Dog,” had a reputation for stealing household items and depositing them there.

Smith said when he found the dog, it was treating the baby, named Alexander James Smith, as a puppy and wasn’t being vicious.

Despite that, the infant suffered two collapsed lungs, a skull fracture, broken ribs and cuts and bruises.

Jessamine County chief deputy sheriff Allen Peel said no charges had been filed, but the case remains under investigation. He said he expects the dog, named Dakota, to be destroyed by animal control, which took him into custody Monday.

Smith said the 4-year-old was one of three dogs the family had owned since they were puppies and he had no history of aggression or problems with Smith’s two other children from a previous marriage.

Life sentence given in killing of police dog

A man who shot and killed a police dog was sentenced to life in prison last week — not so much because he killed a police dog, but because it was his third strike, according to a report in the Seattle Times.

Ronald J. Chenette, convicted six months ago of killing Dakota, a 5-year-old German shepherd owned by the Vancouver Police Department, was sentenced Friday in Clark County Superior Court in Vancouver, Washington — a state where conviction of a third violent crime mandates a life sentence.

The day Dakota was shot, Chenette “got his hands on a couple of beers and a handgun,” court-appointed defense attorney Jeff Barrar said. A friend of Chenette’s called 911 and said Chenette was threatening to kill police. SWAT officers were called out to a wooded area with a steep gully, which would have been difficult for the two-legged officers to navigate. So Dakota went in.

Soon, officers heard a gunshot. Chenette said he fought with Dakota for more than a minute before he fired. He said he thought Dakota was going for his throat and was going to kill him. “All I have to say is, I’m sorry about the dog that got shot,” Chenette said.

Deputy Prosecutor Scott Jackson said the sentence wasn’t “freakish or unfair or unconstitutional” since Chenette’s first two violent crimes were against humans.