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Tag: dead

Your dog is loyal — your smartphone is not

If you have a few years on you, you remember the stool pigeon from old black and white movies.

He was a jumpy fellow, usually, maybe with a twitch, ready to rat out a fellow con in exchange for a few bucks, a bottle of gin, or a break on his sentence.

He was usually less than totally trustworthy, and he usually came to a bad end.

In today’s full color, technology-obsessed world, there’s a new, far more reliable, stool pigeon.

He’s far easier to access than meeting up in a smoky bar. He has a photographic memory. He has the goods on you. And he’ll dish that information out to the coppers with just the push of a few buttons.

He is generally one of two varieties — Apple or Android.

When Pennsylvania State Police in Harrisburg found the bodies of two boxer mixes near the roadway, and learned through a tip who they belonged to, the suspect’s cell phone provided virtually all the information needed to make their case.

On it, they found texts to his wife which included his messages that “someone called the cops and told them I killed them” and “do not tell the state police anything.”

They also found he had been googling — 82 incriminating cell phone searches that included “how to destroy your house pet,” “is it legal to kill your dog,” and “punishment for killing your dog in PA.”

Bryan Gardner, 47, was charged with aggravated cruelty to animals, cruelty to animals, and neglect of animals after the dogs were discovered, back in March, in a ditch in Middle Paxton Township.

One dog had a gunshot wound to the abdomen, and the other had significant trauma to its head and stomach.

In an interview with police, Gardner denied any involvement with the killing or dumping of the dogs, and told his interviewer “you don’t have anything,” according to a criminal complaint.

PennLive.com reports that Gardner told officers the dogs ran off while he was walking them.

Investigators spoke with Gardner’s wife, Andrea, who said her husband told her he gave the dogs away. Andrea refused to take a polygraph test or allow police to review text messages between her and her husband.

Police then obtained a search warrant for Gardner’s cell phone records, and officers found the text messages.

The web searches were made both before an after Gardner was initially confronted by police, according to the complaint.

If the warrant to get his phone holds up in court, he faces a bit of an uphill battle.

Good, you might say, and you might be right.

There are arguments to be made about privacy, too, but for now we will make these two conclusions:

One, smartphones, like computers, have made it much easier to pull off a host of bad deeds — from scams to affairs and with the Internet serving as accomplice — but they have also made it a whole lot easier to get caught.

Two, this guy’s smartphone showed itself to be about as loyal to him as he (allegedly) was to his dogs.

Newest “World’s Ugliest Dog” dies at age 9

Sixteen days after winning the title of “World’s Ugliest Dog,” Zsa Zsa, a 9-year-old English bulldog, has died.

Zsa Zsa won the 30th annual contest on June 23. She passed way in her sleep Monday night, her owner, Megan Brainard, told the Star Tribune.

With her floppy tongue, crooked teeth, pronounced underbite and squished in face, Zsa Zsa captured the hearts of the judges at the annual contest at the Sonoma-Marin County Fair in Petaluma, California, which bestows the dubious honor annually.

zsa-zsa-today-tease-180625_f6982e248fea6a466e6e3f64763a2512.fit-560wThe contest describes itself as “all in fun,” and a way to promote dog adoption.

It has some hard core fans, some hard core contestants, and some critics, too, who say the competition has become a little too cut-throat, and too often features unhealthy, sickly and deformed dogs.

Some years, winning dogs have been expected abuse victims, or been given points for an “oozing sore.”

Nevertheless, it is greeted every year by the news media with puns and laughs.

After winning the annual contest in California, Zsa Zsa was flown to New York for an appearance on the morning shows, including NBC’s “Today Show” and “Fox & Friends.”

Brainard, of Anoka, Minnesota, adopted Zsa Zsa after spotting her on Petfinder. The dog had previously been rescued from a puppy mill in Missouri when she was five years old.

Brainard said she named Zsa Zsa after the Hungarian actress Zsa Zsa Gabor, as the pup enjoyed lounging on the couch “like a beautiful model.”

Dog who played Duke, that sarcastic golden retriever in Bush’s beans commercials, dies

Duke, the Bush’s Baked Beans dog, has died — one of them, anyway.

Just before the July 4 holiday, Sam, a golden retriever from Florida, passed away. He was one of several dogs that appeared as “Duke” in television ads.

His death became known when a neighbor of his owner, in Apopka, posted the news on Facebook.

Subsequently, the bean company expressed its sadness on social media.

“We continue to be overwhelmed by fan interest and their love of Duke. The relationship between Jay and his beloved dog Duke is the embodiment of the BUSH’S brand, and has been a part of our family story for more than 20 years,” the company wrote in a Facebook post on Tuesday. “During that time, we’ve worked closely with several dogs who portrayed Duke in our commercials, including Sam. While Sam has not worked with us in years, we are saddened by the news of his passing and are grateful to have had him depict Duke. Because Duke is iconic to BUSH’S and so adored by our fans, we will continue to use him in our ads.”

Sam’s owner, Susan, who trains animals to work in commercials, had him put down. He was suffering from cancer, CBS reported.

dukeOdom shared a photo of Sam sitting in the grass, with an American flag flying behind him. “Here is a photo from his better days. He was a very special dog to all who ever knew or had the pleasure of meeting him. He is and will be missed,” Odom wrote.

Sam’s character “Duke” is known for making sarcastic comments to his “owner,” Jay, in the company’s commercials. A human voices his lines in the ads, many of which deal with dog’s seeming willingness to divulge the the Bush’s secret family recipe.

Give the Fourth of July is a major bean-eating holiday, his death hit home with many, who took to social media to express their sorrow.

Miss Babe Ruth, the Greensboro Grasshoppers beloved bat dog, dies of cancer

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Miss Babe Ruth, the popular black Lab who served as the Greensboro Grasshoppers bat dog for nearly 10 years, died Friday night of cancer.

“Our hearts are broken,” said Donald Moore, Grasshoppers president and general manager. “She had an incredible life. She was all you could want from a dog and more. She loved people, loved kids. She was very loyal. That dog knew she was putting on a show, and she did it with such dignity. There will never be another Babe.”

The Moore family owned Babe, as they did her brother, Master Yogi Berra, who died last year, also of cancer, at age 9.

Miss Babe Ruth retired in 2015, taking a final lap around the bases even though she was having difficulty walking by then.

The two dogs were fixtures at Hoppers games. The dogs delivered buckets of baseballs to the umpire, retrieved Grasshopper bats and ran the bases when the game is over.

Babe was diagnosed with inoperable cancer but to the surprise of everyone, veterinarians included, lived another two years.

Babe came out of retirement late in the 2016 season and worked eight final games while her niece, current Hoppers batdog Miss Lou Lou Gehrig, recovered from an illness. The team estimates Babe delivered more than 3,500 baseballs and fetched more than 4,600 bats.

“She fought an incredible fight,” Moore said. “We didn’t think she would see opening day, but we had her for four more months. You try to prepare for this. But as hard as you try to prepare, no matter what you do, when it comes it devastates you.”

Babe’s health deteriorated rapidly in the last two days, the Greensboro News & Record reported.

“Up until (Thursday) night, she seemed to be OK,” Moore said. “She was taking her medicine, eating well, barking and talking junk like she always did. She was happy. But all of a sudden, it was like a switch flipped. She told us in her own way, ‘I can’t do it anymore.’ She stopped eating. She didn’t want to drink anything. It was clear she was ready to go.”

Memorial contributions can be made to either the Babe and Yogi Scholarship Endowment at N.C. State’s College of Veterinary Medicine, 1060 William Moore Drive, Raleigh, N.C. 27607 or to Greensboro Grasshoppers Charities, c/o the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro, 330 S. Greene St., Suite 100, Greensboro, N.C. 27401.

The scholarship at N.C. State is earmarked for Guilford County residents who are veterinary students at the university.

Funds from the Grasshoppers Charities donations will go to establishing permanent memorials of Babe and Yogi at First National Bank Field.

(Photo by Jack Horan / Charlotte Observer)

United Airlines kills another dog

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United Airlines is admitting a flight attendant violated policy by insisting a passenger place her dog in an overhead bin during a flight from Houston to New York.

The dog was found dead in its carrier after the flight landed at LaGuardia Airport Monday night.

In a statement, United called the dog’s death a “tragic accident.”

Spokesman Charlie Hobart told CNN a flight attendant should not have told the passenger to put the dog in the bin used for carry-on bags.

“We assume full responsibility for this tragedy and express our deepest condolences to the family and are committed to supporting them,” the airline said Tuesday. “We are thoroughly investigating what occurred to prevent this from ever happening again.”

The death occurred after a passenger brought the dog, identified as a 10-month-old French bulldog, on board in a TSA-approved pet carrier.

After the passenger took a seat, a United flight attendant insisted that the carrier — and dog — be stowed in an overhead bin, according to at least one witness.

Maggie Gremminger said the traveler with the dog protested the attendant’s order to put the pet carrier into the overhead bin, but that the attendant persisted.

Gremminger posted a photo of the grieving woman on Twitter (above) after the flight.

“The passenger adamantly refused but the flight attendant went on with the instruction,” Gremminger wrote. “At the end of the flight – the dog was found dead in the carrier. I am heart broken right now.”

united2United and other airlines generally allow pets to be carried on board provided they’re in carriers that can fit under the seat in front of the owner. Of all airlines, United has the worst pet safety record.

According to a recent U.S. Department of Transportation report, 24 animals died in the care of U.S. carriers last year. Three-quarters of those, 18, died while being handled by United. Of 15 reported injuries, 13 occurred with United.

The airline is the largest transporter of animals, carrying 138,178 animals in 2017. Alaska Airlines, which transported the next-highest number of animals (114,974), had an incident rate of 0.26, one-tenth of United’s industry-leading rate of 2.24 for every 10,000 animals transported.

Several of the animals had pre-existing health issues, the report said, and some incidents happened before the animals were put on planes.

A United spokeswoman said the airline has been in contact with the passenger who owned the dog and offered to pay for a necropsy.

(Photo: Maggie Gremminger/Twitter)

Michigan funeral home holds service for dog who comforted thousands of the grieving

holly1

Hollie, a golden retriever who for 16 years comforted mourners at a Kalamazoo funeral home, was remembered yesterday with a ceremony in her honor.

Betzler Life Story Funeral Home held an open house for the therapy dog they believe to have been the first used in Michigan by a funeral home.

While more funeral homes have begun having therapy dogs on the premises, Betzler’s started their program at a time it was mostly unheard of.

Scott Betzler, Hollie’s owner, got the idea while he served on the board of directors of the Kalamazoo Humane Society. That organization offered a pet visitation program for nursing homes at the time, and Betzler decided to try to incorporate it at the funeral home.

“It was very different at the time to have a dog in a funeral home,” said Patrick Bauschke, a funeral director at Betzler. “But Hollie made it the most natural fit. She’s worked thousands of funerals and visitations and helped countless people.”

“Mention the Betzler name and chances are people will remember Hollie,” he added. “She happily greeted people at the door, mingled throughout visitations and services, and offered a calming and comforting influence on those who needed her most.”

Bauschke said Hollie had a soothing effect on visitors — “an unmatched sense of knowing just who needed her and when.”

holly2MLive reported that setting aside some time for people to remember and honor Hollie was an obvious idea.

“So many people have adored her, it is a time for people to come in and visit,” Funeral Director Joe Buysse said. “We have so many people who say, ‘I remember when I was here for Grandma or Uncle Charlie and she was here. She was a big comfort to me when I was a kid. Now I’m grown up.’ It is amazing how she has touched so many people.”

Hollie completed temperance training through the Kalamazoo Humane Society and was the first official funeral home therapy dog in the Greater Kalamazoo and Paw Paw areas.

Her work was featured in articles by the International Cemetery Cremation and Funeral Association, the Michigan Funeral Directors Association and the Kalamazoo Gazette.

She was often taken on visits to local senior communities, and visited elementary schools for book-reading sessions with children.

You can read more about Hollie’s life here.

With Hollie’s passing, the funeral home says her role will be taken over by Ellie, a 3-year-old English retriever who has been working alongside her.

(Photos: Betzler Life Story Funeral Home)

Western Kentucky weather dog passes away

Radar the Weather Dog — voted Bowling Green’s best television personality for nine years in a row — passed away Christmas morning at age 16.

Julie Milam, general manager at WNKY, broke the news to staff at the end of the station’s morning news program Tuesday, the Bowling Green Daily News reported.

“It’s a very sad and somber day at our station,” she said. “It is a great loss at our station for every employee and the community as a whole.”

A shelter pet, Radar was rescued from the Bowling Green-Warren County Humane Society in 2005. He was introduced as the station’s weather dog, appeared in forecasts with the meteorologist and lived at the station full time up until two years ago.

radarThe purebred border collie was a friendly dog who would roam about the station and greet visitors. When the time came for the weather report though, “he knew to be in that chair (and) be still,” Milam said. “He would bark on command.”

Radar gained additional fame at various community events, including his appearances at the annual Fur Ball that benefits the humane society.

Radar would go home with various members of the staff on weekends, and there were often arguments about who would get to take him home.

Eventually, he moved in full time with Marilyn Gardner, her two dogs and her foster kittens.

“He was a very loyal and sweet and funny character,” she said.

From 2008 to 2017, Radar was voted Bowling Green’s best television personality by Daily News and Amplifier readers as part of the annual Best of Bowling Green poll.

Radar’s adopted sister, SOKY, has taken over some of his station duties. She was also adopted from Logan County through the Bowling Green-Warren County Humane Society.

Lorri Hare, the shelter director, said Radar’s celebrity did wonders for promoting animal adoption.

“You can find great dogs here at the shelter every day,” she said. “He’ll be missed by a lot of us for sure. He lived a great life. A lot of people loved him.”

A public memorial is planned for February, according to WNKY.