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Tag: dog photography

More stunning dog photography

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A Moscow-based husband-and-wife photography team has released another series of dog portraits, and it’s just as spectacular as the first.

Alexander Khokhlov and Veronica Ershova have been a team for years — he taking the pictures, she doing the post-production work — but it was only last year that they turned their attention to dogs.

Intended to visually “explore the wonderful world of our four-legged friends,” The Dog Show, Season 2 continues to showcase dogs in photos that show them in expressive poses that highlight their individual spirit.

This year’s subjects include a Bedlington terrier, a pug, a weimaraner, a Basenji (above), and pictured below, this Australian shepherd.

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This Newfoundland, bloodhound, and trio of xolos were equally striking.

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Khokhlov was born in Calcutta, India. He is now based in Moscow and works as a commercial photographer in creative duo with designer and retouching expert Ershova.

Alexander’s works and interviews are featured in world mass media including CNN, Town & Country, PDN Magazine, Scientific American MIND, Professional Photographer, Talk Magazine, Huffington Post, The Daily Mail, Wired, Holland Herald, Stern, 20 minutos, Quotation, Life magazine, Petapixel.com, Phlearn.com and others.

You can see a much wider selection at mymodernmet.com, and even more at alexanderkhokhlov.com.

Dog Photographer of the Year contest


The UK Kennel Club has announced the winners of the 2018 Dog Photographer of the Year contest, and is showing off some stunning photographs of some stunning dogs.

The international contest, in its 13th year, drew almost 10,000 entries across 70 different countries.

It picks winners in ten categories: portrait, man’s best friend, dogs at play, dogs at work, puppy, oldies, assistance dogs, rescue dogs, I love dogs because (for entrants aged between 12 and 17 years old), and young pup photographer (for entrants aged 11 and under).

The overall top prize, or best in show, so to speak, (above) went to Dutch photographer Monica van der Maden for her image of Noa, an elderly Great Dane, titled “The Lady of the Mystery Forest.” It was entered into the oldies category.

“This picture was made in the early morning in the forest,” van der Maden said. “I wanted to photograph her in a position where she was sitting relaxed next to a tree … she turned her head to the left to her owner and this was the moment where you could see her soul.”

German photographer Klaus Dyber won the puppies category with an equally soulful and artistic close-up shot of Ceylin, a 3-month-old Italian Greyhound.


Israeli photographer Elinor Roizman won first prize in the dogs at play category for her image of Lili, the Pomeranian, chasing a giant bubble on the beach; UK-based Tracy Kidd’s group shot of spaniels and retrievers won the dogs at work category; and the man’s best friend category was won by Portugal’s Joana Matos for her image of a dog and a man at the beach.

Here’s a look at some of the winning entries.

Dogs at Work, by Tracy Kidd

First place, dogs at work, by Tracy Kidd

1st place portrait

First place, portrait, by Carol Durrant

1st place, dogs at play, by Elinor Roizman

First place, dogs at play, by Elinor Roizman

1st place, man's best friend, by Joana Matos

First place, man’s best friend, by Joana Matos

All of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd prize winning images for each category will be on display at The Kennel Club, London from July 16th until October 5th 2018. You can see all of the winning photos and find out more about the competition on The Kennel Club website.

(Photos: UK Kennel Club)

Dogs looking skeptical

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These dogs appear to share a common expression, something akin to what we humans might call skepticism.

But the German photographer who put together the collection of outtakes from photo sessions in her studio calls it, “Dogs questioning the photographer’s sanity.”

And who’s to say they aren’t?

Elke Vogelsang, also known as Wieselblitz, is a photographer of dogs who specializes in portraits — but not the kind of portraits dog owners traditionally look for.

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Instead, she likes to capture them mid-expression — even though she knows what we humans see in those expressions may not be what the dogs are expressing at all.

“I usually prefer the pictures, which don’t look like that one portrait the owner would hang on his wall. I like the outtakes, the bewildered, quirky expressions,” she said in a post on Bored Panda.

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What the photos she posted had in common, she said, is that “the dogs look like they think that the photographer lost her mind.”

“With my dog portraits I try to explore the different expressions and characters of dogs. It’s all about emotions and personality. I love the challenge to get funny, silly or sometimes even melancholic expressions.

“Of course, these are snapshots, a moment in time, captured in a fraction of a second. Often we have our own interpretation of those expressions. The dogs appear to be laughing or smiling or they look sad. Like all dog lovers I’m guilty of humanizing them. But yes, dogs do feel all emotions humans feel, too.”

For more information on Vogelsang and her photography, visit her website or Facebook page.

The dog who thinks he’s frame-worthy


My dog Ace is always pretty cooperative — you might even say a ham — when it comes to having his picture taken.

But last week he went so far as to provide not just the photo op, but the frame.


We were wandering around historic Reynolda Village in Winston-Salem, where he generally checks each shop’s doorstep for water bowls or treats, then peers inside to see if anything of interest — i.e., food related — is going on.

When we came to Village Smith Galleries, an art and framing shop, it was closed, but Ace hopped up on a bench at the entrance. Both sides of the front step were surrounded by lattice, allowing opportunities for him to present his good sides (and there are many) in a pre-framed manner.

In case you can’t read it, that bandana he’s wearing — he got it as a going-away gift — says “I’m smarter than your honor student.”

Sometimes I wonder how true that might be.