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Tag: dogs in advertising

Woof in Advertising: Bouncing boxer

Nothing in the UK says the holiday season is here (and says it more prematurely) quite like the annual appearance of the new Christmas ad from John Lewis.

The chain of upscale department stores goes all out on the yearly ads — presenting memorable ads that range from the soul-recharging to tear-inducing to heart-wrenching.

woof-in-advertisingThis year they’ve gone with the tale of a little girl who wants a trampoline for Christmas and her dog, who — after viewing assorted wildlife try it out the night before — is the first to jump on it Christmas morning.

Buster is played by a real dog, named Biff.

His acrobatics, though, are accomplished with the use of CGI. So too are the playful antics of the wildlife menagerie that tries the trampoline out the night before, including two foxes, two squirrels, a badger and a hedgehog.

The department store spent £ 1 million to make the ad, and will spend a total of £ 6 million on the campaign.

The ad, with the tagline “Gifts that everyone will love,” represents a return to gentle comedy after last year’s sentimental story of a lonely old man stuck on the moon.

As with previous ad campaigns, this one also raises money for a charity —
the Wildlife Trusts will get 10% of sales of stuffed toy versions of the animals.

The ad is being launched today, kicking off a campaign that will include various social media tie-ins and apps.

Visitors to John Lewis’s Oxford Street store will be able to try a virtual reality version of the trampoline, where they can bounce alongside the animals using Oculus Rift goggles, The Guardian reported.

John Lewis says its Christmas ad campaigns have fueled an average 16% increase in holiday sales.

(Woof in Advertising is a recurring ohmidog! feature that looks at how dogs are used in marketing. You can find earlier posts in this archived collection.)

Woof in Advertising: Snoopy gets the axe

MetLife has given Snoopy his walking papers.

After proudly serving the insurance company for 30 years, Snoopy is being put out to pasture as part of a company-wide “refresh” aimed at portraying MetLife as more sophisticated and financially savvy.

The beagle who has been appearing in MetLife ads since the 1980’s is not the sort of symbol they say they now need.

woof-in-advertising“We brought in Snoopy over 30 years ago to make our company more friendly and approachable during a time when insurance companies were seen as cold and distant,” said chief marketing officer Esther Lee.

“Snoopy helped drive our business and served an important role at the time,” she added. “We have great respect for these iconic characters. However, as we focus on our future, it’s important that we associate our brand directly with the work we do and the partnership we have with our customers.”

In other words, Snoopy and the Peanuts gang — as loved and symbolic as they are — are not the kind of symbols the company wants representing them in these times of doing whatever is necessary to make all the money you can possibly make.

You’ve got to admit, the Peanuts characters have never been known for their financial savvy.

lucyI mean 5 cents for psychiatric advice? That’s not going to bring in the kind of profits American corporations now insist on.

Making obscene profits, and being able to talk with saying anything, are vital skills for the modern day American company.

MetLife seems to have that second part down. It’s not until the bottom of its press release about ushering in a new era that the company press release mentions the phasing out of Snoopy and the Peanuts gang — not until after they go on and on (and on) about their bold new company logo.

It’s the letter “M” — but not just any “M.”

“MetLife’s new visual branding is built around a clean, modern aesthetic,” the press release says. “The striking new brandmark brings contemporary blue and green colors together in a symbol of partnership to form an M for MetLife.

“The iconic MetLife blue carries forth the brand’s legacy, but has been brightened and now lives alongside a new color – green – which represents life, renewal and energy. The broader MetLife brand palette expands to include a range of vibrant secondary colors, reflecting the diverse lives of its customers.”

Zzzzzzzz. Good grief! AAUGH!!!

aaughThere will be no more Snoopy in MetLife ads (but we’ll stay tuned for the exciting adventures of that “M”).

And Snoopy will no longer appear on the MetLife blimp.

Don’t cry too much for him, though.

He has plenty on his plate, or in his bowl.

PETA has offered him a job, at least in a tongue in cheek way, as mascot of its doghouse donation program.

Likely, he won’t jump at that, because he’s already sitting pretty. He — or at least descendants of his creator — still reap profits from arrangements with Hallmark, Warner Bros. and Target, CNN reports.

The Peanuts brand has more than 700 licensing agreements in about 100 countries, according to SEC filings. Iconix Brand Group (ICON) partnered with the family of Charles M. Schulz to buy the brand from two publishing houses for $175 million in 2010.

His TV specials will probably be watched by our great great grandchildren.

And he still has his gig with the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Snoopy has floated down Broadway 39 times, more than any other character.

Let’s see an “M” do that.

(Woof in Advertising is a recurring ohmidog! feature that looks at how dogs are used in marketing. You can find earlier posts in this archived collection.)

Woof in Advertising: Olympic Mer-mutts

Just in time for the Olympics, Farmers Insurance has come out with a new series of ads featuring dogs making the best of a flooded home.

woof in advertisingThe latest in the Farmers “We Know From Experience” campaign, the ads feature dogs as athletes, competing in events that include diving and synchronized swimming.

The venue? The living room of a home that flooded after one of the dogs turned on the kitchen faucet, causing the sink to overflow.

That part of it, Farmers says, is based on a real claim.

The “Mer-Mutts,” as they are becoming known, are featured together and in separate spots featuring the dives of each — complete with commentary.

You can find all of them here.

Oscar winning actor J.K. Simmons introduces the ad, calling the event a combination of “form, grace and ill-behaved dogs.”



(You can find more of our Woof in Advertising posts here.)

Woof in Advertising: What the dog knows

This new ad campaign for a dog food company in Brazil is neither warm nor fuzzy.

Instead, it’s a little macabre — and aimed at persuading you that you should feed your pooch Special Dog brand dog food because, otherwise, he might share your secrets with the world.

woof in advertisingCreated by Rio agency DM9DDB, it centers around the idea that your dog has gathered a lot of insider information about your lifestyle in the time you’ve spent together.

In the spot above, for example, a Great Dane confronts his owner in bondage gear.

And in the one below, a Pomeranian catches his owner adding some of her deceased husband’s ashes to her tea.

And in what’s probably the most distasteful one of all, a pug becomes even more bug-eyed after he sees his owner sniffing his own fingers after engaging in some groin related couch behavior.

The message is your dog sees all, and knows all, so you better treat him right.

Kinda gross. Kinda funny. Not the kind of information a dog food customer is looking for, but you must admit they kind of stick in your head.

Woof in Advertising: Dream Weekend

Bored as I’ve become with the whole “bucket list” concept — for humans and dogs — I couldn’t help but being impressed with Subaru’s Impreza ad.

Subaru turns to dogs for its advertising more than any car maker — and continues to put out better ones than any car maker, even as other companies begin to catch on to the power pooches have in marketing.

This one reminded me of the year-long trip and Ace took across America five years ago, We didn’t called it a bucket list, preferring to have the fun we had before our bones got too creaky, and before one or both of us was on death’s doorstep.

(We called it Travels with Ace. It never turned into a published book, but you can read almost all of it here.)

woof in advertisingThis ad (extended version) for the 2016 Impreza tells the story of a man and his aging dog having one last journey and completing a “bucket list” of treats for the dog.

Those include a brand new show to chew on, an unauthorized dip in a motel pool, a bone for the dog’s 14th birthday, reuniting with an ex-lover and more — all with Willie Nelson singing in the background.

The tag line: “It’s not just the miles in life; it’s what you make of them.”

Carmichael Lynch, the advertising agency, cast an 11-year-old rescue dog named Monkey in the lead role.

Willie Nelson, an avid animal rights activist, gave the agency permission to use the song — “I’ve Loved You All Over the World” — at a reduced rate.

Subaru launched the spot last July.

You can find more of our “Woof in Advertising” posts — looking at how dogs are used in marketing — here.

This year’s Super Bowl ads left me cold

mountain-dew-super-bowl-commercial-2016

This year’s crop of Super Bowl ads was disappointing — and not just because there weren’t enough commercials with dogs in them.

I counted two ads in which dogs played a significant role, compared to nearly a dozen featuring celebrities, among them Alec Baldwin, Jeff Goldblum, Helen Mirren, Amy Schumer, Anthony Hopkins, Seth Rogen, Christopher Walken, Kevin Hart, Willem Dafoe, Liam Neeson, Ryan Reynolds and Drake.

woof in advertisingThat seemed to be the theme — if there was one — to this year’s ads: Let’s get some overexposed celebrities and expose them a little more.

And throw in a dizzying amount of special effects.

Yes, there was that stampede of dachshunds, all in hot dog costumes, making a mad dash for the Heinz family of condiments:

And there were those dogs scheming on how to get their paws on some of the Doritos displayed in the grocery store.

Neither of those knocked me out, and they pale in comparison with some of the far more funny, far more human, dog ads of previous Super Bowls.

Several other ads featured dogs in small supporting roles — in an ad with singing sheep, and in one where a town seems to occupied nearly entirely by clones of Ryan Reynolds (as if we’re not already seeing enough of the real one of him).

Then, too, a dog was part — and I do mean part — of my least favorite dog-related Super Bowl ad.

Mountain Dew, in an ad for its new beverage, Kick Start, unveiled a puppy-monkey-baby that looked like it would be more at home in a bad acid trip. I can only assume its creators had a little too much Kick Start during their creative process.

I didn’t keep a tally, but I’m pretty sure monstrous or otherwise fictional creatures far outnumbered dogs in this year’s ads — just as special effects far outnumbered moments of humanity, and flash far outdistanced substance.

I won’t show you the worst of them — that pink blob of bulging intestines wandering the stadium in search of a free bathroom. Nor will I mention the name the prescription drug it advertised. I’ll just remind you that Super Bowl ads cost $5 million per spot — and that’s just for the time.

Throw in the production costs involved with having a celebrity or animated intestinal blob tout your product and you’ll begin to understand why you probably won’t be paying bargain prices for anti-diarrhea meds or your next Hyundai.

All in all, Super Bowl ads this year left me unimpressed, feeling a little cold, and feeling a little old. They often left me creeped out — and I include the “Super Bowl babies” in that group. (Is the NFL so hard up for something to brag about that it must boast that the big game makes people copulate?)

This year’s ads left me longing for some of those ads of previous years — when dogs were dogs, and men were men, and internal organs stayed inside us.

Not being a big fan of talking dogs, dogs in costume, or dogs being part of some monstrous hyperactive multi-species hybrid, I didn’t really have a favorite dog ad among them.

Instead, I’d have to give this year’s top honors to the Subaru ads featured during the Puppy Bowl.

(You can find more of our Woof in Advertising posts here.)

Woof in Advertising: The Barkleys are back

It’s that (one) time of year that we get excited about commercials — and while those that air during the Super Bowl always get the most hype, Subaru is again focusing its advertising efforts on the Puppy Bowl.

Five new ads showcasing the Barkleys, the family of retrievers that first rolled onto the scene in 2013, will be airing in coming weeks and during Puppy Bowl XII on Animal Planet.

The ads are part of Subaru’s “Dog Tested Dog Approved” campaign.

woof in advertisingThe national television spots were created by Carmichael Lynch on behalf of Subaru of America, which is marking its sixth year as the event’s official auto sponsor.

The ads do a great job of intertwining quirky human behavior and quirky dog behavior with some highly laughable results.

In “Phone Navigation,” the Barkleys try to communicate with their smartphone voice assistant, but run into a bit of a language barrier.

“Puppy” shows the Barkleys taking a nighttime drive to try to get their little one to sleep.

And in “Bad Hair Day” Dad picks up Mom from the hair salon and is unsure what to make of her makeover.

Subaru has long been at the forefront of car companies catering to dog owners.

“Subaru and its customers have a deep connection to pets. Eight out of 10 Subaru owners are pet owners, and our brand continues to support the causes and initiatives that our customers care about,” said Alan Bethke, vice president of marketing at Subaru of America.

You can see more of the ads here, and learn more about Subaru’s involvement with dog causes, here.

(Woof in Advertising is a semi-regular feature on ohmidog! that looks at how dogs are used in marketing. You can find more posts here.)