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Tag: eats

Would you eat your dog to stay alive?

Marco Lavoie.jpg A hiker who was stranded in the Canadian wilderness for nearly three months after a bear destroyed his supplies had to eat his beloved dog to survive.  When Marco Lavoie was found by rescuers on Wednesday he was just days from death and had to be carried to a waiting helicopter.  The 44-year-old had been trapped with little food and survival equipment since July after a bear ransacked his campsite near the start of a planned three-month solo hike.Three days after his dog saved him from a bear in the Canadian wilderness, a stranded hiker ate his German shepherd to save himself from starvation.

Unable to find any food, Marco Lavoie, 44, killed his dog with a rock and ate him, according to the Canadian news agency QMI.

According to news reports, the first words the hiker uttered, after being found close to death by rescuers last week, were: “I want to get a new dog.”

Lavoie — after a bear destroyed his canoe and food supply — was stranded for three months in the wilderness about 500 miles outside Montreal. After the bear attack, he sprained his ankle and was unable to hunt or find any other source of food, according to reports.

Lavoie, an experienced hiker who often spent weeks in the wilderness by himself, was rescued by helicopter on Wednesday. He’d lost 90 pounds and was suffering from hypothermia. He was listed in critical condition in a hospital in Northern Quebec.

Survival expert Andre Francois Bourbeau told the Toronto Sun that Lavoie’s decision to eat his dog was a good one.

“He survived because he made good decisions. Eating his dog was one of them,” said Borbeau, the author of a survival guide. “You have to be desperate, but there’s no shame in (eating the dog),” said Bourbeau. “Hunger squeezes you so much that you would accept food that’s not normally possible,” said Bourbeau. “You can crave slugs and bugs.”

I’m sure there are many others who hold that view, and who’d point out that man – by virtue of that “dominion” he has over other animals, by virtue of being the superior, more developed being, by virtue of his position atop civilized society – has every right to chow down on his dog when trapped in the wilderness with no other options available.

But we don’t find much virtue at all in his actions.

We see more humanity in the dog, who loyally went along on his master’s silly wilderness trip, scared off a bear to protect him, and — despite any hunger pangs he might have been experiencing, despite his master’s hobbled condition – didn’t make a meal of Lavoie.

Dog seized after chewing up police car

patrolcar

 
Here’s an odd little story — and one that raises more questions than it answers –out of Chattanooga, where a dog apparently decided to eat a police car.

Police officer Clayton Holmes was sitting in his parked patrol car Sunday night — either to work on reports or to catch speeders on radar (the story seems to say both), when he suddenly felt his vehicle shaking.

He got out to investigate and found a bulldog had chewed two tires and the entire front bumper off the car.

(While cynics will wonder how the dog was able to consume so much of the police car so quickly, and speculate the officer was napping, we would never suggest such a thing.)

When another police car arrived, the dog attacked it, as well as two cars belonging to citizens who were driving by, police say.

Officers used pepper spray and a tazer on the dog, but neither seemed to faze it. Eventually McKamey Animal Center personnel responded to the scene and managed to capture the bulldog (how they did so isn’t described).

They also took into custody two other dogs that they say had managed to get through a fence of a nearby welding shop.

The owner of the dogs, Nancy Emerling, was issued a citation.

(Click  for an updated version of this story)

(Photo: Chattanooga Police Department)

Falsie alarm: The dog who felt like a boob

As yet more proof that dogs eat the strangest things, a terrier required veterinary treatment after wolfing down one of his owner’s silicone falsies.

The incident — despite its vast pun potential — was straightforwardly reported on Dogster back in August, in a dispatch written by the veterinarian, Dr. Eric Barchas.

“Last night at the emergency hospital a nurse carried a five-year-old Terrier cross into the treatment room. She advised me matter-of-factly that the dog had consumed a fake breast three hours earlier.”

Silicone_gel-filled_breast_implantsBarchas determined that the fake breast, while not toxic, would ultimately lodge in the dog’s intestines — the dog being only 15 pounds and the breast being a size B.

With only three hours having passed since ingestion, the vet decided to try to make the dog vomit. The clients authorized the procedure — and the vet forced the dog to vomit with an intravenous injection of a drug called apomorphine.

“The dog vomited copious dog food, a moderate amount of grass, several small twigs, an ear plug, some yarn, and a fake breast, size B,” Barchas wrote. Forty-five minutes later the dog was ready to go home. Barchas didn’t mention how much he billed the family, apparently heeding the Biblical advice:

“Beware of falsie profits.”

Dog eats rent … Then it gets even weirder

As further proof that for every strange dog behavior, there are human ones 100 times odder yet, comes this from Kenya:

A man in Kenya persuaded police to arrest his pet dog after the dog ate his rent money.

The dog’s owner says he left the money on his bed as he left for work. All that was left when he returned home later that day were a few shredded remnants of cash on the floor.

The man then took the dog to police and asked them to lock his pet up, according to Bartlesvillelive.com. They initially refused, but relented after the owner agreed to pay a “fee” to one of the officers.

That police officer was then fired for taking a bribe and the dog was returned to his owner.

The dog owner, still in need of rent money, has put the dog up for sale.

Dog ate the passport, student misses trip

A Wisconsin teenager’s excuse was true — his dog really did eat his passport — but, even so, he missed out on a class trip to Peru.

Jon Meier’s golden retriever, Sunshine, chewed the corner off his passport, obscuring some numbers, the Associated Press reported.

Officials at Chicago’s O’Hare airport told the 17-year-old not to worry, but authorities in Miami rejected the document, and refused to let him board. He couldn’t get another passport in time to join his Spanish class on the 12-day trip.

Meier, who attends Eau Claire North High School, said he held no grudge against his dog: “I love her too much,” he said.

Siberian “dog-girl” likely to go back home

Here’s a report from Russia Today on Natasha Mikhailova – the five-year-old Siberian girl who walks on all fours, and barks, meows and eats like the dogs and cats she was raised among.

Natasha, who is only the size of a two-year-old, was removed from the unheated three-room flat she lived in with her dad and grandparents after neighbors complained to authorities.

The girl’s mother, according to the report, says she was taken away by her husband two years ago and that she hadn’t seen her since.

The father was fined for neglect, according to the report, and the girl is expected to be sent back home.

“Kids, get the colander!”

Times are as hard for Kelley Davis as they are for everybody else, so when Augie, her family’s Swiss mountain dog gobbled up $400 in cash she was going to put in the bank — three $100′s and five $20′s — she started keeping a close eye on Augie’s doggie droppings.

The Apex, N.C. mother took the dog for a long walk on Saturday and that’s when Augie made a deposit that included her deposit. Or at least, once rinsed and pieced back together, $160 of it.

Davis, 42, a physical therapist, had left the money on her bedroom dresser, the Charlotte Observer reports. Augie, who is 2, helped himself.

When she saw pieces of the money in Augie’s droppings Saturday, Davis grabbed a garden hose and yelled, “Kids, get the colander!” she said.

By Monday night, Davis had the remnants of $160. She’s hoping to reclaim the full amount eventually.

The wrong way to pacify your pet

The Walsh family in Cape Town, South Africa, was wondering where all their pacifiers were going. Even with two young daughters, age 1 and 3, they couldn’t figure out how so many (13) disappeared so fast.

This week they found the culprit, their 6-month old Bull Terrier, Stella, who had swallowed each and every one.

That’s how many a shocked veterinarian discovered in the dog’s small intestine and stomach during an operation on Tuesday.

Stella’s veterinarian, Kati Plumstead, said Stella had been lethargic for a few months and couldn’t keep her food down. To finally find out was wrong, she X-rayed Stella’s torso and did not find anything unusual. But when she physically examined the dog, Plumstead felt something in Stella’s abdomen. With that, she did some exploratory surgery.

“I wasn’t quite sure what I was dealing with. I checked the rest of the abdomen and pulled out one dummy (that’s what they call them in South Africa). But then it was like dipping into a lucky packet. I pulled out another, then another and on it went,” she said.

On Wednesday, when Plumstead brought out the container of pacifiers to show the Cape Times newspaper, Stella immediately perked up and lunged towards them, nearly gobbling one again.

Her owner, Peter Walsh, said they had suspected the dog might have gotten a pacifier or two, judging from her droppings, but they had no idea a collection was forming inside her.

Stella is recovering at the vet and is expected to be discharged soon.