Give The Bark -- The Ultimate Dog Magazine

books on dogs

Introducing the New Havahart Wireless Custom-Shape Dog Fence

Find care for your pets at!
Pet Meds

Heartspeak message cards

Celebrate Mother's Day with $10 off! 130x600

Bulldog Leash Hook

Healthy Dog Treats

80% savings on Pet Medications

Free Shipping - Pet Medication

Cheapest Frontline Plus Online

Fine Leather Dog Collars For All Breeds

Tag: fall

Dog and boy pulled safely from 23-foot hole


A 4-year-old boy and his dog were rescued from a 23-foot hole in Mississippi Monday night, but any similarity between what happened outside Brookhaven and the old Lassie script end there.

In this story, it was the dog who first fell into the hole — initially described as a well. The boy, apparently while searching for the dog, fell in after him.

According to the Jackson Clarion Ledger, the boy’s dog had been missing for at least two days.

Family members believe the child, identified as Gabe Allbritton, was in the yard when he heard the dog, went to look for it and fell into the hole.

Members of the family say they had no idea the hole was even there.

Lincoln County Sheriff Steve Rushing said the hole’s opening was too small for rescue workers to go down, so they dropped the boy a rope. Initially, the boy could not figure out how to attach the rope to himself.

Emergency crews from McComb, Hattiesburg, the Mississippi State Fire Academy, the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, Brookhaven Fire Department, and every volunteer department in Lincoln County were on scene and a crowd of nearly 100 onlookers gathered.

Once rescue workers were able to instruct the boy how to attach the rope to himself he was raised with a pulley system. After being pulled out of the hole, around 8 p.m., he was taken to an emergency room and had no serious injuries.

The dog was freed shortly thereafter and returned safely to his family.

(Photo: Kaitlin Mullins / The Daily Leader)

Now that’s a dogcatcher: Man catches Bichon Frise that fell 14 stories

A Bichon Frise fell 14 floors from the balcony of a high-rise apartment in Portland, Oregon, and was caught by a man who was waiting with open arms.

Ted Nelson was in the right place at the right time — but only because he’d seen the little dog climb through the balcony railing from his own high rise apartment across the street.

nelsonNelson said he looked out his window Saturday morning, saw the dog climbing through the railing, ran out of his building and across the street and positioned himself underneath the balcony.

About then the dog lost his footing and plunged from the balcony.

“I just looked up at it and it was looking at me and it landed right in my chest,” Nelson told KGW.

Nelson admitted to fumbling the dog, which slipped out of his arms and fell to the ground, letting out a yelp.

Still, we’d put his catch right up there with anything you’ve seen in a Super Bowl.

Afterward, Nelson and his girlfriend took the five year old dog, named Mordy, to a vet, who pronounced him fine except for a couple of bruises.

Mordy’s owner told KGW off camera that he was thankful Nelson was there to catch his dog.

Dog found alive after her memorial service

graciejpeg-a13cc342cc44b832When a Labradoodle fell off the side of a 200-foot cliff in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge, members of the group she was hiking with all presumed she had died — and held a memorial service right there on the spot.

But Gracie, amazingly, was still alive.

And a rescue team hoisted her to safety.

The dog’s owner, Michelle Simmons, says her Labradoodle was part of a large hiking group. Gracie and another dog were playing on a trail when Gracie went over the side of the cliff.

Her horrified family held a memorial service for the pooch on the cliff.

Afterwards, another hiker heard the dog, contacted authorities, and the Oregon Humane Society sent a 10-person rescue team to the site, on Eagle Creek trail, near Punchbowl Falls.

Bruce Wyse, a member of the team, was lowered down the 200-foot cliff and fitted Gracie with a rescue harness. Team members then hoisted Gracie and Wyse back up the cliff.

She was in fairly good shape, having suffered only bruises and scratches, the Oregonian reported.

The rescue team’s leader., Rene Pizzo, said the incident should be a reminder to other pet owners who hike with their animals to keep their dogs on leashes.

“We strongly urge dog owners to keep their pets on leash all the time in areas such as the Columbia Gorge,” Pizzo said. “Your dog’s leash can save your pet’s life.”

(Photo: Oregon Humane Society)

How many dogs can a dog walker walk?


How many dogs should a dog walker walk at once?

After half a century as an amateur dog walker, and three months as a professional one, I’m prepared to give a qualified answer to that question.

It depends on the dogs. It depends on the dog walker. But three at a time should be plenty.

Many a dog walker might scoff at that — and view the idea of limiting the number of dogs a person can walk at one time as cutting into their profit margin.

It would be nice if dog walking was the one industry in the world not obsessed with upping its profits. But it’s not.

Many dog walkers balked when San Francisco — one of very few cities that regulates professional dog walkers — suggested limiting them to walking no more than eight dogs at once.

I can’t imagine doing that.

I can’t even imagine walking all three of the small dogs I walk for residents of at an assisted living facility all at once.

bgdogs 042Their leashes would get tangled, I’d trip and fall, and, given a couple of them tend to snarf up anything that resembles food — including Punkin, the handsome Boston Terrier to your left – I wouldn’t be able to monitor all three at once.

So — even though it takes three times as long — I opt for walking them one at a time. Bean counters and efficiency experts would say that’s stupid of me.

But then again, I’m 60, and not as agile and speedy, maybe, as once I was.

Here’s a news item that came out of Mill Valley, just up the road from San Francisco, this week:

A 71-year-old dog walker who fell more than 200 feet down a ravine in California was found by rescuers — with all six dogs she was walking huddled around her.

Carol Anderson fell into the ravine near a remote fire road during a storm Tuesday in Mill Valley, KTVU reported.

It’s not clear from news reports whether all six dogs fell with her, but she did manage to hold on to her cell phone during the tumble, and use it to contact one of her dog walking clients.

A Mill Valley Fire Department official said Anderson told the client, “I fell down, I don’t know where I’m at. I have the dogs. I’m dizzy. I’m nauseous, come help me.”

Authorities were able to track her down through her cell phone signals. The first rescuers to arrive found all six dogs curled up around her, which authorities said probably protected her from the cold. Firefighters climbed into the ravine and hoisted Anderson back up.

Anderson was hospitalized in fair condition. All the dogs were returned safely to their owners

It wasn’t the first time the dog walker has run into some bad luck.

In 2007, three of seven dogs Anderson had been walking — all at once — all got sick and died, just hours later, from what turned out to be strychnine poisoning intended to exterminate gophers.

After a morning walk on the Alta Trail above Marin City, the three dogs experienced high fevers and seizures. Two died at an area pet hospital, and a third was dead on arrival.

Walking six, seven, eight or more dogs at once strikes me as asking for trouble — no matter how well behaved the dogs are, or how experienced and physically fit the dog walker is.

I don’t think the rest of the country needs to go all San Francisco and regulate the industry. Dog owners can do that themselves, simply by asking, or insisting if necessary, that their dog not be walked in a group the size of a baseball team, or jury.

The dog walker who refuses to comply with such a request is probably more of a money seeker than a dog lover and may be better off avoided anyway.

(Top photo, a dog walker in San Francisco, by Mike Koozmin/ San Francisco Examiner; bottom photo by John Woestendiek / ohmidog!)

Cecil Williams will keep his guide dog; help pours in after they’re hit by subway train

Visit for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

A blind man and his guide dog who were struck by a subway train in Manhattan Tuesday will be able to remain together — thanks to donations from members of the public touched by their story.

Cecil Williams fainted and fell on the New York City subway tracks, taking his harnessed dog, Orlando, with him.

Orlando barked for help and stayed by his side, even as the train passed over them.

In a story about the accident that aired on NBC Nightly News Tuesday night, it was reported that Orlando was slated to retire in January, and that Williams lacked the funds to continue to care for the dog afterwards, when the dog would no longer be covered by his insurance.

Since then, enough donations to their cause have been received by Guiding Eyes for the Blind to help pay for all of Orlando’s retirement expenses, and ensure that the pair’s eight-year relationship continues.

williamsand orlandoWilliams, 61, was on his way to the dentist when he fainted at the 125th Street platform. Witnesses said the dog was barking and tried to stop Williams from falling, as he is trained to do. When they both landed on the tracks, Orlando tried to rouse Williams, who was unconscious. Both lay there as a slow-moving subway train passed above them.

Nieither sustained serious injuries.

“The dog saved my life,” Williams said of his Labrador retriever. “I’m feeling amazed. I feel that God, the powers that be, have something in store from me. They didn’t take me away this time. I’m here for a reason.”

Williams, who is on insulin and other medications, was taken to a hospital, where Orlando remains at his bedside.

The Brooklyn man has been blind since 1995. Orlando, his second guide dog, “saves my life on a daily basis,” he said.

At a press conference Williams thanked everyone “for showing their humanity and peace and goodwill” by making donations to the guide dog school that trained Orlando.

“All the people who contribute and donated I think we should take our hat off to them,” he said. “There’s still good people in this world.”

(Photo: Williams and Orlando at press conference; by Carlo Allegri / REUTERS, via NBC)

Cat falls from 43rd floor balcony to its death; three days later, dog does the same


It shouldn’t take a whole lot of common sense to realize high-rise living can be perilous for pets, but this story out of Chicago serves as a vivid and tragic reminder.

A dog named Duke fell to his death from a 43rd floor balcony Wednesday morning — just three days after a cat, spooked by the dog, fell from the same balcony.

As reported by the Chicago Sun-Times, the two cats lived in the 43rd floor unit with a man identified only as Ryan, and they commonly hung out on the balcony.

“I’d convinced myself thoroughly that there’s no way these cats would even slip off because they had that instinctual fear that right over this edge is a big drop,” Ryan said.

But during a visit from his parents, and their dog, Duke, one of the cats got startled when he saw the dog through the glass door, lost his balance and fell to his death.

Three days later, Ryan and his visiting family members had left the apartment, leaving the dog inside and, apparently, leaving the sliding glass door open.

Ryan, a 26-year-old musician who manages a video production company, said he was preparing to move, and had left a few boxes and chairs on the balcony.

“It created a ladder that no one was thinking of,” he said.

He, his mother, stepfather and sister went out to get breakfast and run errands. When they returned, Duke, a medium sized mixed breed dog,  wasn’t there.

Ryan and his stepfather went to the balcony and peeked over the edge and saw police cars pulling up to the front of the building.

“He was in shock,” Ryan said of his stepfather, “and he was like, ‘Where’s the dog?’ and since this had just happened to the cat . . . I already figured the worst.”

Police are investigating the dog’s death, but are preliminarily classifying it an accident.

Portraits of Ace, in yellow

Before leaving Montana, I had to capture Ace amid all the yellow leaves that, on the trees and on the ground, were giving Missoula one last blast of vibrant color before winter sets in.

I’ve always thought he was an Autumn dog, the way his coat contains many of the season’s hues. Yellow, I think, looks pretty good on him. And vice versa.

Mission accomplished, we’ve moved on — headed for Idaho, Washington and then points south.