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Tag: fleeing

Family dog tackles suspect fleeing police

As many times as we’ve reported on police, while responding to a call, shooting and killing a homeowner’s dog, it’s only right to share this story with you — and perhaps remind police that not every dog is their enemy.

This one, named Georgio, turned out to be an ally.

When two suspects trying to outrun Volusia Count sheriff’s deputies cut through a backyard, Georgio leaped up, chased them, and brought one down.

The homeowner, Mario Figueroa, said he was lighting his fire pit when the two men came running through his yard.

“I was standing right there and didn’t even see the gentlemen coming in from behind me,” he told News 6.

The tackle was captured on video from a Volusia County sheriff’s helicopter.

Deputies on foot caught up with and arrested two men, identified as Corey Williams and Deonte Broady.

The two-year-old rescue dog was tethered with a long leash when he brought down the suspect.

“The guys were on his territory and he took them down,” Figueroa said.

Deputies said the men were driving with a stolen tag. After the pursuit began, they ditched the car and were trying to escape on foot.

That’s when they made the mistake of entering Georgio’s yard.

“Yeah, he took him down like a professional police dog,” Figueroa said. “He’s pretty awesome. Georgio just took care of me. He’s a wonderful dog.”

Who needs Disney World when 900 dogs are staying at your hotel?

irma3

If you passed through the lobby of Orlando’s Hyatt Regency a week ago, you might have thought the Westminster Dog Show had a new home.

The hotel estimates it had between 800 and 900 canine guests over the weekend — the vast majority of them belonging to families that were fleeing Hurricane Irma.

irmaAs the hurricane struck Florida’s southern tip, and then its western shores, many residents headed north or east to Orlando for safety and sought refuge in the dog-friendly hotel.
The hotel wasn’t doing anything as noble as offering free shelter, though.

To say it “opened its heart” to evacuees and their dogs — as some reports have put it — is a bit of a leap.

But it did offer paying guests with dogs a break on its normal $150 cleaning fee, dropping it to (an almost reasonable) $50.

irma2Judging from photos of guests and their dogs that were posted on Instagram, the hotel maybe also have relaxed its 50-pound weight limit.

Most of the dogs belonged to families fleeing the hurricane, the Orlando Sentinel reported. But others belonged to families on vacation who either planned to bring their dogs along or brought them along at the last minute, not wanting to leave them behind in kennels when a hurricane was approaching.

The hotel also designated a few areas closer to the hotel entrance where dogs could relieve themselves that were partially sheltered from the wind and rain.

(Photos: Instagram)

Law would require reporting pets hit on road

A California lawmaker has proposed making it illegal to flee the scene of an accident in which a dog, cat or farm animal has been injured.

The measure, sponsored by Assemblyman Mike Eng, would require that drivers attempt to provide aid to an injured farm animal or pet, and notify the owner or animal-control authorities. Violators would face fines and possible jail time.

Eng said he wrote the bill after hearing from a constituent who lost a family dog.

While it is a misdemeanor to flee an accident involving property loss — after crushing a mailbox, for example — there is no law against a hit-and-run involving a pet, Eng said.

“You can wantonly hit an animal and leave and face no consequences,” Eng said. “An inanimate object has more rights.”

“In theory, it makes a lot of sense to let people know they have an obligation when they hit an animal,” Jon Cicirelli of the California Animal Control Directors Association, told the Los Angeles Times. “But in practice it can be pretty problematic.” Injured animals might turn on people trying to help, he pointed out.

New York, Germany and Singapore have similar laws, according to the Times article.