Tag Archives: food

Mississippi State football player charged with starving Great Dane

storyA member of the Mississippi State football team has been suspended after his arrest on animal cruelty charges related to allegations he left a Great Dane locked in a room without food or water for at least three days.

Head Coach Joe Moorhead devoted a full 30 seconds to the incident in an 11-minute press conference Wednesday, stating little more than that offensive lineman Michael Story was indefinitely suspended as soon as the team learned about the charges.

Police in Starkville apparently did not reveal much about the incident either.

Both the name of the complainant and the address of the home where the incident occurred were redacted in the police complaint, which made no mention of any reasons Story might have had for sequestering the dog.

Story was charged Saturday on a misdemeanor count of aggravated cruelty to a cat or dog, WTVA reported.

The complainant told police that Story “shut Kodak the Great Dane in the back room of his apartment and did not feed or water Kodak the Great Dane since Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, until Aug. 18, 2018. Mr. Story then stated at a later time that Kodak the Great Dane had been in the bedroom of the apartment for roughly a week’s time.”

At a press conference on the final day of training, Coach Moorhead answered questions about training and the outlook for the team before a reporter asked, “What is Michael Story’s status with the team?”

“I’d rather just meet this out in front of it,” the coach answered, but his subsequent remarks shed little light on what happened.

He confirmed that Story had been suspended indefinitely as soon as the charges became known.

“We talk to our team all the time about our decision-making and our conduct off the field, and that’s something we certainly stress everyday. The discipline of this will be handled accordingly,” he said.

He added no more, and the next question was, “What’s the rotation at cornerback?”

You can watch the full press conference here.

Story, a junior from Ripley, was practicing as a second-team left guard early in preseason camp. He started twice as a freshman in 2016 but hasn’t started since.

(Associated Press photo by Michael Woods)

Thief snatches trailer New Mexico rescue group used for adoption events

The theft of a trailer loaded with pet supplies Saturday means some dogs will wait a little longer for homes, and that an Albuquerque rescue group called the People’s Anti-Cruelty Association is going to have to rebuild.

The trailer was parked at a street corner where the nonprofit volunteer group holds adoption events every Saturday.

Sometime during the night, thieves hauled it away, along with the paperwork, leashes, pet food and other supplies inside, KOB in Albuquerque reported.

“When they stole our trailer it has greatly, greatly hindered our ability to (help animals) because if we can’t find it and its contents, we’re going to have to start all over,” said Arnielle Fernandez, a volunteer with PACA. “And that is very pricey.”

“Everything that was in the trailer was like crates that we set up for our dogs, our collars, our leashes, some dog food. Puppy pens, blankets, you know, towels – everything we need to function,” Fernandez said. “Ordinarily we, throughout the years, we have found permanent loving homes for thousands of dogs and cats.”

The group is now asking the public to keep an eye out for the trailer, which is white and has paw print decals, along with the PACA logo.

“Ask them to bring it back. That would be wonderful. It would be like Christmas in May,” Fernandez said.

While the group works to plan another event this weekend, Fernandez said it will be more difficult to pull off.

“Anybody that is in such a horrible state, on a personal level, that would do something like that to a non-profit rescue organization – they’re of very, very little character,” she said.

Amazon introduces its own dog food line

wagfoodAmazon (remember when it was a river?) continues its quest to dominate the world (make that the universe) — by selling everything that can possibly be sold, delivering it in ways never before possible, and taking people where they’ve never been able to go.

Now it wants to feed your dog, too.

In its march to ruling every retail category imaginable, Amazon has announced the debut of a dog food line, which will be part of a much bigger step into the highly profitable, nearly inflation-proof world of pet food and products.

According to Bloomberg, Amazon is calling the pet food Wag, named after Wag.com, which Amazon acquired in 2011. Wag.com now redirects to an Amazon landing page.

The food comes in several different varieties, with primarily protein sources including chicken, beef, salmon, lamb, and turkey. It will be available in puppy or adult formula and sold in five-, 15-, and 30-pound bags.

The food line is labeled “no grain added.”

Americans are projected to spend more than $72 billion on their pets in 2018, according to the American Pet Products Association. So the only real surprise here is, what took Amazon, which owns everything from Whole Foods to the Washington Post, which is renowned as a dog-friendly company, so long?

The move is seen as a threat to Petco Animal Supplies Inc. and PetSmart Inc., which purchased Chewy.com last year for more than $3 billion, as well as big box retailers and supermarkets that sell pet supplies online to many of the nation’s 85 million pet-owning households.

So don’t be surprised if you are seeing dog food-toting drones flying over head in your area some day soon.

Another example of how humans and dogs are becoming more alike: our poop


It’s never really looked at it in its entirety, as one phenomenon, but how alike dogs and humans are — and keep becoming — continues to astound scientists around the globe.

Compassion? Both species seem to have it. Cognition? Dogs are quite capable of that, perhaps even exceeding us in certain areas. The diseases and disorders we get? Pretty much the same.

Not too many people look at the forest — at what all this, cobbled together, might mean — but scientists from particular disciplines, locked in a lab with a narrow focus, keep discovering new similarities, such as this latest one, deep in our intestines.

The microorganisms that live in dog’s intestines are more similar to the microbes inside us than to those in other animals, says a new study published in the journal Microbiome.

The dog microbiome “has some of the same species [of bacteria] as the human’s,” said lead author Luis Pedro Coelhos, “but different strains.”

The researchers were surprised because they expected that dogs would share only a few strains of bacteria with their owners. Instead, their intestinal flora could be cousins, says a summary of the study in Popular Science.

The study was not really about those similarities; it was aimed at better understanding canine weight loss.

Researchers at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and Nestlé Purina Research worked with a sample of 32 beagles and 32 Labrador retrievers. Half of the members of each breed were overweight, while the other half were a healthy weight. For four weeks, they fed all of the dogs the same diet of Purina.

Then, they collected poop and conducted DNA analyses as they further altered the diets of the dogs.

They found the leaner dogs’ microbiomes changed much less than that of the overweight dogs. The findings, they say, gave then a baseline for how a healthy dog microbiome should behave, and suggested dogs may be better subjects for research into human weight loss than other species that have been used for that purpose.

Jack Gilbert, a researcher at the University of Chicago’s Microbiome Center who does research for Purina but was not involved in the study, told Popular Science the study was significant for what it showed about the similarities between the guts of dogs and our own.

“You can control a dog’s diet much more than you can do a human’s,” says Gilbert. The same is true for pigs and mice, but the fact that dogs have such a similar microbiomes to humans means that studying their response to certain diets could produce the best results.

The cause of the similarities isn’t entirely understood, but the study pointed out, “Dogs were domesticated early in modern human history and frequently shared food resources with humans.”

Over time, their digestive systems might have grown even more like our’s, and their obesity rates have come to mirror that of humans.

Further proof that we don’t just like each other, we are like each other — and in ways that continue to be discovered, as we sit around learning, bonding, loving, overeating and growing fat together, becoming, more and more, reflections of each other.

(Photo: Digital Vision/Getty)

Smucker Co. buys Rachel Ray dog foods

nutrish

The nation’s most beloved maker of jams and jellies is buying up the pet food company that carries the name of the nation’s most beloved TV cook.

J.M. Smucker Co. has agreed to pay $1.9 billion to buy Ainsworth Pet Nutrition, which makes primarily the Rachel Ray brand dog Nutrish.

The acquisition is the latest pet food line taken over by Smucker, which also owns Kibbles n’ Bits, Meow Mix, Gravy Train, Skippy and Ol’ Roy brands.

By putting more emphasis on pet food — specifically so-called “premium” pet foods — the company hope to invigorate sales, which have been sluggish for consumer goods aimed at humans.

The purchase comes on the heels of recent recalls for some of Smucker’s canned dog food brands — Gravy Train, Skippy, Ol’ Roy and Kibbles ‘N Bits.

Traces of the euthanasia drug pentobarbital found in some cans led to the recall.

smuckersSmucker first got into the pet business in 2015 with a $5.8 billion acquisition of Big Heart Pet Brands, according to Bloomberg. The company, best known for its namesake jam, also produces Folgers coffee and Jif peanut butter.

With the purchase of Nutrish, pet foods will become Smucker’s larges source of sales.

The company is also looking at selling off some of its human food products, including the Pillsbury line of baked goods.

It is focusing more on premium pet foods. High-end pet food has surged 33 percent industrywide over the past five years and now accounts for more than 50 percent of the market.

Smucker generates about 85 percent of its revenue in the U.S. and the acquisition of Ainsworth will make pet food its largest business unit, accounting for about $3 billion in sales.

Smucker is the latest food company to tap into the upscale pet market. General Mills Inc., mired in a three-year sales slump, agreed in February to buy Blue Buffalo Pet Products Inc. for about $8 billion.

Tiny Texas town’s barbecue eating dog, Jake, passes away on Easter

The Circle H Bar-B-Q & Grill in the tiny east Texas town of Emory has lost its best non-paying customer.

Like clockwork, an elderly yellow Lab named Jake would show up daily at the restaurant’s drive-thru window, take a seat and patiently wait for handouts.

Why? Because it was convenient for one thing. Jake lived at an auto repair shop right next door. Plus, he just flat out loved barbecue.

jake“Everybody else does too, he just gets his for free,” said Tyson Thompson, a waiter at Circle H.

“Everybody knows Jake,” said Josh Hines, the man who provided Jake with all his favorite food at the drive-thru. “He’s definitely the town mascot.”

He may have gotten all sorts of treats from customers, but Hines knew to provide him only with rib bones,according to EastTexasMatters.com.

“He loves the rib bones … I think that’s all he’s allowed to have cause all of the other stuff is bad for him,” said Thompson.

Jake would station himself just underneath the drive thru window and take a seat. When a customer pulled up, he would limp out of the way, resuming his position as soon as the car pulled out.

Jake’s owners operate Parmer’s Automotive, where he serves as shop mascot too.

jake2“Everyone loves Jake. In the parking lots, they’ll come up and pet him, they’ll just talk to him and give him treats. One person even bought him a whole sandwich,” said Keldon Parmer, the son of the auto shop’s operator.

After downing some barbecue, Jake would traipse back to the auto shop and wash it down with some toilet water before climbing into the back of a truck bed for his nap.

The Parmers say Jake died on Easter, at age 13. He’d been diagnosed with cancer in January. Surgery was performed, KXAN reported, but he was diagnosed with only months to live.

Dog food recall is tenth in less than a month

steve's dog food

If it seems like there’s a new pet food or treat being recalled every week recently, that’s because it has gotten that bad.

Worse even.

We count ten since Feb. 8 — most of those of food and treats suspected of possibly being contaminated with salmonella.

The recalled products include dry food, canned food and raw food, treats and bully sticks.

gravytrainProbably most notable of those recalled are the Gravy Train, Kibbles ‘N Bits, Skippy and Ol’ Roy brands of canned dog food made by the J.M. Smucker company. Pentobarbital, the sedative used to put dogs down, has been found in cans dating back to 2016.

Smucker released a statement on its website, confirming “extremely low levels of pentobarbital” have been found in “in select shipments.”

On Sunday, it told the Miami Herald that the source of the drug was “animal fat was sourced from cow, chicken, and pig.”

While those are common sources of pet food, animals euthanized with the drug are not supposed to end up in the food chain — for either dogs or humans.

Last week also saw the recall of an eighth pet food product suspected of containing salmonella or listeria in 24 days, Steve’s Real Food’s Raw Frozen Dog Food Turkey Canine Recipe, recalled one lot that was distributed to 21 states.

The Nebraska Department of Agriculture found salmonella when testing a retail sold sample.

The 5-pound bags in lot No. E 178 with a best by date of Sept. 17, 2018 went to retail stores in Florida, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, California, Texas, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Nebraska, Oregon, Utah and Washington, according to the Miami Herald.

Dogs with salmonella can suffer from vomiting, diarrhea and fever.

Humans also can get salmonella, both from dogs and from handling contaminated food or touching unwashed surfaces that the food touched.

Those who have purchased the products should dispose of them and contact the company for a refund.

Other recalls and product withdrawals in the past month include:

▪ Raws for Paws ground turkey

▪ Smokehouse Beefy Munchies treats

▪ Arrow Reliance/Darwin’s Natural ZooLogics Duck with Vegetable Meals for Dogs and ZooLogics Chicken with Vegetable Meals for Dogs

▪ Redbarn, 7-inch Bully Sticks

▪ TruPet, Treat Me Crunchy Beef Delight treats

▪ Northwest Naturals, Chicken and Salmon

▪ Carnivore Meat Company, Vital Essentials Freeze-Dried Beef Nibblets Entrée for Dogs

▪ Kitten Grind raw pet food