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Tag: fostering

U of Houston president adopts campus stray

The popular president of the University of Houston became a little more popular this week with her announcement that a stray dog who had been wandering around campus had been adopted.

By her.

President Renu Khator announced on Twitter Tuesday, “To all those concerned about the stray dog on campus for a week, don’t worry. I have brought her home from BARC to foster and adopt. Her name is Ruby!” Khator wrote.

BARC is the City of Houston’s Animal Shelter and Adoption Facility and is responsible for animal control in the city.

The stray had become something of a celebrity in the week she spent wandering the campus, and some students referred to her as “Professor.”

Apparently, after the dog was taken in by BARC, Khator made arrangements to foster and eventally adopt the dog.

Khator’s followers flooded her Twitter thread, sharing their own photos, praising her generosity and calling her the ‘best president’ a university could have, the Houston Chronicle reported.

“Just another reason to love our prez,” wrote one student.

By Wednesday morning, the dog appeared to be fitting easily into her new role as an unofficial UH mascot. Khator shared photos of her sporting a Cougar-red collar embroidered with a UH logo, as they walked together.

When one foster dog becomes 19 foster dogs — overnight

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A Missouri woman trying to save one dog’s life has saved 18 more — all born Sunday when the golden retriever-Chow mix she was fostering gave birth.

Ashlee Holland took the dog into her home as a foster through the rescue group Midwest Animal ResQ, which pulled her from an area shelter as the deadline neared for her to be euthanized.

And while Holland knew the dog, named Ava, was pregnant, she wasn’t expecting the outpouring of pups that took place, starting Sunday night and not ending until Monday morning.

“It’s overwhelming. It’s incredible. I didn’t just save one life, I saved 19. It’s amazing,” Holland told Fox 4 News in Kansas City.

Holland started fostering Ava about two weeks ago.

She said her nine-year-old son named all the pups after Kansas City Royals players.

Ava and her pups will be available for adoption through Midwest Animal ResQ.

Holland has created an Ava and her 18 Royals Facebook page for those interested in following Ava and her pups.

(Photo: Ava gets a much needed break from her 18 pups, from Facebook)

Lollie Wonderdog finds her family

Lollie Wonderdog, the pit bull mix reclaimed from a Maryland trash bin and lovingly fostered for nearly five months in a Takoma Park home, has been adopted.

Lollie, whose experience as a foster dog was recounted in the blog Love and a Six-Foot Leash, was adopted by a family of four — a family (that’s part of it to the left) whose mom saw in Lollie a fellow survivor.

It’s a lovely ending to a tale well told by Aleksandra Gajdeczka, whose family took Lollie in temporarily and blogged about the experience — partly in an attempt to find a permanent home for the three-year-old dog, partly to tell the world about the joys of fostering.

Including, last week, the bittersweet and often tearful feeling that accompanies the successful conclusion of that experience.

In a letter to her departed foster dog, she wrote, “You pass through the world with a carefree grace that I have rarely seen in a dog, and have never seen in a person. Your ability to make everybody like you and the whole world smile, paired with your ability to overcome anything with a wagging tail and a flapping tongue is truly remarkable. I hope you don’t remember the specifics of how you ended up in that dumpster in September, bruised, half-starved, and filthy, but I hope you always remember that you have overcome so much — and come out a shooting star. An eternal firework.

“Lollie Wonderdog, it’s an amazing thing when a sad little dog can teach a bunch of humans so much about perseverance, patience, and overcoming the odds. You have touched our lives forever, and we love you very much.”

Emotions ran strong on the receiving end, too. After Lollie — whose new name is Lily Fireworks — was situated in her new home, her new owner wrote down her thoughts about it all, which were published on Love and a Leash this week:

“I had breast cancer at 24, had a few breast surgeries, lost all my hair, all that fun stuff … Fast forward six years, and we’re looking for a dog. We found Daisy, a beagle with giant “udders.” A breast cancer survivor finds a dog with udders…it was meant to be! Last year I went through chemo again when my cancer returned, and Daisy beagle was the sole reason I got up and got any exercise some days. She lay next to me on the couch when I felt pukey, she sniffed my head when my hair fell out again, she saw me through the whole year of chemo. That’s a lot of walks together … Sadly, we lost Daisy very unexpectedly a few months ago, and I didn’t want another dog …”

Then she came across Lollie’s blog, through the Montgomery County Humane Society website.

“We contacted Aleksandra and set up a time for John and me to meet her Lollie Wonderdog. If we thought she’d be a good family member, then we’d tell the little ones. We went to meet Lollie. I couldn’t get over her itty bitty waist. She was adorable. Those giant eyes … she licked my stinky shoelaces, and it was love. How could a dog who had been through so much still have so much love to give? I thought about it — Lollie and I are both survivors …”

(Photo by Aleksandra Gajdeczka, courtesy of Love and a Leash)

Fanny comes, Fanny goes

My brief experience fostering a dog over the weekend — a lively and lovable pup named Fanny — renewed my admiration for those who do it regularly, my own fading memories of puppyhood, and my appreciation for my dog Ace, who was, for the most part, both dependable role model and patient host.

Fanny, who was pulled out of BARCS by the new local rescue group Stop Killing Dogs, is back at the Downtown Dog Resort & Spa, out of which the group works, and available for adoption.

My best guess is she’s part chocolate Lab, part German shepherd, with a small sprinkling of pit bull. Eight months old, she’s sweet, smart, recently spayed, with a lush silvery-brown, short-haired coat. She’ll probably grow into a good-sized dog, and, with proper upbringing, a well-behaved one.

She’s sociable, but sometimes snarly with other dogs. A couple of times she growled and jumped on Ace, but he quickly put Fanny in her place. By weekend’s end, she seemed enamored with him, following him like a shadow, which Ace tolerated.

Ace, who is four, also came from BARCS (Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter). Fanny’s let’s play, let’s play, Energizer bunny enthusiasm brought back memories of his puppyhood — at least to me, if not him.

Fanny’s previous name was Wonder Woman, and she ended up in shelter when her owner could no longer care for her.

Sunday afternoon, we returned her to Downtown Dog Resort & Spa and said our goodbyes. The new kennel and veterinary center was built by Baltimore attorney Barry Glazer, who is also involved in the rescue group. His hope, according to its website, is to rescue dogs and make a profit at the same time. In addition to seeking new permanent homes for homeless dogs, the rescue is seeking volunteers to serve as foster parents.

It’s a good way to liven up a weekend, or more, and the hardest part, most foster parents will tell you, is saying goodbye at the end — breaking the bond you just made.

While the time’s not right for me to have another dog, there were times it entered my mind — such as when both of us were on the couch, and she, her head on my belly, gazed into my eyes for about 60 seconds.

Twice, I had to ask her to stop doing that.

If you’re interested in adopting Fanny/Wonder Woman — the rescue charges a $200 adoption fee — send an email to  sallyannjennings@gmail.com, or stopkillingdogs@gmail.com.