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Tag: fractured

Ruby reassembled

Ruby the lurcher

A team of 40 vets and nurses, working around the clock for over two months, helped reassemble a three-year-old dog named Ruby after she was hit by a car.

After  a series of operations at a cost of £11,500, Ruby, who remained cheerful and upbeat throughout the ordeal, is recovering, according to the Daily Mail.

Ruby suffered fractures to her two front legs, sternum and toe, a dislocated knee, ruptured ligaments and internal bleeding when she was struck by the car on January 26.

Because she did not have any head injuries, the vets said if she could live through the next 24 hours she had a good chance.

“Her legs will take about five months to heal totally but in herself she is happy, sweet-natured and an inspiration to the rest of us,” said her owner, Vanessa Gillespie. “The vet said he had never seen a dog so broken still so happy. Most dogs would not have survived but Ruby is a toughie.’

Ruby was run over in the village of Cambourne in Cambridgeshire.

Rubys Injuries.jpg

She spent five weeks at Queen’s Veterinary School Hospital in Cambridge, and had two major operations — first a nine-hour procedure in which her broken legs were repaired using four metal plates and screws, then a seven-hour operation to replace the ruptured knee ligaments, carry out skin grafts and amputate the broken toe. The fractured breastbone and internal bleeding were left to heal naturally.

Gillespie said most of the bill was covered by insurance. “If she had not been insured we would have had to put her down,” she said.

Survivor: One-eyed dog keeps looking forward

kennedyIn December 2008, Robert Kennedy spotted a blue towel in the weeds of  Murphey Candler Park in DeKalb County, outside of Atlanta.

Upon closer inspection, he found a dog underneath it, one whose head had been badly beaten. An investigation would later determine the dog, named Austin at the time, had been bashed in the head twice with a sledgehammer. His owner, Joe Waters would later be arrested.

The case led to international headlines, and an outpouring of support.

Today, Murphy, as he was renamed — after the park — belongs officially to Kennedy. The 9-year-old Australian shepherd mix has only one eye, and a dented head, but he’s managed to teach Kennedy volumes.

As the Atlanta Journal-Constitution put it, “Murphy is far more focused on what lies ahead, not what is behind him.”

“I hope if I ever have any challenges, I can recover like him,” Kennedy said. “I take my cues from Murphy, and he has forgotten all about it.”

Kennedy, who found Murphy on his 60th birthday, took him to the closest veterinarian he could find. Stephen Pope, the medical director at VCA Pets Are People Too in Dunwoody, performed surgery to repair the skull and jaw fractures and to remove the damaged left eye. Eight days and $10,000 worth of care later, Murphy was released into Kennedy’s custody.

The dog suffered no long-term neurological damage and behaves much like any other dog, compensating only with the occasional cocked head to use his good eye. Under Kennedy’s care, Murphy’s weight has gone from 38 to 53 pounds.

Kennedy set up a trust fund for the dog’s care after offers to help poured in from 30 states, Puerto Rico and Canada. He raised $38,000 — money that will last throughout Murphy’s life and then go to nonprofit pet rescue groups.

The dog’s previous owner was convicted of a felony and two misdemeanors. He says he thought his pet had been poisoned and was attempting to mercifully kill it. He was sentenced to one year in jail.

Immediately after the ruling, a prosecutor presented Kennedy with notarized papers, declaring Murphy was his.

“He couldn’t be happier with life,” Kennedy said. “My wish for everybody is to have room in their heart to take a dog into their home and know that kind of happiness.”

(Photo: Vino Wong /Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Helping man’s best phriend in Philly

MickeyWhen a stray 20-pound Australian cattle dog was struck by a car while crossing Washington Street in South Philadelphia back in March, three police officers rushed her to the Pennsylvania SPCA.

On Sunday, the dog, now known as Miss Mickey, and her foster parent, from the Australian Cattle Dog Rescue Association, dropped by the Third District Police Station at 11th and Wharton Streets with a $150 donation to the city’s Fallen Officers Fund, presented on the dog’s behalf.

Officers Brian Karpinski, Jason Rush and Melissa Kromchad accepted the gift, with appreciative pats for Miss Mickey, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

“Last time I saw her,” Rush said, “she didn’t look anything like that.”

When Miss Mickey was hit, the officers put her in a patrol wagon and sped to the SPCA, where veterinarians found her pelvis had been crushed.

After a week of treatment there, Miss Mickey, thought to be about 6 years old, was tranferred to Valley Central Veterinary Referral Center in the Lehigh Valley, where metal plates were implanted in her pelvis. The surgeon discounted his bill, from the normal $10,000 to $1,800.

South Street merchant Tony Fisher, who witnessed the accident, started soliciting donations from his customers via email. It was Fisher, who runs Big Green Earth, who came up with the dog’s new name.

Fisher and Marianne Ahern, who volunteered to foster Miss Mickey, also used Facebook to get the word out about her condition. One of Fisher’s customers even sold some of his original artwork on eBay to raise money, and donations came from as far away as Florida and California.

The campaign brought in $4,000. After paying the dog’s medical expenses, the remainder was donated to the Fallen Officers Fund.

Ahern said Miss Mickey is fully recovered from her injuries – and up for adoption. If interested, visit the website of the Australian Cattle Dog Rescue Association.