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Tag: funds

Sailor finds some friends in South Philly

Neighbors in South Philadelphia found a bruised, battered and hungry dog, took him in, and have raised enough money for him to have surgery tomorrow.

Apparently, the 6-month-old shepherd mix, who they’ve named Sailor — given he was a bit of a shipwreck when they found him at 15th and Federal Streets in South Philadelphia — had been abandoned, and hit by a car. Three of his legs were injured and he was barely able to walk, CBS in Philadelphia reported.

When his rescuers brought him home, Sailor was so emaciated some weren’t sure he would make it, but he has gained 10 pounds since then, and he’s scheduled for surgery this week, at a cost of about $5,000.

“A lot of vets told me to put him down right away,” said Clair Sauer. “The surgeons were ready to operate on him yesterday, but I had to tell them ‘I don’t have the money.’” Sailor’s foster family set up a Sailor website to help raise the money. In little more than 24 hours, they reached their goal.

According to the website, the surgery will be performed at CARES in Langhorne, Pa., by Dr. Brentz. Sailor will have his rear femur cut and “put back into place with lots of metal…”

“Recovery will be long and will take patience, but we will be there for him! He will need lots more x-rays to monitor how his bones are healing. And, when he is ready, physical therapy. These will incur more costs, but we will stay optimistic!”

Once Sailor recovers from his surgery, he will be put up for adoption.

New dog park planned in Salisbury

Construction will begin this summer in Salisbury, Maryland on a new dog park, expected to be named after a local dog lover whose family has donated most of the money to build it.

The park will be built on an undeveloped portion of the City Park off North Park Drive, behind the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center’s parking lot.

The project is expected to cost about $30,000, DelmarvaNow.com reported.

The park will have 14,000 square feet of open space for large dogs and a separate section of 8,000 square feet for small dogs.

Plans call for the fenced-in park to be named in honor of Martha Frances “Francie” Jarman Tilghman, one of the founders of the Salisbury Maryland Kennel Club,
a past president of the Humane Society of Wicomico County and an advocate for Pets on Wheels.

Her husband, M.W. “Bill” Tilghman, and son, M.W. “Mat” Tilghman Jr., donated $25,000 for the dog park, city offiicials said.

Tilghman bred and showed poodles, dachshunds and Shelties, and also counseled hundreds of people through the Kennel Club’s breeding referral program, family members said.

And not a drop to drink

drink

 
As fancy as they are getting, dog parks really only need three basic things — some space, a fence and a source of water.

Kroll Dog Park in Bakersfield, California lacks the latter, and users of the dog park have banded together to do something about it.

The only water source at Kroll is located outside the park, and it has been repeatedly vandalized. A few dog owners took it upon themselves to put out water buckets, but they kept getting stolen.

The city of Bakersfield has said it doesn’t have the funds to install a drinking fountain inside the park, but a pet-sitting business is leading an effort among dog owners to buy one themselves, ABC affilliate KERO reported.

After hearing about the problems,  Fetch Pet Care is helping organize dog owners. A website, ThirstyKrollDogs.com, has been created and work is underway to raise $6,000 to have a water source put in the park.

(Photo: A dog drinks from the fountain at Baltimore’s new Locust Point Dog Park.)

We’ll all end up with moo goo dog pan?

I’m not sure what U.S. Rep. Louie Gohmert, a Republican from Texas, was trying to say when he spoke out against passage of the Great Cats and Rare Canids Act of 2009.

It’s clear he was against the act — that he felt the U.S. was in no position to be assisting other countries in preserving endangered species, that he thinks we’re falling too deeply in debt to China, and that he think it’s ironic that some of the funds authorized in the act might be used for preservation efforts in China

But I’m baffled by his statement that, by borrowing more money from the Chinese, we’ll “end up with moo goo dog pan or moo goo cat pan.”

The Chinese will take control of us and force us to eat dogs and cats, prepared in the style of their cuisine? Give it a listen and, if you figure it out, let me know.

Despite Gohmert’s objections, the Great Cats and Rare Canids Act of 2009, which authorized $50 million to help save snow leopards, wild African dogs and other endangered species, passed the House.

Blind “Idol” contestant receives guide dog

Scott MacIntyre is no longer in the running for “American Idol,” but the blind contestant did win a surprise gift from Paula Abdul last week — a guide dog.

Abdul presented a guide dog to MacIntyre at a Guide Dogs of America event on Friday as part of the official kick-off of  National Guide Dog Month.

MacIntyre had been told he was at the ceremony to perform, but instead Abdul informed him that he would be receiving a guide dog after his upcoming tour, according to a press release.

Abdul, Natural Balance Pet Foods, Petco and independent pet stores nationwide are teaming to raise funds and awareness for guide dogs, with hopes of raising more than $2 million during May.

“Being part of this important cause is truly special and very close to my heart,” said Abdul. “Most people have no idea how much time and money it takes to train these beautiful animals to give such a precious gift to those who need it most. It can take more than two years and $40,000 to properly train a guide dog. Together, we can help guide dog schools provide more of these life-changing partners to people who are blind.”

Throughout the month of May, PETCO’s more than 950 locations nationwide and many independent pet stores will be selling specially marked bags of Natural Balance dog food with Paula Abdul’s picture on them, and donating 50 cents of the purchase price to participating guide dog schools.

PETCO shoppers can also “round up” their purchases at the register to donate the difference to the cause, or make donations directly online at PETCO.com.

“Having Paula Abdul, a huge animal lover, as our spokesperson will help us get the message out to raise money to match people who are visually impaired and in need of these amazing guide dogs”, said Dick Van Patten of Natural Balance Pet Foods.

Izzy (or isn’t he?) getting surgery

Izzy, the retired Longmont, Colorado police dog in need of surgery, will be getting it — thanks to an outpouring of help from residents in the community and beyond.

A drive started by the local Fraternal Order of Police has raised enough money for the operation — from vets, kennels and individuals, including a resident of Las Vegas who came through with $1,000, said Robin L. Ericson, assistant to the chief of the Longmont Police/Fire Department.

The Flatirons Kennel Club has promised to pay $6,000 to cover the cost of his surgery, board member Love Banghart told 9NEWS. “This dog served the community for nine years,” said Banghart. “Any dog that serves the community for that long is very special.”

Izzy sustained a spinal injury catching an armed kidnapping suspect. Since retiring two years ago, the dog’s condition has gotten so bad it is hard for him to walk.

Ericson said that dental and medical benefits are provided to dogs in the city’s K-9 unit, but that those benefits end at retirement, as she says they do for police officers and other department staff.

“A number of people called and donated,” Ericson told ohmidog! — from money to ramps to help Izzy negotiate stairs. Any extra funds received will go toward future care for Izzy and a fund that will provide financial assistance to other retired police dogs.

Ericson said that Izzy’s vet has offered no guarantee that the surgery will help the 11-year-old dog.

She said it was unfortunate that the department termed the dog “equipment” in media reports — but said that’s the name of the official budget category under which the K-9 unit falls. “We love our dogs, and we understand why public wants to help… The term ‘equipment’ might not have been best choice of words.”

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