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Tag: heat

Trial opens in deaths of show dogs

Opening statements were made yesterday in the Missouri trial of Mary Wild, charged with animal abuse in connection with the deaths of seven show dogs who died when left overnight in a hot van last summer.

Wild, a 25-year-old dog handler from Arnold, Missouri, is charged with eight counts of misdemeanor animal abuse — one for each of the dogs she left in the van after returning from a dog show in Iowa last June.

Only one of the dogs, a Siberian husky, survived.

Defense attorney Brad Dede said he would show that “all reasonable and legal precautions” were taken to ensure the safety of the dogs and that his client is not guilty of a crime, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.

Authorities say the temperature inside the van could have reached 120 degrees.

Animal abuse is a Class A misdemeanor in Missouri, and the maximum penalty is up to a year in jail and a fine up to $1,000.

Police dog left in car perishes in Alabama

A police dog in Alabama died Friday after his handler left him inside a patrol car between shifts, police said Monday.

The internal affairs divisionof the Montgomery Police Department is investigating the incident, a spokesman said.

The officer has been transferred from the K9 division and could face further discipline depending on the outcome of the investigation, the Montgomery Advertiser reported.

The dog, named Urso, was laid to rest Monday.

Police said the officer had driven Urso to the Police Department’s kennel mid-morning Friday, but “just forgot” to check him into the kennel. The officer returned to the kennel for his next shift at 8 p.m. and found Urso dead inside the vehicle.

A police spokesman said the officer, who wasn’t named, is “emotionally devastated” by Urso’s death, which is believed to be heat-related.

Urso, a German shepherd, joined the department four years ago after being trained at a facility in North Carolina.

New Orleans officers charged in K-9 deaths

neworleansTwo New Orleans police officers have been charged in connection with the deaths of two police dogs in unrelated incidents.

Jason Lewis, 33, is accused of leaving Primo, a Belgian Malinois, unattended in a police department SUV, leading to the dog’s heat related death.

The case was heavily publicized last summer when the Metropolitan Crime Commission released photographs, including the one above, which shows what Primo did to the vehicle before dying from apparent heat stroke. Lewis was charged with aggravated cruelty to animals.

Sgt. Randy Lewis, a former supervisor in the New Orleans Police Department’s K-9 unit, meanwhile, was charged with malfeasance in office, the New Orleans Times-Picayune reports.

Randy Lewis, 45, was handling another K-9, Phantom, who last May fell down an open elevator shaft at the abandoned Charity Hospital building in downtown New Orleans — while Lewis was moonlighting.  Lewis claimed he was on duty and involved in a training exercise, according to a spokesman for the Orleans Parish district attorney’s office. Actually he was being paid to work on a private security detail.

Neither officer has worked with dogs since the deaths.

Attorneys for the officers said the charges are unfair and they will fight them in court.

“Both of these cases are significant above and beyond the fact that, tragically, an animal lost its life,” said Rafael Goyeneche, president of the Metropolitan Crime Commission, which last summer asked the district attorney’s office to look at the cases. “I think that these cases, both of them, indicate and speak to the police department’s inability to adequately police itself.”

According to an LSU necropsy report, Primo, 6 years old, likely died from shock due to heat stroke. He was taken to a veterinary office with a body temperature of 109.8 degrees.

The other dog, Phantom, died after falling from the 17th floor into an empty elevator shaft at around 9:30 at night on May 21, 2009. According to a report obtained by the Crime Commission, the dog’s body was removed by officers the next morning.

Man sentenced in heat death of Rottweiler

flemmingA Maryland man who tied his dog outside in a hot July sun, with fatal consequences, was ordered to spend 90 days in jail and do 50 hours of community service.

Judge Janice Rodnick Ambrose suggested Michael Patrick Flemming, 24, of Thurmont, do his community service at the Frederick County Animal Control shelter, the Frederick News-Post reported.

“They may not want you,” Ambrose said Tuesday in District Court. “But I think you should have to work with animals for what you’ve done.”

Convicted of four misdemeanor charges in the July 25, 2009, death of Taurus, a 3-year-old black and brown Rottweiler, Flemming offered a brief statement: “There’s no amount of time you can give me that will erase what I have to deal with every day.”

“‘He was my baby,’”  Flemming said in a two-page handwritten statement. “‘I loved him almost more than anyone in my life.’”

Flemming told the court he’d put his dog out to urinate, went inside and fell asleep. He didn’t mention that he chained the dog to a stake, without  water, an omission the judge pointed out.

“You tied your dog up. That’s why you are here today,” Ambrose said. “Your poor dog is dead because you didn’t love it enough to take care of it.”

A landscaper found the 112-pound dog unconscious in the middle of Flemming’s yard and contacted animal control officers, according to court documents.

Flemming has a sentencing hearing set for next week on fleeing and eluding charges, and another hearing next month on drug charges, according to court documents.

Officer who left 2 dogs to die in car is fined

A police dog handler in the UK has been found guilty of animal cruelty for leaving two German shepherds to die in the back of his car on one of the hottest days of last year.

Mark Johnson, of the Nottinghamshire police, was given a six-month conditional discharge and ordered to pay a fine. The judge called it “an extremely difficult case” which reflected poorly on the force’s attitude to officers with mental health problems.

Prosecutors said the animals – Jay-Jay and Jet – died in “excruciating pain” after Johnson ­forgot he had not taken them out of his vehicle on June 30. The dogs died – possibly within 20 minutes of being left in the car– from heatstroke, The Guardian reported

Johnson, 39, said he was severely depressed and was suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder when he left the dogs in the car. He said his illness had caused him to forget that the animals were still in the car as he sat down to do paperwork at Nottinghamshire police’s headquarters.

District judge Tim Devas described the dogs’ deaths as “sad and regrettable”, but criticized the police department for failing to help an officer struggling with depression.

“I feel a police officer has been let down … (T)his is a dreadful error of judgment brought about by an illness way before it happened and PC Johnson should have been given more help … I cannot believe that in the 21st century, depression and men crying is so abhorrent to an institution that nothing can be done about it,” he said.

An assistant chief constable of the Nottinghamshire police said dog handlers must now take their animals directly to kennels on arrival at work and that a system was being piloted alerting handlers to temperature changes inside vehicles.

Officer charged in heat death of K-9 left in car

A Mount Holly K-9 officer and her husband have been charged with animal cruelty in the heat-related death of a bomb-sniffing dog in New Jersey.

Police Officer Kara McIntosh left Patton, a 5-year-old golden retriever, in her personal vehicle on July 7, parking the car across the street from police headquarters and leaving the air conditioner running.

Her husband, Robert, was supposed to pick up the car and dog, but he never came. The dog died of heat stroke after about two hours in the car, the New Jersey SPCA said.

The pair face civil and criminal counts of animal cruelty. If convicted they could face up to a year in prison as well as fines up to $4,000, the Burlington County Times reported.

Police Chief Steven Martin said Friday that McIntosh would remain on active duty until the case is resolved.

Dog dies in car of Richmond SPCA’s CEO

A dog belonging to the chief executive officer of the Richmond SPCA died last week after being left alone for about four hours in her owner’s car, the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports.

Robin Starr, tragically, didn’t know the dog was even in the car until finding him when she went to lunch. Temperature in Richmond, Va.  last Wednesday had reached 91 by noon.

Her husband, Ed Starr said that, as his wife prepared for work, he put the couple’s 16-year-old dog — a deaf and blind mutt named Louie — into her  station wagon. The dog often accompanied Robin Starr to work, and Ed Starr said he forgot to tell her Louie was in her car.

“I just forgot . . . and didn’t think about it until I got this frantic phone call from Robin. I knew immediately what I had done,” he said today.

“At 16, he just laid down where you put him and didn’t make a peep,” Robin Starr said. “He never made a peep in the car; he’d just lay there in the back.”

Robin Starr  took the dog inside to the SPCA clinic, then to an emergency veterinary clinic in Carytown. The dog died about midnight of kidney failure, the Starrs said.

Eight overheated pups found in container

 
Baltimore Animal Rescue & Care Shelter is crediting quick thinking by two young men with helping save the lives of eight puppies found sealed in a plastic container.

“Late yesterday afternoon a litter of eight retriever mix pups were found in the Highland area of Baltimore by two young men. The young men heard a noise from the container and opened it to find eight almost lifeless pups. Their quick actions in trying to cool the pups down with cool water and air conditioning helped save the pups,” said Jennifer Mead-Brause, executive director of BARCS.

The dogs had temperatures of over 107 degrees when they first arrived at BARCS. The pups were then sent to Everhart animal Hospital for further observation.

All the pups appeared to be recovering, without permanent damage – even though temperatures reached nearly 100 degrees.

Plans were to turn the puppies over to Ruff Life Rescue for their continued care and eventual adoption.

Simon says don’t leave dogs in parked cars

It’s strictly coincidental that — at the same time a dog perished in a parked car during “American Idol” auditions — PETA was putting the finishing touches on a public service announcement by Simon Cowell about the dangers of leaving dogs in parked cars.

Now, though, PETA is rushing the “Idol” judge’s PSA to television stations across the country.

“Far be it from me to be critical, but I find it really appalling that, this year, thousands of dogs will die of heatstroke inside parked cars,” Cowell says in the spot, in which he appears with his canine pal, Claude. “Never ever leave your dog inside a parked car. Your dog idolizes you. In warm weather, keep him safe at home.”

PETA hopes the PSA might deter further deaths as summertime temperatures rise.

Quincy Vanderbilt, a 24-year-old from North Dakota, left his small terrier in his vehicle while he and his girlfriend lined up for Denver auditions for the show.

When he returned — nine hours later — the dog was dead. Vanderbilt was cited on a misdemeanor charge of animal cruelty.

“Simon would be shocked to know that this incident happened during auditions for his own show,” PETA Vice President Daphna Nachminovitch, said in a press release. “Even on merely warm days, it’s better to be safe than sorry and plan to leave your animal companions comfortably at home.”

Dog dies in car during American Idol tryout

A 24-year-old man from North Dakota is facing animal cruelty charges after police say he left his dog in the car while his girlfriend auditioned for “American Idol” in Denver.

Police say Quincy Vanderbilt has been charged with one count of animal cruelty, 9 News in Denver reported.

According to police, Vanderbilt, who was visiting Denver from North Dakota, left his dog in a car parked near INVESCO Field at Mile High. When he checked on the dog later in the afternoon, it was dead.

The Denver District Attorney’s office says Vanderbilt had come to Denver with his girlfriend, who was auditioning for “American Idol.”

He is due in court on Aug. 20.

Denver Animal Care and Control reminded residents that it only takes minutes for a pet left in a hot car to die from heatstroke or suffocation. On a 78 degree day, temperatures in a car can soar to 90 degrees if it’s left in the shade and hit 160 degrees if it’s parked in the sun.

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