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Tag: huntington beach

Top 10 dog-friendly beaches in America

wildwooddogbeach

We put about as much stock in top 10 lists as we do in predicting dog behavior based on breed, but for the record here are what voters selected as the 10 best dog friendly beaches in the U.S.

Receiving the most votes from readers of 10Best, a feature of USA Today, was Montrose Dog Beach in Chicago, which offers a fenced in area where off leash dogs can splash in the waters of Lake Michigan.

Coming in second was Wildwood Dog Beach in New Jersey, easily spotted by the 25-foot-tall fire hydrant sculpture rising from the sand. Dogs are required to be on leashes.

Only one North Carolina beach made the list. Coming in third was Bald Head Island, where unleashed dogs are allowed on all 14 miles of coastline from sunrise to sunset. The island is accessible only by a ferry boat, which is also dog-friendly.

Also making the top five were Rosie’s Dog Beach in Long Beach, Calif., the only legal off-leash dog beach in Los Angeles County, and
First Landing State Park Beach in Virginia Beach

cannonbeachflickrRounding out the top 10 were, in this order, Long Beach Peninsula in Long Beach, Wash.; Huntington Dog Beach in Huntington Beach, Calif.; Cannon Beach in Oregon; Double Bluff Beach in South Whidbey Island, Wash.; and Jupiter Dog Beach in Florida.

Readers voted on 20 nominees chosen by Bringfido.com, a doggy travel website.

(Photos: At top, Wildwood Dog Beach, courtesy of Wildwoods; bottom, Cannon Beach in Oregon by Breanna Agnor / Flickr)

Dog left tied to train tracks finds new home


A dog left tied to train tracks in California last month has found a new home.

Unlike that day last month, when he was secured to the tracks in the path of an oncoming train, he had many options to choose from.

Officials at Riverside County’s Department of Animal Services said they received more than 1,300 emails from people interested in adopting the rescued dog they dubbed Banjo. He was found by a Union Pacific crew in Mecca, where he’d been tied to the rails by a man who told authorities the dog was no longer wanted.

The 11-month-old poodle-terrier mix went home Friday with Jeff and Louisa Moore of Huntington Beach.

“He’s so beautiful isn’t he?” Louisa (above) said to her husband, holding Banjo in her arms for the first time.

Letters of interest came in from as far away as England and Puerto Rico, but animal services officials said the Moores were chosen because they constantly checked in on Banjo via e-mail and live close to the beach and a dog park.

Jeff Moore said he and his wife applied to adopt Banjo after seeing his story on the news and Facebook.

“Tonight we’re just going to go home and hang out,” Jeff told the Desert Sun in Palm Beach. “We have a big field that’s right next to our place that about a dozen of us all go out with our dogs, and they all get along really well, so it’ll be fun introducing him to all the dogs. I’m sure they’ll love him.”

Before the couple left, Jo Marie Upegui, a veterinarian technician at Coachella Valley Animal Campus, explained to them that Banjo liked tortillas and snuggling on the couch and that he feared brooms and men in uniform.

The Moores, who also have a Tibetan terrier named Lali, said they planed to create a Facebook page to keep those interested up to date on Banjo’s new life.

Banjo’s name refers to old traffic signals on rail lines. He was discovered when a westbound train crew noticed a hunched-over man walking away from the tracks, leaving the dog behind. The crew alerted dispatchers, who stopped the eastbound train coming down the tracks to which Banjo was tied.

A 78-year-old man was questioned, but not charged. He appeared confused and possibly suffering from dementia. He told investigators his family no longer wanted the dog and didn’t know what to do with him.

(Photo: Riverside County Department of Animal Services)

Dogs hit the surf for charity in California

California dogs hit the surf in Huntington Beach over the weekend for a new charity event called the Surf City Surf Dog Competition. Here (after the obligatory advertisement — how better to sell gasoline than with a dancing dog?) is a news report on the event.