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Tag: improvements

Maryland SPCA announces major expansion

A major expansion of the adoption center at the Maryland SPCA was announced last week.

“We need facilities to reflect the changes that have enabled us to adopt out every healthy pet in our adoption program for the last two-and-a-half years,” Mary-Ann Pinkard, board president, said at the March 11 reception where the announcement was made.

The expansion will include creation of the Morton Gorn Center for Animal Adoption, a new area for adoption interviews, a waiting area, office space and two “animal showcases” for dog and cat housing of “long-timers” to promote their adoption.

A new animal intake center, separate from the adoption area, is also planned, including spaces to  assess animal behavior and a dog exam room.

Construction is scheduled to begin this summer, and work is expected to be completed within six months.

Other projects announced will be an expanded cat room, fire safety improvements, and improved accessibility.

The new adoption center is being named in memory of Morton Gorn, a real estate developer who cherished his dogs and his horses. The gift to name the center in his memory was made by his widow, Arlene Gorn, who was introduced to the Maryland SPCA by her daughter, Karen Colvin.

“Mrs. Gorn and the Colvins motivated and inspired us to move forward with this project at a time when many people were pulling back because of the economy,” said Aileen Gabbey, SPCA executive director. “Their generosity was an important cornerstone to making this project happen.”

The project is estimated to cost $1.8 million.

Robert E. Lee Park will rise again

releemastoffBaltimore County plans to spend $6 million in local and state funds to begin the first phase of improvements to Robert E. Lee Park — one of which is to establish a dog park within the park’s 415 acres.

Long a popular, but unsanctioned spot for dogs to run off-leash, the park — owned by Baltimore City but located within the county — remains officially closed. The footbridge leading to it was condemned as unsafe and recently demolished. The county will soon sign a long-term lease and take over management of the park.

While there is pressure from some groups to declare parts of the park off limits to dogs, plans call for a fenced-in area where dogs can run unleashed, and have access to the water. In all other areas of the park, dogs will have to remain on leash — a rule that will be enforced by park rangers.DSC02802

Work on a new bridge, estimated to cost about $2.8 million, is to begin in March and take about six months to complete. Construction of a fenced dog park and trails will start in late spring, the Baltimore Sun reports.

Plans call for the park to include a nature center, hiking and biking trails, fountains, benches, restrooms and improved access to Lake Roland.DSC02811

I took these photos at the park last year, while it was still open, but a little down at the heels. I’m fairly certain dogs, leashed or unleashed, didn’t vandalize the signs — more likely unleashed humans.

Upgraded Robert E. Lee Park to have dog area

DSC02761Robert E. Lee Park — a perennial  favorite of Baltimore dogs — is scheduled to get an official dog park built within its boundaries, which may not necessarily be the good news it sounds like for dog owners who like to let their pets romp off leash.

Baltimore County will be taking over management of the park and spending $6 million to make repairs and improvements, including reconstructing and re-opening the pedestrian bridge, restoring the existing trails, installing parking and setting up a secure dog park, according to the Towson Times.

Bob Barrett, director of the county’s Department of Recreation and Parks, said the dog park will be the only part of the entire 453-acre property where dogs can be off leash.

The park, located in the county but owned by the city, has long served as an unofficial off-leash area — to the pleasure of dog owners, but to the chagrin of some nearby homeowners.

Barrett said the county plans to spend $2 million on the dog park and erosion control measures, nearly $3 million for bridge replacement and more than $1 million on parking. He said work will begin after the county signs a long- term lease with the city. It will take up to 16 months to complete the improvements, he said.

More than 41,000 people visit the park each year, which includes Lake Roland. The lake was created by the damming of Jones Falls in 1861 to produce one of the first municipal water supplies for the city. The city stopped using the lake for drinking water in 1915.

About $3 million of the $6 million for the restoration of the park came from the state, according to Barrett. The county matched the amount.

LA County looks at puppy mill law

The Los Angeles County supervisors have unanimously approved a motion to seek broader oversight over  “puppy mills,” according to the Los Angeles Times.

The motion calls on the county’s chief executive, county counsel and various county departments to report back in 45 days with proposals for legal changes that would improve the quality of care and ensure safe and responsible breeding at high volume kennels and breeding operations.

Supervisor Michael Antonovich said that during the last six months the county has had to seize or relocate hundreds of puppies and dogs from so-called puppy mills, increasing the burden on county animal shelters. “This is cruel for the animals and places a tremendous burden on county taxpayers,” Antonovich said.

oooooooohmidog! We’re six months old!

 
We thought we’d take this occasion — our 500th post — to bring you up to date on how ohmidog! is doing. We are, after all, turning six months old on Sunday.

Since we started in August, our readership — both in terms of visitors and page views — has been doubling about every month. In the last month alone, nearly 35,000 of you stopped by, visiting nearly 50,000 pages. We’ve hooked up with 10 sponsors, whose advertisements can be seen running down the rail to the left. We’ve become an official news organization, at least in the eyes of Google, which  now includes our posts in its “news” search.

We’ve (temporarily at least) reclaimed our banner space — used for advertising in most blogs – and instituted a “best of ohmidog!” feature that has proven popular. Our “Behave!” column kicked off last month, a monthly feature about dog training and behavioral issues. (You can find the link to its archives on the tabs on our right-side rail.)

We’ve done our best to keep up with local purveyors of dog goods and services, which we list for free in our “Doggie directory,” and tried as well to keep up with area dog-related events (see “Doggie Doings”) — also findable through the tabs on the right. We’ve done a bit of doggie do-gooding, taking part in BARCStoberfest as an official sponsor and raising money for BARCS Franky Fund for sick and injured animals.

We’ve held true to our mission — staying on top of dog news (and sometimes even having it first) and, while not proclaiming ourselves spokesman for dogs, watching out for their interests and well-being and making the public aware of any threats thereto.

We also have avoided using fancy words like “thereto,” at least up to now.

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