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Tag: interspecies

Ooda lalley, ooda lalley, golly what a day

We love dogs. We love depictions of interspecies harmony. And danged if we don’t love Roger Miller.

So even though its cast is made up of various members of the animal kingdom — not just the dogs we normally feature in our “Woof in Advertising” pieces — we’re pretty crazy about this recent ad for Android phones.

We especially like the tagline: “Be Together. Not the Same.”

wiaMany of the interspecies friends shown in the ad have been featured before here on ohmidog!, including Roscoe and Suryia, the coonhound and orangutan who appear at the beginning of the commercial.

The ad doesn’t make me want to buy an Android phone.

But it does make me happy.

How can such scenes of interspecies friendship not make you joyful, especially when you throw in the phrase “Ooda Lalley?

(According to Urban Dictionary, it’s a term popularized in the 1950s, meaning yay or yippee.)

Now all we have to do is figure out what “Do-Wacka-Do” means, and whether it’s possible that — with enough interspecies harmony — we CAN roller skate in a buffalo herd.

Dog in France gets the seal of approval, or at least the approval of a seal

We won’t be so anthropomorphic as to insist what you’re watching above is a “tender moment” between two species.

(But we will — privately — feel all warm inside and silently go “awwwwwwww.”)

This seal flopped his way up to a yellow Labrador on a beach in southwestern France and seemingly embraced him — as much as one with flippers can embrace.

The dog, meanwhile, took it all in stride.

The video was shot at Le Cap Ferret and uploaded earlier this month by YouTube user Elise Frebourg.

Do you want music with that?

We can’t tell whether this dining dog appreciates the musical accompaniment this cockatiel is providing.

On the one hand, the dog doesn’t gobble up the bird, snarl or bark at it, or make the slightest effort to make it go away.

On the other hand, the dog — in what’s uncommon behavior for most members of the species — does leave before finishing the meal.

We could spend hours trying to interpret things, or fretting about the potential dangers of this situation — and you can be sure, on the Internet, many are doing just that.

Instead, we’re just going to enjoy it.

A piglet and a pit bull

For some reason, Pigalina was rejected by her mother, but she’s found a substitute in a member of another species — Levi, a four-year-old pit bull.

The piglet, three-weeks-old when this video was made, lives at PIGS Animal Sanctuary in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. Levi, a rescued dog, was living there when she arrived — and obviously is used to being crawled upon by piglets.

The sanctuary, founded in 1992, specializes in the care of potbellied pigs and farm pigs, and it shelters other farm animals and pets as well. About 400 animals — pigs, dogs, cats, horses and goats among them — are living there.

You can learn more about out what’s going on at PIGS Animal Sanctuary by visiting its Facebook page.

Penny and Roo: A chicken and a Chihuahua

Roo, a Chihuahua, was found freezing in a ditch, where he’d apparently been discarded after being born with no front legs.

Penny is a silky chicken who was once used for experiments at an area veterinary school.

penny-rooBoth ended up at Duluth Animal Hospital in Georgia, where they’ve become best of friends, and a popular attraction.

The dog, believed to have been abandoned by a backyard breeder when he was just seven weeks old, was found on Christmas day, 2013, under some leaves in a ditch.

The chicken, once the undisclosed experiments she was part of were completed, was likely going to be put down, but an offer was made to adopt her.

Officially, both now belong to an employee at the animal hospital in Gwinnett, Alicia Williams, who brings Roo and Penny with work to her most days.

Williams, the client services receptionist at Duluth Animal Hospital, told Channel 2 Action News the dog and chicken became friends immediately, and some clients schedule appointments for their pets when they know the two will be there.

They’re gaining popularity nationwide, too, through the animal hospital’s Facebook page, and a video (above) recently posted on YouTube.

Roo manages to get around on just his hind legs, but he’s also been outfitted with a special wheelchair.

(Photo: On an outing during the recent Georgia snowfall, Penny and Roo left some interesting tracks / Facebook)

Woof in Advertising: Budweiser’s Puppy Love

I predict this 60-second Budweiser commercial is going to cause more tears than any fumble, any interception, or even the final outcome of Sunday’s Super Bowl.

Called “Puppy Love,” the ad depicts a special friendship between a yellow lab puppy and a group of Clydesdales.

As the storyline goes, the puppy and the Clydesdales have become best of interspecies friends while residing at ”Warm Springs Puppy Adoption Center.”

WIAWhen the day comes for the puppy to go to a new home, he clearly doesn’t want to leave. And the horses don’t want him to go either.

When his new owner finally gets him in the car and takes off, the Clydesdales stage a coup.

They chase after the car as the pup sadly looks back out the window. They block the car’s path, and the next thing we see is pup and Clydesdales happily trotting back to the farm.

It’s all set to the tune of “Let Her Go” by Passenger.

The ad was posted on YouTube four days before Super Bowl XLVIII, and in less than a day it was viewed by more than 4 million.

(WIA is an occasional feature in ohmidog! that looks at how dogs are used in advertising)

Another unlikely friendship: A dog and a fox

dogandfox1

We humans, with our vastly superior intellects, and being the far more evolved and civilized species, don’t need no stinkin’ animals to show us how to live life.

Do we?

You’d think not — especially with Christmas approaching. Between all the peace, good will and fellowship the season supposedly brings, and all the attention, with his death, on Nelson Mandela’s legacy of kindness and forgiveness, we shouldn’t be needing, right now, any furry creatures reminding us bigger-brained, two-legged types how to get along with each other.

Yet, in the past month, they seem to keep doing so — almost as if they think the message has failed to get through.

First, it’s a goose and a dog partnering up in the UK. Then it’s an elk and a dog becoming backyard playmates in Washington state. Both pairs were shown at play, raising the question, at least in some heads, if animals of different sizes and species — like elephants and dogs, or cats and crows – can get along with each other, why can’t we?

Now comes this latest pair, a fox and a dog in Norway who met in the woods last summer and became fast friends.

dogandfox2

Norwegian photographer Torgeir Berge was out for a walk with his four-year-old German shepherd, Tinni, when they encountered an abandoned baby fox. Since then the fox, which Berge named Sniffer, has regularly met up with them on their trips through the woods, and Berge has been taking pictures of the get-togethers.

Now he’s working on a book about the unlikely friendship with writer Berit Helberg, who told TODAY.com that the fox was probably an orphan whose mother had died, and was probably seeking food, help and company.

“Not many people are privileged to see and enjoy a friendship like this, but Torgeir Berge has both seen them in action and gotten the opportunity to catch this in images that don’t need words,” Helberg wrote in post. They hope the story will raise awareness for animal rights and the conditions that some animals are forced live in as a result of the fur trade, Helberg said.

dogandfox3

Yes, animals of different species far more often kill and eat each other to survive. And these unlikely interspecies friendships, seemingly choreographed from the grave (or wherever he is) of Walt Disney, are the exception. It’s not like animals got together and said ”Let’s rethink this whole survival of the fittest thing, and live together in harmony, eating wild berries.”

It was from animals, after all, that we most likely learned that mindset — that the world belongs to the fittest, richest or whoever roars the loudest.

Heartwarming as these unlikely friendship stories are, they’re not messages being sent to humans by animals.

But, particularly at Christmas, they are messages worth receiving, and learning from.

(Photos by Torgeir Berge, via Today.com)

autocad 2014