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Tag: izzy

A blast from the past — of soda water

Here’s a vintage video — circa mid1980s — that’s funny enough on its own. Throw in the disco hairstyles, and the fact that the deadpan British pub owner is speaking Japanese to German shepherds, while Dutch subtitles run across the screen, and I’d have to call it a classic.

Dogs and politics, mixing some more

If you are among those wondering about the news media’s preoccupation with the Obama’s dog choice — amid all the other serious problems our country is facing — join the club.

Also count among its members one Julianne Hancock, a member of the Utah Air National Guard who has served a tour of duty in Iraq. When she got back, she got a dog from a shelter, a mutt named Izzy.  

A steady job, though, was not so easy to find. After losing her civilian job in the commercial lending industry earlier this year, she was having trouble finding new work. She couldn’t afford healthcare. With few other options, she signed up for another tour of duty. She leaves in January.

“I heard Mr. Obama tell Malia and Sasha that they earned their puppy on election night,” Hancock wrote in an open letter to Obama posted on The Daily Kos. “Izzy will be looking for a family. Any interest?”

Read more »

Izzy (or isn’t he?) getting surgery

Izzy, the retired Longmont, Colorado police dog in need of surgery, will be getting it — thanks to an outpouring of help from residents in the community and beyond.

A drive started by the local Fraternal Order of Police has raised enough money for the operation — from vets, kennels and individuals, including a resident of Las Vegas who came through with $1,000, said Robin L. Ericson, assistant to the chief of the Longmont Police/Fire Department.

The Flatirons Kennel Club has promised to pay $6,000 to cover the cost of his surgery, board member Love Banghart told 9NEWS. “This dog served the community for nine years,” said Banghart. “Any dog that serves the community for that long is very special.”

Izzy sustained a spinal injury catching an armed kidnapping suspect. Since retiring two years ago, the dog’s condition has gotten so bad it is hard for him to walk.

Ericson said that dental and medical benefits are provided to dogs in the city’s K-9 unit, but that those benefits end at retirement, as she says they do for police officers and other department staff.

“A number of people called and donated,” Ericson told ohmidog! — from money to ramps to help Izzy negotiate stairs. Any extra funds received will go toward future care for Izzy and a fund that will provide financial assistance to other retired police dogs.

Ericson said that Izzy’s vet has offered no guarantee that the surgery will help the 11-year-old dog.

She said it was unfortunate that the department termed the dog “equipment” in media reports — but said that’s the name of the official budget category under which the K-9 unit falls. “We love our dogs, and we understand why public wants to help… The term ‘equipment’ might not have been best choice of words.”

The K-9 kiss-off: Friends with no benefits

Izzy was a police dog in Longmont, Colorado until an on-the-job injury led to his retirement. Now, more than two years later, he’s in need of surgery — related to that injury — that could cost $6,000.

That the Fraternal Order of Police in Longmont is turning to the public to try and raise that money is noble.

That they are forced to is wrong.

“He worked for us for nine years and he did a lot of good work in those nine years,” Detective Steve Schulz, president of the Longmont FOP, told the Longmont Times-Call.

As I see it, Longmont owes Izzy for that.

A police dog that serves his city — like a soldier who serves his country — deserves to be taken care of by that city, especially when his injuries are related to that service.

And he deserves to be taken care of FOREVER.

Unfortunately, that’s rarely the case. Retired police dogs in some jurisdictions are euthanized when their service is complete. Others allow them to retire and remain in the care of their partner/handler.

At that point, as with Izzy, the city cuts off any assistance with care, feeding or veterinary bills.

As Izzy’s handler, Detective Bruce Vaughan pointed out, in the city’s view, dogs are “equipment.”

Izzy was injured while helping catch a suspect in April 2007.  After crashing his truck in a high-speed chase, the suspect ran. Izzy chased him down. In the fray that followed, the dog was flipped over and suffered an injury to his spine, which Vaughan said has been diagnosed as a ruptured disk.

The suspect, who had led police on two previous chases,and reportedly had pointed a gun at the head of two different women, was convicted in December 2007 on menacing and drug charges and sentenced to 13 years in prison.

Other than the injury, which makes it difficult for the dog to use his hind legs, Vaughan said, Izzy is healthy. “He still has a puppy face. He’s got a lot of energy,” he said.

Donations for the surgery, estimated to cost $6,000, can be made to FOP No. 6 K9 Fund, in care of Guarantee Bank and Trust, P.O. Box 1159, Longmont, Colo. 80502.

Dog-lovers, I suspect, will likely come through for Izzy.

It’s a shame that city he served did not.