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Tag: joke

World’s oldest wiener …………. NOT

Hotdog

 
Just when I proclaim this quite a week for wieners (dogs and franks), there’s more late breaking wiener news: The world’s oldest hot dog — possibly the world’s first hot dog — has been unearthed at Coney Island, CNN and others reported.

CNN posted a story about the “discovery” of a “140-year-old hot dog” after officials at the Coney Island History Project put an “ancient” frankfurter — bun and all — on display, saying it was unearthed during the demolition of Feltman’s Kitchen, said to be where the first hot dog was made.

“1st Hot Dog,” read a sign next to the display. To the embarassment of CNN and others who picked up the story — to be frank, they didn’t check the facts — it was all just a publicity stunt, aimed at creating interest in an exhibition this summer of real artifacts from the Feltman’s site, the New York Post says.

“The recent discovery by an amateur archaeologist of the ‘140 Year Old Feltman’s Hot Dog’ encased in ice along with a bun, [and] an original receipt from Feltman’s, … was a publicity stunt in the grand tradition of Coney Island ballyhoo,” said Tricia Vita, spokeswoman for the history project.

She said that the hoax was an example of Coney Island’s history of P.T. Barnum-type hype. Even though the ancient hot dog was said to be found “encased in ice” by archaelogists, the story was gobbled right up.

(It was Barnum, I believe, who said a sucker was born every minute. That rate has increased to about every millisecond, thanks to the Internet.)

“I was surprised in the beginning at how many people believed it was true,” Vita said. “But after reading all the buzz about it on Twitter and the Internet, I’m not really that surprised because people want to believe these types of things are true.”

The high cost of second (and third) opinions

An oldie but a goodie:

A woman brought a very limp duck into the office of a veterinary surgeon. She laid her pet on the table and the vet pulled out his stethoscope to listen to the bird’s chest.

After a moment or two, the vet shook his head sadly and said, “I’m sorry, ma’am, your duck has passed away.”

The distressed woman wailed, “Are you sure?”

“Yes, I am sure,” replied the vet. “The duck is dead,” .

“How can you be so sure?” she protested. “He might just be in a coma or something.”

The vet left the room and returned a few minutes later with a Labrador Retriever.

As the duck’s owner looked on, the dog stood on his hind legs, put his front paws on the examination table, sniffed the duck and barked twice. The vet took the dog out of the room, returning with a cat. The cat jumped on the table and looked the duck over, then jumped back down and strolled out of the room.

The vet looked at the woman and said, “I’m sorry, but as I said, your duck is dead.”

Turning to his computer terminal, the vet hit a few keys and printed out a bill, which he handed to the owner.

“One hundred and fifty dollars!” she cried, “just to tell me my duck is dead?”

The vet shrugged, “I’m sorry. If you had just taken my word for it, the bill would have been $20, but with the Lab Report and the Cat Scan it’s now $150.”

Toshiba announces laptop computer for dogs

Just in time for April Fools, Toshiba has introduced the PetBook K9 — the world’s first laptop computer for dogs.

With a “delicious and durable organic rawhide casing,” a 3.3 megapixel doggie cam for inter-canine video conferencing and bark to text software (included), the PetBook is protected against saliva by special SlobberGuard technology.

You can find all the details here.