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Tag: labrador

Go ahead, make Eastwood’s day

eastwood

A statewide Empty the Shelters event Saturday was a huge success, with more than 2,500 dogs and cats being adopted from 65 shelters and rescues across Michigan.

Nearly 20 shelters managed to find homes for all their residents, including the Little Traverse Bay Humane Society — almost.

There, the only one not celebrating was Eastwood.

The red Labrador retriever, who has some vision problems and congenital leg deformities, found himself the only dog left in the shelter.

eastwood2“Poor Eastwood is so lonely now that all of his pals have been adopted,” the humane society said in a Facebook post.

“Eastwood is the only dog left at the shelter after Empty the Shelters on Saturday, but we know the perfect home is out there somewhere. This amazing boy has a few health issues that need to be addressed (which is why we think he was abandoned initially, poor guy!), but this boy is so sweet, we know it will be well worth it.”

The shelter estimated the future surgeries Eastwood may need could be more than $4,000.

“Although we understand this is a lot to take on for most families, we are committed to finding the perfect fit for Eastwood.”

Saturday’s Empty the Shelters event was sponsored by the Bissell Pet Foundation in hopes of reducing the number of animals euthanized each year. During the event, the foundation covers the adoption fees, which run about $150 per dog on average.

The late-breaking good news? After Eastwood’s lonesome mug appeared in a Facebook post, more than 80 people applied to adopt him.

Humane society staff picked the one that appeared to be the best fit, and Eastwood will soon be moving to his new home.

It was a few days later than every other dog in the shelter got adopted, but, happily, somebody made Eastwood’s day.

(Photos courtesy of Little Traverse Bay Humane Society)

Man jumps in a lake to save dog from an alligator on a Florida golf course

coppsandcarbonWhen Donald C. Copps saw an alligator swimming directly toward a dog in a lake he didn’t give a second thought to jumping in to try and save the black Lab.

And it wasn’t even his dog.

Copps was taking care of a friend’s dog, named Carbon, when the dog — an accomplished dock diver — jumped in the lake. Copps and two friends were hitting balls on a golf course when they noticed a 7-foot alligator making a beeline for the dog.

Without fully thinking about his actions, Copps said, he jumped in and yelled and splashed to distract the gator, and his friends hollered as well.

The alligator bit Carbon’s left thigh, but the dog managed to get out of the lake.

“By the time I gathered my senses, the dog was out of the water and I’m in it up to my chest, just feet from the gator,” Copps said, recounting the late January incident in an interview with the Naples Daily News.

Copps hurried ashore and, with his friends, Brian and Yuliya Vail, loaded the dog on a golf cart and took him to a vet. Carbon was treated for scrapes and puncture wounds.

“The dog was really lucky,” said Dr. Lon Miyahira, the veterinarian who treated Carbon “When I hear alligator bite or attack, I expect worse. It’s hard to recommend jumping into the water, but it’s probably why the dog was not badly injured.”

Copps said Carbon was sore and bothered by the cone he was required to wear after the attack, but within a week he was running around the house.

Copps, who lost his own dog, a yellow Lab, in 2015, is looking after Carbon for a few months while his owners are on a cruise.

Friend Yuliya Vail described his actions as heroic: “I think most people would freeze. He jumped in …That gator could’ve drowned Carbon. We could have watched him die.”

(Photo: Copps and Carbon on a return visit to the vet, by Luke Franke / Naples Daily News)

“They were the best person for the job”

A home improvement store says a disabled vet and his service dog were “the best person for the job.”

So now you can find them, in matching employee vests, helping customers at the Lowe’s in Abilene.

Clay Luthy says he has had Charlotte since she was a puppy.

texas-lowes-dog“She was never supposed to be a service dog. I found out a couple years ago she was alerting me and I didn’t even know it,” said Luthy, who always has Charlotte at his side at work.

“I was trying to figure out where I could go that would be a good fit and it wouldn’t mind having Charlotte, and my wife said I was at Lowe’s so much anyway, I might as well get a job there,” he told KIDY.

“We knew he was gonna make a great employee – we just got the benefit of getting Charlotte right along with him,” said Jay Fellers, Lowe’s human resources manager.

The duo has been getting some news coverage since Judy Dechert Rose, a customer at Lowe’s, posted the image online last week:

“This is a retired vet who struggled to get a job because he needs his service dog! Lowes hired them BOTH!!” she wrote.

Luthy, who served in the Air Force, said he was surprised when it went viral.

“By the time I looked at it, there was 1,000 comments on it. Oh my gosh, it was ridiculous,” he said.

It wasn’t the first Lowe’s to hire an employee AND his service dog.

Back in June, a Lowe’s in Saskatchewan was in the news for hiring Owen Lima and his dog Blue.

(Photo: Facebook)

Dog’s ashes mixed with ink for tattoo

treotattooWe thought we’d heard of every way there is to immortalize a beloved canine companion — from taxidermy to cloning, from turning ashes into jewelry to inserting ashes into a stuffed animal —  but this is a new one on us.

A British ex-soldier has paid tribute to the dog he served with in Afghanistan by getting a tattoo on his leg, made from ink mixed with the animal’s ashes.

Treo, a bomb-detecting black Lab, moved in with his handler after the two left the Army at about the same time.

Treo died in October at the age of 14, and now Dave Heyhoe, an ex-sergeant, wears a tattoo on his calf of Treo’s pawprint and 80 words relating to how the  dog loyally served his handler.

“The tattoo completes me,” the former serviceman from Cheshire told the Daily Mail. “People might think it’s strange, but Treo was like a son to me, and his death has knocked me for six.

“Over the years we have seen gunfire, death and bomb scares together – I’ve been lost without him. Now it feels like Treo is by my side – where he’s supposed to be.”

heyhoetreo

During his service, the black Labrador is said to have prevented the deaths of dozens of British troops. He was awarded the Dickin Medal in 2010 for his service.

That tattoo is not Heyhoe’s only tribute to the dog.

He also wrote a book about him, “It’s All About Treo, Life, Love and War with the World’s Bravest Dog.”

(Photos: SWNS/Daily Mail)

Black lab has Michael Jackson’s disease

rowdy

Rowdy has been poisoned by river water and shot by police officers, but it’s a far less threatening skin condition that gives the 13-year-old black Lab his unique look

Rowdy has vitiligo, a disease whose most famous victim was Michael Jackson. In Rowdy’s case, it causes him to lose color in different patches on his body.

rowdy2Rowdy has lost the color pigmentation around his eyes, making him look like he’s wearing a mask.

“He’s like our own little celebrity around town,” Rowdy’s owner, Tim Umbenhower told KPTV. “Everybody loves to stop us and wonder what we did to him or if we painted it on there.”

Umbenhower and his wife Niki, who livein Canby, Oregon, say Rowdy survived poisoning by river water and had to have his stomach pumped.

He was also once accidentally shot by police during what they thought was a burglary.

Niki, on her Facebook page, mentions the possibility of appearing on The Ellen Show and in a movie — and while she might just be joking, stranger things have happened.

(Photos: Niki Beiser Umbenhower’s Facebook page)

Lucky Lab doubles couple’s lottery winnings

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A UK couple is £300,000 richer thanks to persistence, their Labrador retriever and a little luck.

Make that a lot of luck.

Jane and Alan Slater, of the Isle of Wight, had been playing the EuroMillions Lottery for 20 years — always the same numbers.

On Sept. 29, Mr. Slater, a customer relations manager for a ferry company, got home from work, checked the winning numbers and saw that they had matched all five of them. The payout was about £150,000.

A few gleeful days later, they took their dogs, Ruby and Kai, for a walk. Getting back in the car, Ruby bumped into a catalogue, causing a slip of paper inside of it to come out and float to the ground.

?????????????????????“I really can’t explain the way this piece of paper floated, it was like you see in slow motion in films, as though someone wanted me to notice it,” Mrs. Slater, 59, said. “I immediately reached down and picked up the slip of paper which turned out to be a lottery ticket.”

For the same drawing.

At first, Mrs. Slater thought Mr. Slater might have taken the winning ticket she had bought to work to show friends, and then left it in the car. She was a little upset about that on the ride home.

When they got home, and found the original winning ticket, they figured out what happened.

Mr. Slater, 65, not realizing his wife had bought a ticket, had bought one as well — for the same drawing, with the same numbers.

Suddenly they were not just £150,000 richer, but twice that.

“The ticket could so easily have disappeared in the rubbish when I tidied up the car, we couldn’t help feel that someone was looking down on us,” he is quoted as saying in an article in The Telegraph.

He said Ruby’s “discovery” came on her second birthday.

Now the couple is considering retiring a little earlier than they had planned, and holding a big family party.

“We are a very close family and the wins mean we will be able to help our two children in the future,” Mr. Slater said. “There will be a big family party later in the year and a few more treats for Ruby and Kai.”

(Photos from The Telegraph)

Miss Babe Ruth retiring after nine years as “bat dog” for the Greensboro Grasshoppers

missbaberuth

Miss Babe Ruth, the 9-year-old Lab who has retrieved more than 5,000 bats as the official bat dog of the Greensboro Grasshoppers, is retiring this week.

She’ll be around for the rest of the season, but will retrieve her last bat in Wednesday’s home game against the visiting Durham Bulls, according to the Charlotte Observer.

After her full retirement, she’ll be replaced by a new bat dog, Miss Lou Lou Gehrig, but team members will still have her teeth marks — left on many a bat — to remember her by.

Miss Babe has been the bat and ball dog of the Grasshoppers since 2006. She delivers a bucket of baseballs to the umpire in the first and fifth innings, retrieves Grasshopper bats in the third inning and runs the bases when the game is over.

Her Wednesday appearance will be her 649th consecutive home game in a career that saw her deliver about 4,000 balls, retrieve 5,000 bats, and gain national media exposure.

She has generated more than $200,000 in sponsorship fees since her first game on Aug. 2, 2006, has her own “Babe’s Buddies” fan club, and has a burger named after her at the concession stand.

“She loves it. She gets excited when the crowd gets excited,” said Grasshoppers President Donald Moore.

A retirement party was held for her at Saturday night’s game, where she received a key to the city from Mayor Nancy Vaughan and walked down a red carpet from the pitcher’s mound to home plate to deliver the game ball to the umpire.

Both Miss Lou Lou Gehrig and Master Yogi Berra, both related to Miss Babe, are also fixtures at the Grasshopper’s downtown stadium. Moore brings all three along on game days.

Grasshoppers manager Kevin Randel said the players enjoy their canine teammates: “The only knock on it is they get little teeth marks on the bats.”

Babe’s designated successor, Miss Lou Lou Gehrig, is owned by Moore’s son, Donald Moore Jr. Lou Lou is already adept at fetching bats and delivering balls. “She’s perfectly capable of taking over from Babe,” Moore said.

Miss Babe Ruth’s legacy will live on after she retires. Her ball bucket will go to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, N.Y.

(Photo by Jack Horan / Charlotte Observer)