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Tag: long island

Long Island dog pulls deer out of the sound

An English golden retriever out for a walk along the Long Island Sound saw something flailing in the water, swam out to it, and hauled a young deer back to shore by the scruff of its neck.

Mark Freeley was walking his two dogs, Storm and Sarah, when Storm sprang into action and pulled the fawn ashore.

Once on the sand the fawn got to its feet ran a few steps before collapsing. At that point, Storm layed down beside it, nudged it with his nose and began pawing it until it responded.

Freeley captured the incident on video (above), narrating as he filmed and shouting “Storm bring him in … Good boy Storm, bring him in.” He sounded 95 percent sure Storm’s intention was to rescue the young deer, and apparently it was.

Whether the deer wanted to be rescued was another question. After Storm had pulled the deer out of the water and a representative of a wildlife rescue organization arrived, the deer darted back into the water.

This time it went out even deeper, and the second rescue required two humans and some rope.

floridiaFreeley and Frank Floridia (at left) of Strong Island Rescue took part in phase two of the rescue, roping the deer and hauling it back to shore again.

A veterinarian called to the beach in Port Jefferson transported the deer to his office in his car.

The fawn is expected to make a full recovery before being released into the wild.

Freeley posted his video of Storm in action on Facebook Sunday.

“Storm just plunged into the water and started swimming out to the fawn, grabbed it by the neck, and started swimming to shore,” Freeley told CBS in New York.

“And then he started nudging it, and started paw it to make sure she was gonna be OK I guess,” he added.

The deer was one of two to make the news yesterday. In North Carolina, a deer broke into, of all places, a taxidermy shop in Walnut Cove. The deer crashed through the front door of the shop, which was closed for the night. There was some speculation that it went into the shop after seeing other deer — or at least their heads mounted on walls — inside.

(Video courtesy of Mark Freeley, photo of Frank Floridia supplied by Floridia, via New York Daily News)

Making air travel a lot more tolerable — at least for animals

stables

Imagine a brand new airport terminal that features a swimming pool, private suites with flat screen TV’s, around the clock medical care and a spa with massage services.

Sorry, it’s not for you. It’s for dogs, and other animals.

The $65 million terminal at New York’s Kennedy Airport is scheduled to open later this month, a 178,000-square-foot facility called the ARK that will help process animals arriving and departing on international flights — dogs, cats, birds, horses and even cattle.

That’s right, cattle could soon be receiving far more luxurious travel services while we humans continue to be treated more and more like cattle when we choose to travel by air.

The facility will hold newly arriving animals from outside the country, and those being quarantined and, for those in need of additional services, the premises will include a pet resort, veterinarians and groomers.

poolThe ARK sits on 14.5 acres of land in a cargo area near the runways. It replaces Vetport, a facility that opened in 1951 and had a less than pristine reputation.

The new facility is billed by developer Racebrook Capital as the “world’s only privately owned animal terminal and USDA-approved, full-service, 24-hour, airport quarantine facility for import and export of horses, pets, birds and livestock.”

Company owner John Cuticelli says he expects about 5,000 horses, 10,000 small pets like dogs and cats, and hundreds of thousands of birds to come through the facility each year.

The company has signed a 30-year lease with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, according to the New York Post, which was recently given a tour of the new facility.

The Ark features a large animal departure lounge offering stalls, food and water for horses, individual climate-controlled units for horses, equipped with bedding and natural light, a veterinary hospital offering general and emergency care, a Paradise 4 Paws pet resort featuring a bone-shaped dog pool and a jungle gym for cats, and grooming, training and massage therapy.

“Right now, animals can wait four or five hours on the tarmac or in the cargo facility because there is no other way to process them,” Cuticelli said. “The ARK will be focused on the safe and humane transportation of animals.”

New York to look at regulating dog trainers

nydogworks

Spurred on by a viral video of a Long Island dog trainer viciously poking a crated pit bull with a broomstick, two New York legislators are calling for state regulation of dog trainers.

On Monday, Sen. Todd Kaminsky, Assemblywoman-elect Missy Miller and members of the Nassau County SPCA proposed a law that will require a license for dog obedience trainers.

The proposed legislation was announced at the home of Tommy Marrone, the Oceanside man who posted the video online.

(The video was removed from YouTube yesterday for violating its policy against “violent or graphic content.”)

“I am horrified by the animal abuse that has taken place in our backyard,” Kaminsky said. “… What happened in Oceanside can happen anywhere, and it is our job to protect consumers and their dogs from devious and abusive practices.

“When consumers send their pets to training school, they have no assurance of the trainer’s credentials or professional experience – and that’s simply unacceptable,” he added. “By creating streamlined licensing practices for dog obedience trainers, we are protecting our four-legged family members who cannot speak and shield themselves from abuse.”

The proposed legislation will deny licensing to any individual convicted of animal abuse and allows for enforcement of violations by police officers and professionals who specialize in detecting animal abuse, such as the SPCA.

“I treat my pets as members of my family. We simply cannot allow another animal to be abused and have a duty to protect innocent consumers,” said Assemblywoman-elect Miller, who intends to sponsor this legislation in the Assembly.

The call for regulation is in response to the furor created by the video of a man abusing a pit bull, according to LongIsland.com.

The man in the video is reported to be Brian De Martino, the owner of NY Dogworks. DeMartino runs the business out of his home.

The video was recorded by De Martino’s girlfriend, and was originally made public by Marrone, a former NY Dogworks customer.

“My dog was beat worse than that dog,” Marrone told PIX11 News. Marrone said that he’d posted the video online in an attempt to warn others.

On Monday afternoon, Nassau County police and building inspectors visited DeMartino’s home — just hours after DeMartino appeared in court on charges of assaulting the woman who recorded the video.

PIX11 News reports that De Martino is being investigated for illegal use of his home, operating without a permit, and possible animal abuse charges.

After flunking out as a service dog, a black Lab named Dagger turns to an art career

Having a gallery opening and appearing on the “The Rachael Ray Show” show in the same week would be quite the accomplishment for any artist.

But this one has only been painting a year.

And he has no hands.

Dagger II burst onto the art scene in March, when Newsday published a story about the paint brush- wielding, three-year-old black Labrador.

dogvinciYesterday, in light of his growing fame, there was a follow-up story in Newsday recounting his recent achievements.

Dagger II and his human, artist Yvonne Dagger, met Rachael Ray last month and demonstrated the dog’s skills. Dagger II, wearing his trademark red beret, was said to have hit it off especially well with Ray’s co-host for the day, Regis Philbin. The episode airs Friday.

Friday also marks the gallery debut of Dagger II — also known as DogVinci. His works will be on display at Long Island Picture Frame and Art Gallery in Massapequa Park.

Dagger II and his owner have partnered with that business to sell both original works and limited edition prints of his creations.

Ten percent of proceeds will go to Forgotten Friends of Long Island, a Plainview-based animal rescue and rehabilitation group.

Yvonne Dagger adopted Dagger II after he flunked out of service dog training. It was discovered he had a fear of going up and down stairs.

After laying at her feet as she painted, he attempted his own foray into the art world.

sunny-day-1-lLast Summer, Yvonne Dagger said, the dog who had always quietly watched as she painted began nudging her. She asked him if he wanted to paint and he began wagging his tail. She set up an easel for him, made a brush handle out of a paper towel tube and duct tape, and taught him some commands.

Yvonne helps him load the brush with non-toxic paints.

“Brush,” she tells Dagger to get him to take the makeshift brush in his mouth. “Paint,” she says to get him to apply brush to canvas.

His original paintings are selling for up to $325.

You can learn more about Dagger II, and view more of his works, at his website, DogVinci.com.

(Photos: DogVinci.com)

Dog saves woman, woman saves dog

A pit bull saved a woman from a fire in a Long Island home Friday, barking to alert her as flames began to engulf the house.

Then the woman returned the favor.

Jackie Bonasera said she was drying her hair in an upstairs bathroom of a home in East Norwich when she heard the dog barking. She ran downstairs and saw the flames on the side of her garage, according to NBC Channel 4 in New York

She ran out of the house, but then returned to save her dog, a pit bull named Cain.

“I’m like, ‘He saved my life, I have to save his,'” Bonasera said.

“So I just put my robe over my face and I ran back in and I grabbed the dog and then I stood out here and I watched my house burn,” she said.

Bonasera believes she would have been trapped upstairs if the dog, named Cain, hadn’t alerted her to the fire. Her daughter, Alexus Stallworth, called Cain  “the town hero.”

More than 70 firefighters fought the fire, the cause of which hasn’t been determined.

 

Sound reasoning: What would Charley think?

With a deep bass toot, the ferry to Connecticut began churning across Long Island Sound. I leaned over the railing and, as the water rushed by, felt a deep sense of accomplishment — for the ground we’ve already covered and that which we will be covering in the second phase of our trip.

Ace not being around — he was inside the car in the ferry’s gut — I gave myself, figuratively, of course, a pat on the back. This was a good idea — my highly original plan to copy (more or less) John Steinbeck’s trip. Others have retraced the route, and written about it, but I had the foresight to be starting off exactly 50 years to the day after Steinbeck did.

I had just settled on a bench, and had stopped patting myself, when Bill Steigerwald walked by, camera around his neck, notepad at his side, taking it all in and looking at passengers that way reporters look at people — like they are cuts of meat that might be worth tasting — as he pursued his highly original plan … to copy John Steinbeck’s trip.

So we sat and talked, comparing notes about our highly original plans to copy John Steinbeck’s trip. We decided, I think, that we liked each other, and concluded that though our goals our similar — a book, somewhere down the road — we weren’t barking up, or peeing on, the same tree.

Steigerwald, like me, was a career newspaper guy. We both accepted buyout offers from our newspapers — he in 2009, from the Pittsburgh Tribune Review, me in 2008 from the Baltimore Sun — in hopes that, if we continued our writerly ways, we might survive in 21st Century America without having to become fast food cooks, Wal-Mart greeters, or strip club flaks. And both of us are now self-subsidizing our travels in hopes that some day, in some way, somebody might want to buy what we want to write.

We are both brilliant, in a stupid kind of way; or maybe we’re stupid, in a brilliant kind of way.

Steigerwald, who is traveling doglessly, is reporting on his trip — which will be a more precise retracing of Steinbeck’s route than mine — for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, where he also once worked. He, like me, is blogging about it daily.

Bill is 62, five years older than me, but I think we’re both among a large group of once-and-maybe-still-somewhat-idealistic baby boomer former reporters who jumped ship amid the industry’s downward spiral. Now we’re seeking a flotation device. In my case, at least, I’ve continued doing what I’ve always done — write stories — even though I’m not paid (other than by my fine advertisers) for it. I wonder if people who have left other careers do that — keep plying their trade even though the salary and benefits have stopped.  To some extent, I think yes. One’s job gets in one’s blood. So retired lawyers probably keep arguing long after their last case closed. Former politicians probably continue to lie. TV weather reporters likely continue to make erroneous forecasts.

Possibly the whistling ferry loader in charge of getting cars aboard the boat yesterday will keep whistling, waving his arms, complaining about “f***in’ management” and saying things like, “Give me a couple of minutes, I’ll wave youse up,” for at least several months after he starts drawing a pension.

With writers, though, I think that runs even deeper — either because we see it as somehow noble, or because we don’t know how do do anything else. Like dogs, we tend to keep following and sniffing along the trail we are on. It’s not a totally mindless pursuit. We do what we know how to do. We know there might be something good ahead.

Not knowing, either, how to board a ferry, I just followed the shouted orders yesterday. I didn’t get a ticket in advance, so I paid $61 for my sound crossing; Bill, clearly a better planner than me, paid $49.

I took him down to the bowels of the ferry, and we compared vehicles. He has a red sport utility much like the one I’m in, but his backseat — because he’s not toting a dog — is open, with a large mattress he can sleep on. I showed him my dog, then took Ace up on the deck, which I had assumed wasn’t allowed, but actually was.

Bill fell for Ace, but, as he wrote today, was kind of glad — after seeing how much space my dog took up in my vehicle — that he didn’t have a dog along.

We parted ways — both intent on continuing our highly original plans to copy John Steinbeck’s trip — agreeing to try to meet up again in Maine or Michigan or Montana. As he plans to complete his trip in six weeks, I’ll probably be lagging behind, though.

As I waited my turn to pull off the ferry, I wondered what Charley — now buried behind John Steinbeck’s house in Sag Harbor — would make of it all: all these literary/scholarly/newspaper/blogging types who, over the years, have seen fit to repeat the trek that he made with his master.

Silly humans, he might think, following their so-called instincts, which aren’t very good in the first place.

My guess is he would get a good doggie chuckle out of it all. He’d probably break into a poodle smile.

“Ftt,” he’d say.

Steinbeck home is source of discontent

 

Novels need conflict. Houses don’t. But the former Long Island home of John Steinbeck is smack in the middle of one that branches out in nearly as many directions as the mighty oaks in his former front yard.

It’s a modest two-bedroom bungalow, scenically set amid gigantic oak trees, on two acres that jut into Noyac Bay in the town of Sag Harbor — the house where Steinbeck wrote “Travels with Charley,” the house behind which Charley is buried, and the one we left from yesterday to retrace, at least in part, the route of the author and his poodle.

The house is also part of a long battle over the Steinbeck family estate. Jean Boone, the sister of the author’s third and final wife, Elaine, says it is hers. Thomas Steinbeck, John’s oldest son, disputes that.

“The house belongs to Steinbeck’s blood heirs,” Thomas Steinbeck, 65, told the New York Times.

The two parties have different ideas about what the house should become. Boone is against preserving the home as a historic site or museum because her family enjoys vacationing there. Thomas would like to see it become a school for writers.

Mrs. Boone, 81, says her sister Elaine left it to her upon her death in 2003, and that she plans to leave it to her family.

In 2004, though, Thomas Steinbeck and his niece sued the family of Elaine Steinbeck. The suit alleges a “30-year conspiracy” to cheat Steinbeck blood heirs out of royalties and copyright control, according to the Times article. The suit was dismissed in 2009, but Thomas Steinbeck appealed, and arguments will be held next month in Manhattan.

The appeal is mainly over the rights to John Steinbeck’s books, and, in it, Thomas Steinbeck does not lay claim to the Sag Harbor property, where John Steinbeck found the same salty-sea-air inspiration he did in Monterey, California.

Times reporter Corey Kilgannon received a tour of the property earlier this week, and noted many reminders of Steinbeck are still there, including marks on the wall of the kitchen where the author recorded the height of family and guests, including Charley. Steinbeck’s books and other belongings were removed from the shack in recent years, but other signs remain, including one over the doorway that says “Aroynte,” which the Times article says may be derived from an old English term meaning “Be gone!”

Other Steinbeck scribblings are on the walls and tool drawers, one of which reads, “Knives, Chisels and Bladey Things.” A miniature steel cannon Steinbeck used to scare the geese away remains in the living room, and the walls are still lined with photographs of Steinbeck.

Steinbeck set off from the house 50 years ago yesterday on his 10,000 mile trip with Charley in a camper named “Rocinante,” after Don Quixote’s horse. He returned 11 weeks later and wrote the book there.

“Elaine used to say that John enjoyed having no distractions,” the property’s caretaker, John Stefanik, told the Times. “The words just flowed out here.”