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Tag: milos kitchen

Milo’s Kitchen recalls two dog treats

milosThe J.M. Smucker Company has recalled two different kinds of Milo’s Kitchen dog treats.

According to the Milo’s Kitchen website, shipments of Milo’s Kitchen Steak Grillers / Steak Grillers Recipe with Angus Steak and Milo’s Kitchen Grilled Burger Bites with Sweet Potato and Bacon are being recalled over concerns of potentially elevated levels of a beef thyroid hormone.

The FDA says three dogs are known to have been sickened by the treats.

Dogs who have consumed high levels of beef thyroid hormone may show symptoms of increased thirst and urination, weight loss, increased heart rate and restlessness, according to the FDA.

The symptoms should subside once consumption of the treats is discontinued, but prolonged consumption can cause vomiting, diarrhea and labored breathing.

One of the first dog owners to report a problem with the treats was a Seattle area woman, whose Pomeranian-Chihuahua, named Teka, became ill at the end of last year.

“She was barely getting up. She wasn’t running around. Her activity level was low and it clearly looked like she could die that weekend … She would just sit there and drink and drink and drink,” Eide told KING5.

The dog was a gift to Eide’s dying daughter, Karina.

“It was our daughter’s ‘Make A Wish’ dog,” Eide said. “She said, ‘I know some kids want to go to Disneyland for Make a Wish. We’ll have Teka forever’. It was our responsibility to take good care of her,” Fernette said.

Karina passed away in 2014.

When Teka became ill, Eide took the dog to the vet, where abnormally high levels of thyroid hormones were detected.

After she reported the issue to the FDA, she was interviewed and supplied the agency with some of the treats.

The recall includes two flavors of the treats:

Milo’s Kitchen Steak Grillers / Steak Grillers Recipe with Angus Steak:

UPC Code: 0 7910051822 7 Size: 18 oz. bag Best By Date: 11/15/2018
UPC Code: 0 7910051822 7 Size: 18 oz. bag Best By Date: 4/26/2019
UPC Code: 0 7910051823 4 Size: 22 oz. bag Best By Date: 4/26/2019
UPC Code: 0 7910052776 2 Size: 10 oz. bag Best By Date: 4/26/2019

Milo’s Kitchen Grilled Burger Bites with Sweet Potato and Bacon:

UPC Code: 0 7910052126 5 Size: 15 oz. bag Best By Date: 11/19/2018

Petco clears shelves of Chinese jerky treats

jerky

Petco says it has pulled all Chinese-made dog and cat treats from store shelves, fulfilling a promise the chain made to customers last May.

“We know some pet parents are wary of dog and cat treats made in China, especially chicken jerky products, and we’ve heard their concerns,”  Jim Myers, Petco’s chief executive, said Monday — a good seven years after complaints first surfaced about chicken treats made in China sickening and killing dogs.

The FDA has been investigating the treats since 2007, but has yet to yet to establish a definite link to the deaths and sicknesses.

Thousands of pets have fallen ill — hundreds fatally — leading to 5,000 complaints of pet illnesses suspected to have been caused by chicken, duck, and vegetable jerky treats made in China.

Despite  steadily rising concerns, American companies continued to market the treats (under the names Waggin’ Tail and Milo’s Kitchen, among others), and the country’s largest pets stores, including Petco and PetSmart,  continued to sell them.

Petco,which has not sold China-made dog and cat foods for several years, announced last May that it would clear store shelves of the jerky treats. (We’re still not clear on why doing so would take seven months.)

PetSmart, which, like Petco, operates more than 1,300 stores nationally, has pledged to remove all Chinese-made pet treats from its stores by spring, according to the Washington Post.

Nestle Purina and Del Monte, which own the brands such Waggin’ Tail and Milo’s Kitchen, stopped selling chicken jerky dog treats made in China back in 2012, calling the shift precautionary.

The Petco announcement  applies only to treats made with jerky and rawhide, according to Lily Gluzberg, a spokesperson for the company.

The FDA has been unable to tie the illnesses specifically to Chinese-made pet foods, despite testing more than a thousand samples and  inspecting factories in China. But it continues to investigate.

PetSmart and Petco to pull China-made jerky treats off their shelves — finally

Chinesjerky

After thousands of reported illnesses and 1,000 dog deaths, PetSmart and Petco have announced they will stop selling all dog and cat treats made in China.

What took the retailers so long to reach the decision, and why it will take them seven to ten months more to purge store shelves of such items, remain questions worth asking.

So too is why the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which has been investigating the treats for years — without determining what about them is making dogs sick — can’t tell us much more than “CAUTION,” with an exclamation point.

PetSmart said it will pull from the shelves all of the China-made treat it sells by March 2015.

Petco said it will accomplish that by the end of this year.

Both retailers have about 1,300 stores nationwide.

The two national pet retailers’ decisions came after seven years of complaints to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration about jerky treats from China making pets sick, or worse.

“We know some pet parents are wary of dog and cat treats made in China, especially chicken jerky products, and we’ve heard their concerns,” said Jim Myers, Petco CEO, in a statement.

A PetSmart spokesperson, meanwhile, told USA Today it has been working toward this goal “for some time, and feel it’s the right thing to do for pets and our customers.”

Taking questionable Chinese-made treats off the shelves strikes us as a pretty simple task, as opposed to “a goal to work toward.” You just pick them up and put them in the garbage. And while “hearing customer concerns” is commendable, it shouldn’t take three or four years for them to sink in.

The move comes as sales of Chinese made jerky treats diminish, amid increasing public concerns about them.

Five years ago, 90% of the pet industry’s jerky treats were made in China, said Lisa Stark, spokeswoman for Petco. Currently, about 50% of the jerky treats sold by Petco are from China.

Since 2007, the FDA says it has received about 4,800 reports of pet illnesses, and 1,000 dog deaths, possibly related to the consumption of jerky treats. The FDA, while issuing warnings, says it has yet to establish any direct link between the pet illnesses and the China-made treats.

Most of the complaints involved chicken jerky, but others included duck, sweet potato and chicken, according to the FDA.