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Tag: monmouth county

Crated dog was placed in bay to get revenge on rival boyfriend, prosecutors say

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The man charged with leaving a pit bull mix in a cage to drown in the Sandy Hook Bay was trying to get revenge on a romantic rival, prosecutors say.

Aaron Davis, 34, is being held without bail pending trial on third-degree charges of animal cruelty and disorderly persons charges.

A judge in Monmouth County Courthouse Monday sided with the state in its bid to deny bail and keep Davis behind bars until he is tried in the case, the Asbury Park Press reported.

The dog was discovered and rescued before the tide came in July 30 by a woman who had been walking her own dog at Veterans Memorial Park in Highlands, N.J.

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During a hearing Monday in Superior Court in Freehold Borough, prosecutors revealed that the dog — actually named Blaze — belonged to the ex-boyfriend of Davis’ girlfriend. The woman has children by both men.

The prosecutor said that the ex-boyfriend, Benito Williams, tried to break into the woman’s home but Davis stopped him and a fight ensued. Davis acted with “malice and depravity” to eliminate an “emblem of his enemy,” a prosecutor said.

Davis’ attorney, Adamo Ferreira of Hackensack, argued that the charges would likely result in probation in the event of a conviction and that the state’s case was “paper thin.”

Jennifer Vaz, who rescued the dog and named him River, has been fostering the dog.

She had planned to adopt him, but announced this week that she would be turning the dog over to the Monmouth County SPCA because her own dog has not taken well to the new dog.

Ross Licitra, executive director of the Monmouth County SPCA, said the dog will not be returned to the original owner.

(Photos: Asbury Park Press)

She plans to adopt dog she saved from bay

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The New Jersey woman who rescued a 1-year-old pit bull from drowning in a crate is planning to adopt the dog.

Jennifer Vaz was walking her dog Molly to see the sunrise at Sandy Hook Bay when she heard a dog’s whimpers coming from the waterside of the rock bulkhead.

“Molly was noticing something and wanted to take me off the trail,” she told CBS News. “When I looked down in the water, I saw River and I saw his little black eyes looking back at me.”

The dog was in a black wire crate, and the tide was coming in.

Vaz climbed over the wall to save the dog, now named River.

Her own dog followed.

“Molly actually followed me and assisted me,” Vaz said. “She went into the crate and licked him and he followed her.”

Officials said the cage was on a small portion of land between the bulkhead and water – and at the time of the rescue around 6:15 a.m., water had already reached the cage.

River was taken to the Highlands Police Department, which notified animal control. When animal control team arrived at the bayfront scene a few hours later, the cage was almost covered by the rising tide.

In a Facebook post, the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office announced it was seeking help in finding the person responsible for leaving the dog in black wire cage in Veterans Memorial Park.

Anyone with information about River is asked to call the Animal Cruelty Hot Line at 877-898-7297 or Highlands police at 732-872-1224.

The Monmouth County SPCA says River is in good condition.

Once she is cleared for adoption, Vaz hopes to adopt her. Meanwhile, she will foster her.

“It just feels like the right thing to do,” said Vaz, who picked him up Wednesday. “He feels like he’s part of our family.”

Crated pit bull rescued after being left to perish in rising bay tides

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New Jersey prosecutors are asking for the public’s help in tracking down the demented human who left a young dog inside a wire crate that was being swallowed by the rising tide.

A dog walker spotted the crate and the dog inside along the rocks Monday morning at Veterans Memorial Park, a bayfront park in Highlands.

waterdogShe rescued the young pit bull herself before authorities arrived at the scene, the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office said in a Facebook post.

The office said the woman was walking a dog when she spotted “a small dog cowering inside the cage. The cage was on a small portion of sand between the bulkhead and the water. The tide was coming in and the water had reached the cage.

“The good Samaritan climbed over the wall and rescued the dog … If not for the heroic rescue act of the good Samaritan, the dog could have potentially drowned.”

The dog had no collar or tags, and the ones he’s wearing in the photo at top were placed there by his rescuer, according to a comment on the post left by that person.

waterdog3Authorities asked for the public’s help in identifying who left the dog there.

Investigators said that based on the tide schedule, the caged dog was likely placed near the water between 4 and 6 a.m.

Anyone with information about the incident may contact the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office Animal Cruelty Hot Line 877-898-7297 or the Highlands Police at (732) 872-1224.

The grey and white dog was taken to the Highlands Police Department. There was no update on the dog’s condition Monday night.

(Photos: Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office Facebook page)

Dumped down trash chute, Patrick survives

Patrick the pit bull — a dog who was starved, placed in a garbage bag and tossed down the trash chute of a 22-floor apartment building in Newark — continues to slowly recover.

And considering the condition he was found in — by a maintenance worker who noticed a soon-to be-compacted plastic bag moving — that’s pretty close to miraculous.

According to Associated Humane Societies, Patrick, as he was later named, was living — and just barely — somewhere in the Garden Spires apartment building, which is equipped with garbage chutes on each floor.

“Someone had no more use for this dog. They had starved it to near death, put it in a garbage bag and threw it down the garbage chute,” AHS reports on its website.

Normally, the contents of the bin at the bottom of the building are sent directly into a trash compacter, but on Wednesday, March 16th, a maintenance worker noticed a bag moving, opened it and found the dog inside — about one year old, pathetically thin and on death’s doorstep.

“His eyelids were moving a little. But he was just lifeless — his body hung there when we picked him up,” Monmouth County animal control officer Arthur Skinner said.

Skinner took the dog to Associated Humane Societies Newark Animal Care Center, and he was sent from there Garden State Veterinary Specialists in Tinton Falls,  veterinarians and technicians have been giving him transfusions of blood, feeding him intravenously and warming him with heated blankets.

By Monday, Patrick, who was named by hospital staff on St. Patrick’s Day, was able to sit up and walk. He’s now off IV fluids and eating canned dog food.

Patrick — and we’ll warn you now that the picture below, taken shortly after he was discovered, is highly disturbing — is slowly becoming more than skin and bones. He spends most of his time in his cage, napping next to stuffed animals donated by the hospital’s staff. He doesn’t bark or wag his tail, but lifts his head whenever someone passes by, accordingn to the Star-Ledger in Newark.

Officials from the Monmouth County Humane Society have offered a $2,000 reward for information leading to the dog’s abuser.

The Associated Humane Societies reported this week that Patrick is now able to stand, eats little bits of food several times a day and is having normal bowel movements. The organization is accepting donations towards his continued care. You can find AHS updates on Patrick here.

Program pairs trainers with problem dogs

Behavior problems are the main reason dogs end up in shelters, the main reason they get returned, and the main reason that some of them never get out.

So it only makes sense that helping dogs and the families that adopt them resolve those issues would lead to far more happier endings and far fewer dogs being put down.

Realizing that, Best Friends Animal Society in Utah has developed a new program in conjunction with the Monmouth County SPCA that matches dog trainers with shelters and families whose dogs have behavioral issues.

Sam Wike, the first trainer accepted into the program, is shown in this video working with Rufus, one of the first dogs referred by Best Friends’ Community Training Partner program. Wike is the lead trainer at Purr’n Pooch, a pet boarding/training/grooming facility in New Jersey.

Rufus, who was in the Monmouth County SPCA, needed a “finishing school” environment in order to be ready to be adopted, Best Friends says. Now he’s completed the training and is ready for adoption.

The main goal of the program is to lower the number of dogs returned to shelters and to counsel people considering relinquishing their dogs because of behavior issues.

When a family comes into the shelter to turn in their dog, a staff counselor sits down with them, and talks through the reasons the family is considering giving up their pet. Owners then are offered the option of training and behavior modification for their dogs, which is funded through the Best Friends program.

“We started this January working with the staff and we’ve also initiated doggy play groups with the shelter dogs,” Wike said. “The play groups help the dogs to learn how to interact appropriately with other dogs. The dogs burn off excess energy romping with each other and it’s a great showcase for their personalities when potential adopters come by the shelter,” Wike said.

Woman charged with slitting throat of dog

A Pennsylvania woman was charged with animal cruelty and a weapons offense after she slit a dog’s throat Sunday night during an argument with her fiancé at his family’s home in Union Beach, N.J., authorities said.

Michele Milford, 35, of Scranton, was being held in the Monmouth County jail in Freehold in lieu of $10,000 bail, according to the Newark Star-Ledger.

Victor “Buddy’’ Amato, chief animal cruelty officer for the Monmouth County SPCA, said Milford and her fiancé argued during a party. During the dispute, she went into a laundry room and slit the throat of the family’s dog — twice.

While waiting for authorities, partygoers tried to slow the bleeding by pressing T-shirts and other items of clothing to the neck of the dog, a two-year-old Jack Russell terrier named Penelope.

The dog was rushed to the Red Bank Animal Hospital where she was scheduled to undergo surgery today.

Amato said Milford used a push knife, a two-inch blade with a T-handle designed to be grasped in a fist so the arrow-like blade protrudes from between the knuckles.

Amato said he did not know the reason for the argument, but it apparently had nothing to do with the dog.

The charges against Milford are fourth-degree offenses. The animal cruelty charge would be upgraded to a third-degree offense, punishable by a possible jail sentence, if the dog dies from her injuries, Amato said.

N.J. man gets jail for booby trapping fence

A New Jersey man who admitted driving nails through a fence in hopes of injuring his neighbor’s dogs has been sentenced to 15 days in jail.

David Lench, 50, of Middletown also was ordered to pay $4,000 in fines when sentenced Wednesday by Middletown Municipal Court Judge Richard Thompson. He had pleaded guilty to three counts of animal cruelty.

Officials say Lench drove 18 3-inch nails through the a wooden fence separating his yard from Michael Flynn’s, which led one of Flynn’s three German shepherds to suffer puncture wounds to its face.

Neither Lench nor his lawyer, Michael V. Gilberti of Red Bank, could be reached for comment Wednesday, according to an Associated Press report.