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Tag: neutered

The Neuticles story: How fake dog testicles made this Missouri man a millionaire

netuclesleashes1

Just in case you didn’t get enough of dog testicles yesterday, today we bring you the story of a man who built an empire atop them — specifically, silicone prosthetic implants than can make a neutered dog feel “whole again.”

Neuticles are nothing new.

Gregg Miller came up with idea well nearly two decades ago, persuaded a veterinarian to join him in the venture, and the rest is history.

For those interested in delving into that history, the book is entitled “Going…Going…Nuts.”

CNBC reported this week on how Miller’s idea — thought insane by most — became, after more than a few ups and downs, a viable business

In the mid-90’s, Miller’s bloodhound, Buck, ran away from home — apparently after the unneutered hound picked up the scent of a female dog in heat. He was found four days later a few miles away.

buckleashes1That’s when Miller said he realized he needed to neuter Buck, or “this is going to happen again.'”

Even before the surgery, Miller says he asked his veterinarian if anyone made implants for neutered dog. The vet told him that was “the craziest damn thing I’ve ever heard of.”

Miller said he wanted Buck to “maintain his God-given natural look.”

After the surgery, he said, Buck would would give him looks. “He was telling me, ‘They’re gone. What happened?'”

Miller eventually sold his veterinarian on the idea and they lined up 32 local investors who spent over $100,000 to develop Neuticles.

The veterinarian tested the first prototypes on 30 different pets without any problems, and the first commercially implanted Neuticles went into a dog in 1995.

Was that a proud day for his parents? Not exactly. “My parents, who were alive back then, thought I was absolutely crazy,” Miller says. “Everybody that I knew thought that was the sickest thing you could possible think of.”

Still, the product received lots of media attention, early on. It soon wore off, and Miller found himself strapped for cash.

Miller invested more, though, and began advertising in dog magazines.

“He did radio interviews around the country and offered free Neuticles to listeners. He built up a network of veterinarians, and business finally boomed,” CNBC reported.

Another problem came when customers started complaining their Neuticles-equipped dogs made a “clacking” sound when they walked.

Miller switched to making them from silicone instead of hard plastic, and that took care of that.

51P56DVC14L._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_Neuticles now come in 11 different sizes to fit a variety of pets, costing as much as $469 a pair, and Miller has expanded his product line to include eye implants for animals, stays for holding up cropped ears and allergy products for sensitive pet skin.

He’s a millionaire now, living outside Independence, Missouri, in what he likes to call “The House that Neuticles Built.” He likes to drive his new Mercedes down I-70 and look at one of the six billboards across the country advertising Neuticles.

Buck has since died, and Miller now has a bulldog named Humphrey, neutered and equipped with Neuticles.

He showed off his estate for the CNBC (see video here), and dished a little too, noting that his celebrity clients include the Kardashians, who — it should come as no surprise — bought a pair a few years ago for their dog Rocky. They chose the earlier hard plastic version that make noise.

After a pit bull named Trump gets neutered, his owner doesn’t want him anymore

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A Brooklyn man surrendered his pit bull mix — not because the shelter renamed the dog Trump, but because animal control wouldn’t return the dog without neutering him first.

Peter Gorgenyi said his 95-pound pit bull mix — who went by the name Rocco — ran off and was picked up by animal control two weeks ago. At the shelter, staff gave him the name Trump.

After learning the dog was in the city’s care, Gorgenyi was contacted by animal control on April 20 and informed that, under city law, the dog had to be neutered before he could be returned.

roccoTo Gorgenyi, 38, that was unacceptable. His life plan involved moving to a wilderness area in Montana, where he expected the dog — in his intact condition — to bravely fend off bear attacks and other threats.

“He had to be a masculine, strong dog, not a confused neutered dog,” Gorgenyi told the New York Post. “Neutering changes a dog’s behavior.”

Gorgenyi, a software engineer who we’re guessing is a pretty macho guy, filed a lawsuit in Manhattan Supreme Court to stop the procedure, but by then it was too late. Trump was neutered Monday.

He has since informed animal control that he doesn’t want the 3-year-old dog back.

Gorgenyi says he rescued the dog last year from an abusive owner.

The Post story quotes Gorgenyi as saying animal control bestowed his dog with the name Trump, but apparently he offered no thoughts on that. Gorgenyi does have multiple photos of President Trump on his Facebook page, the article says.

There was no comment on the case from representatives for Animal Care and Control, the Post said.

(Photos: Provided by owner to New York Post)

Sparring for sperm: Legal fight stems from neutering of a champion bichon frisé

beauWhen a  bichon frisé named Beau Lemon retired from the dog show circuit as the second best of his breed, plans were for him to spend his leisure years raking in the stud fees.

At age 3, his owners in Minnesota figured Beau — full name Victoire Gerie’s No Lemon Gemstone — could breed at least until he was 10.

In the process, they figured, they would be ensuring his genes and his legacy lived on .

And they’d get the puppy that they desperately wanted.

But those hopes, and those bucks, seemingly became a thing of the past when Beau’s breeder had the little white dog neutered without their knowledge, owners Mary and John Wangsness allege in a lawsuit.

The legal dispute has been going on for about a year now in Minnesota’s Ramsey County, according to the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

The Wangsnesses allege breeder Vickie Halstead, who sold them the dog, acted in “vengeance” by neutering Beau because they had tried to breed him twice to a female dog, Cha Cha, without obtaining Halstead’s approval, which  was required in the sales contract.

They are seeking more than $50,000 in damages, and about eight vials of what they believe to be Beau’s frozen semen, now stored in a veterinary clinic and estimated to be worth $3,000 each.

The semen is being held under Halstead’s name, and the lawsuit alleges she has already profited from selling two vials.

As John Wangsness sees it, since it came from the loins of his dog, what’s in those vials are his.

“Damn right, they’re mine,” he said.

Beau was neutered without their approval in July 2013, when he was 4.

“After hearing about the neutering, and I’m not overstating things at all, Mary literally cried and stayed in bed for three weeks,”  said Wangsness, adding that she never fully recovered before she died this past March.

The case isn’t as black and white as it might seen.  In the competitive world of dog showing, ownership of a dog — as well as decisions about its care and profits — are often contractually shared between the breeder and the owner.

And that much debated sperm might not even be Beau Lemon’s.

Halstead’s attorney, Joseph Crosby, said at a recent hearing that the frozen semen belongs to Beau’s brother, Beau Jangles.

Crosby said Halstead “rescued” the dog from the Wangsnesses because they were neglecting him. He said Beau was suffering from dental disease, a low sperm count, impacted anal glands, and a matted and unhealthy coat.

Crosby said Beau’s neutering was necessary due to his “deteriorated health condition.”

In June of 2013, Halstead borrowed Beau from the Wangsnesses for what she told them was breeding purposes, the lawsuit says.

They did not learn of his neutering until he was returned.

Larry Leventhal, attorney for the Wangsnesses, said the couple treated Beau as a pet, but they also expected to have the option of breeding him several times a year at a rate of $2,000 to $3,000 per breeding until he turned 10.

Wangsness said that, more than money, he wants justice for his wife.

“I would like some vindication for the emotional distress that happened to Mary as a result of [Beau’s neutering],” Wangsness said.

Attorneys were scheduled to meet Tuesday to discuss a settlement agreement.

(Photo: Beau, as pictured on the website for Victoir’s Bichons)

Owners say their prize-winning Samoyed was neutered without their permission

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Justin is a stud no more, and the handsome Samoyed’s New York owners are suing his temporary caretaker for having him neutered without their permission, and refusing to give him back.

Cecile and Victor Stanton, of Jericho, N.Y., filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles last week against Beverly Jeffries of Pasadena, Calif., claiming she refuses to return their dog, whose official American Kennel Club name is Polar Mist You Gotta Believe.

The Stantons agreed to give temporary custody of the AKC-registered Grand Champion to Jeffries while they retained ownership, according to a contract signed in February and included in the lawsuit.

But, according to the lawsuit, when the Stantons asked for the dog to be returned in May, Jeffries refused, ABC News reports

In the lawsuit, the Stantons say Jeffries had Justin neutered without their permission in April.

The dog is worth an estimated $250,000, according to the suit — and his breeding value alone was worth $100,000.

The Stantons bought the dog in 2006, according to a certificate issued by the American Kennel Club.

The Stantons are suing Jeffries for $350,000, citing breach of contract, promissory fraud, and intentional infliction of severe emotional distress.

Neither Jeffries nor the Stantons could be reached by ABC for comment.

(Photo by Ken O’Brien, O’Brien Photos, via Infodog)

Patrick’s gets surgery; hair mass removed

Patrick, the dog found starved nearly to death after he was dumped down a high-rise apartment building’s trash chute in Newark, now weighs in at more than 35 pounds. 

And that’s without the petrified hairball that was surgically removed from his stomach this week. 

Dr. Jason Pintar, an internist at Garden State Veterinary Specialists, removed the long flat hair mass from Patrick’s stomach using a video endoscopic procedure while Patrick was under anesthesia. 

Hair mass removed from Patrick

 After the hair mass was removed, Patrick was transferred to another surgery suite for neutering, Associated Humane Societies in New Jersey reportsAfter surgery, he’ll still need treatment for mange, and physical therapy for weak rear legs, AHS says. 

The non-profit organization says it’s receiving thousands of emails a day — and that it has been contacted by several people who say Patrick was their dog. Some say he ran away, some say he was stolen, and one told AHS they’d contacted an attorney. 

Also casting a cloud over Patrick’s story is the emergence of people hoping to profit off his name and image. 

The number of Internet sites related to him — some well-intentioned, some not — has steadily grown, and some are selling “Patrick” items such as t-shirts, keychains and posters, and using his story to “solicit funds for their own use,” AHS says. 

(Photos: Courtesy of Associated Humane Societies and Popcorn Park Zoo)

Amid family’s sorrows, lost dog is found

20091211_inq_ptuti11-aIt has been a rough few weeks for Wilma Berrios and Tuti.

Three days after Berrios’ uncle died while waiting for treatment in a Philadelphia hospital emergency room, her dog, a 3-year-old male miniature pinscher, wearing a Los Angeles Dodgers hoodie, ran away, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported

In between spending time with her family to mourn her uncle, Berrios walked her neighborhood streets, sometimes in the early hours, posting and handing out fliers with Tuti’s picture — for nearly two weeks.

Eventually, both a letter carrier and a  police officer phoned Berrios with sightings of Tuti, and in tracking down those leads, she learned that Tuti had been picked up and taken to the SPCA animal shelter in Hunting Park.

When she arrived there, though, Tuti was gone. It turns out he’d been picked up by a rescue organization,  N.J. Aid for Animals in Sicklerville, and taken to New Jersey to be put up for adoption.

The SPCA contacted the rescue group and on Thursday Berrios and Tuti — still wearing his hoodie, but minus a couple of appendages — were reunited. The rescue group neuters all animals for which it seeks homes. Neither Berrios nor Tuti seemed to mind, the Inquirer reported. 

“I’m overwhelmed,” Berrios said.  “I’m so happy. There are no words in the dictionary to express how I’m feeling. I didn’t think I would get him, but there’s a God up there.” 

Berrios’ uncle, Joaquin Rivera, was a Philadelphia musician and community activist. He went to Aria Health – Frankford Campus for treatment of chest pains, was robbed of his watch while he sat in the waiting room and died while waiting, which hospital staff reportedly didn’t notice for an hour.

(Philadelphia Inquirer photo by Akira Suwa)

$13 dog adoptions, for 13 days, at BARCS

barcsdogBaltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS) puts no stock in silly superstitions — not even in the Halloween season.

BARCS is offering $13 adoptions for 13 days as part of a special “Howl-O-Ween” promotion.

Apparently, they decided against the black cat specials (shelters generally frowning on promoting gimmicky impulse adoptions).

But gimmicky alone is OK. So, from Oct. 19 through Oct. 31 the shelter will be doing $13 dog adoptions. Regular adoption procedures will apply. All dogs will be spayed or neutered, de-wormed; and be given rabies, DHLPP and bordatella vaccines. BARCS also provides a flea preventative, a general examination, a food sample, and even a month of free health insurance.

“We’re celebrating Howl-O-Ween, but not with tricks, just treats,” says Jennifer Mead-Brause, executive director at BARCS. “We’ll treat you to a new best friend.”

BARCS is the largest shelter in the Baltimore area, taking in over 12,000 animals each year. BARCS has taken in 3,749 dogs from January 1 through September 30, 2009.

To adopt an animal from BARCS, stop by the shelter on Stockholm Street, (behind M&T Bank Stadium), call 410-396-4695 or visit baltimoreanimalshelter.org. BARCS is open for adoptions Monday through Friday from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m to 4 p.m.

(Photo: Majesty, a two-year-old male, is one of the adoptable dogs now at BARCS)