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Tag: pair

Happy ending turned bad, new one needed

adopted-blue-dozer-ojleashes1

That blind dachshund and his pit bull guide dog we wrote about last week are both back in the Richmond animal shelter after the person who adopted them failed to keep her promise to keep the bonded pair together.

Richmond Animal Care and Control Shelter (RACC) proudly announced last week that the pair — surrendered by an owner who had become homeless — had been adopted together.

But a few days later, the happy story took a turn.

OJ, the blind dachshund, was found separated from his friend, about 100 miles away from where they were adopted in Richmond, WRTV reported.

The pair were originally surrendered when their owner became homeless, according to posts by Richmond Animal Care and Control. A picture of the two animals went viral on social media and they were quickly adopted.

OJ., the elder of the two, relied on Blue Dozer, the pit bull, and they would need to be adopted together, according to the posts.

After releasing the dogs to what they thought was a responsible owner, RACC got a call from the Shenandoah Valley Animal Services Center, reporting that OJ was in their custody after being brought in by someone who claimed to have found him as a stray.

Page Hearn, who runs the rescue group Virginia Paws for Pits in Augusta County, said OJ was found wandering and taken to the shelter, where his microchip was traced back to RACC.

The adopter, Hearn said, declined to take back the blind dog, and declined, at least intitially, to surrender Blue Dozer. Later she agreed to return the pit bull.

In an interview with WWTB, the adopter, identified only as Colleen, said she never intended to keep the dogs separated.

But, she said, OJ bit several people within the first two hours after she brought him home, leading her to ask a friend to temporarily take care of the dachshund.

She said she didn’t know OJ was missing from that friend’s home until the shelter called her.

RACC Director Christie Chipps Peters said in an email that they “are very upset over what has transpired.”

Robin Starr, CEO of Richmond SPCA, noted, “There is no shelter that doesn’t have an adoption not turn out well from time to time because people are not totally predictable.”

(Photo: Blue Dozer and OJ, from RACC Facebook page)

Bonnie & Clyde: A blind dog’s guide dog

bonnieandclydeWhen two stray border collies were taken in by Meadow Green Dog Rescue in England, operators of the shelter gave them names befitting a team — Bonnie and Clyde.

Then they found out just how special a team they are: Clyde, it turns out, is blind, and Bonnie is his unofficial guide dog.

The rescue has no idea where the duo came from, but reports that Bonnie stays  inches from Clyde’s side while guiding him on walks, or to food or water, and lets him rest his head on her haunches whenever he becomes disoriented.

When they are together, Clyde, estimated to be five years old, seems nearly as capable as any dog. But when Bonnie, believed to be two years old, is not at his side, Clyde refuses to move.

The inseparable pair were rescued as strays three weeks ago — found abandoned on a street in the middle of a storm, the Telegraph reported.

Meadow Green Dog Rescue in Loddon, Norfolk,  is trying to find them a new home, but officials there are insisting they be adopted as a team.

“If Clyde’s unsure where he is he will suddenly go behind her and put his face on her back so she can guide him where he is going,” said Cherie Cootes. “He totally relies on her the whole time. When she walks she tends to stop and make sure he’s there – she does look out for him.

“There’s absolutely no option of homing them separately – they have to go as a pair,” she added.

A citizen spotted the two dogs running through the rain in Blundeston, Norfolk. When she opened her car door they jumped right in. The dogs have no identification on their collars, and are not microchipped.

Cherie described the dogs as “typical high-spirited collies” and said they would make ideal pets in a home with a large, secure yard away from busy roads.

Sue Cootes, 59, who runs the rescue center with her daughter Cherie, said it was amazing to watch Bonnie assist Clyde.

 “It’s just instinctive with them to help each other and it’s marvelous to see animals doing this together,” she said. “Without Bonnie, Clyde would be lost. They can’t be separated, we need someone to take them both on.”