OUR BEST FRIENDS

whs-logo

The Sergei Foundation

shelterpet_logo

B-more Dog

aldflogo

Pinups for Pitbulls

philadoptables

TFPF_Logo

Mid Atlantic Pug Rescue

Our Pack, Inc.

Maine Coonhound Rescue

Saving Shelter Pets, Inc.

mabb

LD Logo Color

Tag: parliament

Britain looks at outlawing eating dog

sole_solution_1leashes1

Prime Minister Theresa May is looking into banning the eating of dogs in Britain after reports that the practice could be increasing.

Officials announced the prime minister is looking closely” at outlawing eating dog amid reports that the practice could spread to the UK and across Europe, due to immigration from the Far East.

The prime minister’s spokesman said that even though the commercial trade in dog meat in the UK is illegal, it’s taking a look at legislation being submitted next month in the U.S. to explicity ban killing dogs and eating their meat, The Sun reported.

Legislation calling for a similar ban is expected to be introduced in the U.S. next month.

“Britain is a nation of animal lovers and we continue to have some of the highest animal welfare standards in the world. We wish to maintain that,” the spokesman said.

Neither killing dogs to eat nor consuming their meat is illegal in Britain.

The chair of the All-party Parliamentary Dog Advisory Welfare Group, Lisa Cameron, said the development was “fantastic news … I’m sure the ban will have overwhelming cross party support.”

Dr Cameron says there has been a rise in the consumption of dog meat in the UK, but two animal welfare organisations say that they don’t have evidence for this, BBC reported.

Humane Society International says it has “never come across any evidence to suggest that dog meat is being consumed in the UK”.

The World Dog Alliance says it doesn’t know if there are people in the UK who eat dog meat – but still wants it to be made illegal.

An estimated 30 million dogs a year are slaughtered to be eaten across China, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Korea, Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia.

Foreign Office minister Sir Alan Duncan has also spoken out in favor of a total ban on eating dog meat, calling it a “disgusting habit” and adding, “We should nip it in the bud now.”

The World Dog Alliance (WDA) is set to launch a campaign in the UK for a full ban on any activity relating to the eating of dogs.

The WDA’s Kike Yuen told The Sun: “In the U.S., people who eat dog meat are mainly immigrants from Asia. With three million immigrants from East Asia in the UK, we cannot deny this situation exists here too.

“We also believe legislation against dog meat in the UK would provide us with strength to continue our work in Asia, as the UK could influence other countries to stop dog meat consumption,” Yuen added.

(Photo: Dogs headed to slaughter in China; from World Dog Alliance)

Push to ban dog farms in South Korea continues after the Olympics spotlight fades

1517471886469104leashes1

The Olympics are long over in South Korea, but the push to get the country to ban farms where dogs are bred for human consumption, continues — and with a few positive developments.

A new bill, introduced to the National Assembly earlier this month by Lee Sang-don, a member of the Bareunmirae party, would remove the legal basis for factory-style mass breeding of dogs, reported the Korea Times.

Animal Liberation Wave, an animal rights group that launched a campaign against the farms in January, praises the introduction of the bill.

“There are more than 3,000 dog farms where a million dogs get slaughtered every year,” it said in a statement this week. “We hope the bill will become a law to take the first step to end the dog meat industry in Korea.”

The campaign seeks to ban the production and consumption of dog meat and to have dogs legally defined as companions only.

It is still legal to breed dogs to sell their meat in South Korea — and to consume it — as long as the animals are not killed in open areas.

The practice of eating dog meat has been declining, and younger Koreans are generally opposed to it.

But the tradition continues among older people, many of whom believe dog meat aids their virility.

Under livestock industry law, farmers can pursue profit with livestock, which includes dogs and many other animals. But according to the Livestock Processing Act, dogs are not categorized as livestock.

As a result of that, dog meat cannot be traded through major distribution channels like other meat. Instead it is most often sold directly to restaurants, or at outdoor markets.

According to the Seoul Metropolitan Government, the number of restaurants serving dog meat soup, known as “bosintang,” decreased from 528 in 2005 to 329 in 2014.

Regardless, the ALW says, there are still up to 3,000 dog meat farms operating in the country, where more than a million are raised each year, only to be slaughtered for their meat.

The Animal Liberation Wave (ALW), in partnership with the international animal rights organization Last Chance for Animals (LCA), launched a global campaign to ban dog meat from South Korea. The campaign started with a website, petition page (www.donghaemul.com/stopdogmeat) and video against dog meat.

Jiyen Lee, the founder of ALW, said, “there has been a tendency in this country to consider the dog meat issue as a matter of personal choice when in fact it is the government who is hugely responsible for exacerbating the problem by failing to formulate social consensus.

“It is high time that a change is made to fit the current Korean society where 1 out of 5 nationals are living with dogs as companions.”

As part of the campaign, a “Flower Dog Project” is underway, featuring 8 dog statues that will appear in major cities.

(Image, from the Flower Dog Project, via Animal Liberation Wave)

Iran looks at making dog-owning a crime

Lawmakers in Iran have proposed a bill to criminalize dog ownership.

Traditionally frowned upon and grudgingly tolerated by Islamic leaders, having a dog would become a crime if the bill is passed by Parliament, punishable by fines and confiscation of dogs.

According to a Time magazine report, backers of the bill warn that dogs pose health hazards, and their increasing popularity as pets is “a blind imitation of the vulgar culture of the West.”

Those caught walking and keeping “impure and dangerous animals” would have their dogs confiscated and face fines of $100 to $500.

What would become of confiscated dogs isn’t spelled out.

Dog ownership has become more popular in Iran with the rise of an urban middle class, and Time reports that “these days, lap dogs rival designer sunglasses as the upper-middle-class Iranian’s accessory of choice.”

A senior Iranian cleric last year decreed dogs are “unclean” and issued a fatwa ordering they not be kept as pets.

Israeli military denies it trains dogs to attack upon hearing “God is Great” in Arabic

The Israeli military has denied allegations that it trains its dogs to attack anybody heard saying “Allah-u Akbar,” Arabic for “God is great,” Ha’aretz and other local media reported Tuesday.

Israeli Arab deputy Ahmed Tibi on Monday told the Israeli parliament that at a dog unit ceremony held the day before, parents of the soldiers witnessed demonstrations proving the allegations.

“Israeli military dogs are trained to pounce and attack any Arab who shouts ‘Allah-u Akbar,’ as a Pavlovian reaction,” Tibi was quoted as saying. The phrase is one that has been shouted by suicide bombers before detonating explosive devices.

Speculations of such practice were exposed first by Israel Radio’s military correspondent, Carmela Menashe.

Responding to the allegations, the Israeli military said in a statement: “One of the canine unit’s many capabilities is to train the dogs to locate the enemy when dressed both in uniform and as civilian. This is an ability that has proven itself in many cases.”