OUR BEST FRIENDS

The Sergei Foundation

shelterpet_logo

The Animal Rescue Site

B-more Dog

aldflogo

Pinups for Pitbulls

philadoptables

TFPF_Logo

Mid Atlantic Pug Rescue

Our Pack, Inc.

Maine Coonhound Rescue

Saving Shelter Pets, Inc.

mabb

LD Logo Color

Tag: pit bull mix

When an incoming dog becomes an outgoing dog a little too quickly

jake

In most big city animal control departments, dogs who are brought in often don’t come out alive.

But here’s a story with a different twist — of a dog in Philadelphia who was brought into animal control by a good Samaritan, but apparently given away by staff before he got much past the front counter.

If you need some idea before you continue of whether this is going to have a happy ending, be advised, yes, sort of. The pit bull mix who was given away before he was fully taken in is still alive, but slightly the worse for wear.

Most fingers are pointing at the front desk staff of the city’s Animal Care and Control Team, which apparently decided to make an exception to its 48-hour hold policy.

Chris Ferraro, 30, was walking his dog near his home in Manayunk when a pit bull mix wandered up. He played with Ferraro’s dog, but when no owner showed up, Ferraro took him to the city’s animal control office.

As columnist Stu Bykofsky explains in the Philadelphia Daily News, Ferraro was filling out the necessary paperwork to turn a dog in when another man approached the desk and asked if Jake was his dog.

When Ferraro said no, the other man asked if he could have him.

“No,” Ferraro replied. “He’s someone else’s dog.”

An ACCT kennel attendant interrupted the exchange, and told the man he could have the dog — after the owner had a chance to reclaim him.

By policy, the office holds dogs 48 hours before allowing them to be adopted.

But, as Ferraro watched, and protested, that policy was apparently violated. The second man’s information was taken by ACCT and Jake — who had no tags or microchip — was later allowed to leave with the man.

Meanwhile, Jake’s owners, Vickie and Mark Remolde, were working to find him. They’d checked with the Montgomery County SPCA, and put up fliers when he disappeared July 13.

On July 15, Mark went to ACCT, looked for Jake among the animals sheltered there and left some fliers.

As it turns out, that visit was within the 48-hour window for owners to reclaim their dogs. But Jake was long gone — given to that other man, who from the sound of it, was not too thoroughly vetted.

It wasn’t until a few days later that the Remoldes heard that Ferraro had turned a dog that looked like Jake into ACCT, made contact with him, and returned, twice, to the animal control office.

ACCT staff, this time, was able to locate the man who had Jake and, unable to reach him, went to the address he had provided.

He wasn’t there.

“I started crying,” said Vickie. “This guy took him for purposes that were not good, and how could you give my dog to a man in the lobby who was there to intercept dogs?”

Several days later, the man brought Jake in.

According to Vickie Remolde, “Jake is 10 to 15 pounds lighter; he had a red rash on his neck; and something was wrong with his tail … It was black, like charcoal.”

ACCT executive director Vincent Medley told the Daily News that Ferraro had left before completing the intake form. Ferraro denies that and says he was told he was no longer needed.

The new owner’s form was being processed when he left, Ferraro said.

Medley said that if Ferraro was uncomfortable with the proceedings, he should have asked for a supervisor.

Spoken like a true bureaucrat, right?

Rather than shift the blame and cover its butt, ACCT should be investigating that second man, and what happened to Jake, and why staff didn’t follow the agency’s own policy.

(Photo: Philly.com)

Dog thrown off bridge after ‘it got in the way’

bridge hound

Not that there are any acceptable ones, but we’ve been hearing some pretty flimsy excuses for abusing dogs in recent weeks.

First there was the Chicago man who allegedly stabbed a neighbor’s dog to death because it tore his $3.78 shirt.

Then came the Salt Lake City woman who’s accused of spraying Raid down her dog’s throat, killing it, to keep her ex-husband from taking the dog with him when he left. (We’d say it’s probably a good thing he left.)

drewThen, this week in North Carolina, a New Bern man told WCTI News he threw a dog off a drawbridge and into the Trent River “because it got in the way.”

Samuel Drew, 36, appeared before a judge Monday. He is charged with animal cruelty and faces up to 10 years in prison after witnesses said they saw him throw a hound mix off the Alfred A. Cunningham drawbridge in downtown New Bern just before noon Saturday, NewsChannel 12 reported.

In a courthouse hallway, he was asked why. You can see his response here — one so casual it’s clear he considers dogs disposable, a view that seems to be at the root of all three cases.

Drew also admitted to police what he’d done, officers say. “He admitted to us that he had, in fact, thrown the dog over the bridge into the river,” said Officer Doug Evans. Drew told police he was annoyed that the hound, along with a pit bull mix, were following him, and that he was going to throw the pit bull off the bridge too, but couldn’t get a hold of him, Evans said.

A pair of boaters, Patsy and Jesse Tripp, saw the dog thrown into the water.Patty Tripp jumped in the water to rescue him and swam with him to shore. Another boater managed to pull the dog from the water, but was bitten in the process.

Both the hound mix and the pit bull were taken to Craven-Pamlico Animal Services Center. Trinity Smith, an animal control supervisor told WNCT that the two dogs were traveling together and it is unknown whether the dogs have an owner. If an owner does not step forward, they will be put up for adoption, Smith said.

Sittin’ on the dock of the SPCA

otisreddingposterKim Wolf at the Pennsylvania SPCA is pulling out all the stops to find a home for Otis Redding,  a 7-year-old pit bull mix who has been at the shelter for months.

Here’s one of the imaginative steps she has taken — a poster promoting Otis Redding.

She’s also made a video which can be seen here.

“I’m trying really hard to find him a home,” said Wolf, adding that, were it not for the five dogs she already has, she’d take him home herself.

Otis Redding’s $75 adoption fee includes neutering, a microchip, 3 free weeks of veterinary care, and 1 year of vaccinations. Wolf says he gets along with everyone, including other dogs, cats, and kids. 

We give Kim points for ingenuity and suspect that, if her efforts to find a home for Otis are successful, we’ll soon be hearing about more adoptable dogs available in Philadelphia, with names like Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Marvin Gaye and Barry White.

Bloody Saturday at White Rock (Dog Park)

A bloody confrontation Saturday at the White Rock Dog Park in Dallas left a woman’s face slashed, a man charged with aggravated assault and carrying a switchblade, and pit bulls, as usual, bearing the blame.

Michael Armalavage, 44, was arrested after he accidentally slashed another dog owner while trying to protect himself and his Australian shepherd from an attack by another dog, described as a pit bull-Rhodesian ridgeback mix.

Krisha Pembroke, 30, whose dog, Bosh, was on a leash but apparently not under control, received a gash just above her right eye, according to the Dallas Morning News. The paper’s crime blog has Armalavage’s account of the incident, and is getting dozens of reader comments about the incident, mostly saying pit bulls, and pit bull mixes, should be banned from the park if not from the city.

Nobody, as you might guess, is calling for a Rhodesian ridgeback ban.

“I don’t have problems with him,” Pembroke said of her dog. “I’ve had him since he was a baby.” But witnesses say the dog dragged her owner across the park and latched on to the nose of Armalavage’s dog. The shepherd required a dozen stitches.

Pembroke says she doesn’t want to press charges agains Armalavage, and offered to pay his vet bill.

White Rock is a leash-free dog park.