OUR BEST FRIENDS

whs-logo

The Sergei Foundation

shelterpet_logo

The Animal Rescue Site

B-more Dog

aldflogo

Pinups for Pitbulls

philadoptables

TFPF_Logo

Mid Atlantic Pug Rescue

Our Pack, Inc.

Maine Coonhound Rescue

Saving Shelter Pets, Inc.

mabb

LD Logo Color

Tag: police department

Police officer refuses woman’s request that he shoot a dog damaging her car

An outraged Georgia woman, displeased that police weren’t doing more to stop a dog who was trying to rip off her car’s bumper, went live on Facebook in an attempt to show what she saw as malfeasance on the part of law enforcement.

Instead, she ended up bringing negative attention, and even death threats, upon herself — mainly because of her insistence that the officer shoot the dog.

The video, taken on November 9th by the car’s owner, Jessica Dilallo, shows a pit bull type dog trying to rip off the new car’s bumper as Dilallo complains that Dalton Police Lieutenant Matthew Locke should be doing more.

At one point she asks him to shoot the dog or throw a rock at it.

Locke calmly declined, pointing out the dog was not being aggressive to any humans.

The dog was apparently after two cats hiding under the car’s hood.

“And so when he finally gets to whatever he’s going to we get to watch him destroy that as well? The cat gets to die, too?” Dilallo complains.

Locke tells her an officer with a catchpole is on his way. As the video ends, an officer can be seen approaching with an improvised catchpole.

A police spokesman said that when Locke arrived at the home, the dog walked “right up to his window and was not aggressive towards people. The dog resumed attacking the car’s bumper.”

“Lt. Locke decided not to try to pull the dog off himself because he didn’t want to be in a position where the dog attacked him and he was forced to shoot the dog,” the spokesman said.

Police later located the dog’s owner, Ben Bonds, and he agreed to pay Dilallo $500 for her insurance deductible. He was issued a warning to not let his dog run loose.

Dilallo spoke with NewsChannel 9 on Wednesday, saying the Facebook posting has brought her harsh criticism.

“I’m like the most hated person right now because I said I wanted to shoot the dog, but I still stand by that.”

Lt. Locke said he stands by his decision, and that using a stun gun or pepper spray on the dog might have made it more aggressive.

“My whole goal was to try to keep it contained, catch it and identify the owner and ultimately that’s what we did,” Locke said.

The dog was taken to a shelter but is now back home — and in a fenced yard.

K-9 partner among those paying last respects to slain Kentucky police officer

figo

Figo wasn’t with his partner when the 33-year-old police officer was shot and killed alongside the road, but the German shepherd attended the funeral and paid his respects.

Jason Ellis, a K-9 officer with the Bardstown Police Department in Kentucky, was shot and killed last Saturday when he stopped to remove some debris from the road, according to the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Police said he was shot multiple times with a shotgun by an unknown assailant.

Ellis was buried Thursday after a funeral service held on the seventh anniversary of his taking the oath as a police officer in Bardstown, a town of about 12,000 people, located 40 miles southeast of Louisville.

The funeral at Parkway Baptist Church, just off Blue Grass Parkway in Bardstown, drew law enforcement officers from Chicago, Pennsylvania, Ohio and across Kentucky, many of them K-9 officers who brought their dogs.

Attendees filled the sanctuary’s 1,000 seats, 500 more seats in a fellowship hall, and were lined up along the walls. After service in the church, there was a 20-mile procession to the rural cemetery in Chaplin where Ellis was buried.

At the funeral, Ellis was remembered as a family man, friend and a hero. Bardstown Police Chief Rick McCubbin said Ellis “paid the ultimate sacrifice doing what he loved: being a police officer.”

(Photo by Jonathan Palmer / Lexington Herald-Leader)

Chicago police dog Bear goes missing again

Bear, a Chicago police dog who went missing last month during a thunderstorm, has disappeared again.

On May 13, Bear jumped a 6-foot-high fence at his handler’s home and was found four days later outside Evergreen Cemetery.

On Saturday, the German Shepherd disappeared again, according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

Police were conducting a search for the dog Sunday morning. They described Bear as a 74-pound German Shepherd trained to track, do search and rescue and search property. The dog is black and tan in color and has an identification computer chip implanted under his skin.

Chicago Police dogs live with their handlers. The typical police dog costs more than $5,000, according to the department’s website, and must undergo 12 to 16 weeks of training.

Rochester cops shoot mostly at dogs

banner_policecarTwo of every three shots fired by police in Rochester, N.Y., are fired at dogs; and four of every five shots fired at dogs were aimed at pit bulls.

Those are just a couple of the more stunning statistics presented in an article in yesterday’s Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.

Police have shot at 87 dogs, killing 35 and injuring 33, in the line of duty over the last five years, according to a review of police reports from 2004 to April 2009 obtained by the Democrat and Chronicle under the Freedom of Information law. Some of the injured were later euthanized.

Over the same period, police fired at nine people and used their guns to kill 36 deer, all of them injured before police were summoned. Guns discharged accidentally three times.

All of the dog shootings were determined to be within Rochester Police Department guidelines, which permit the use of deadly force on animals when they are attacking or “presenting an imminent danger” to any person.

Some of the dangers described in the police reports, though, sound something less than imminent: Read more »

Dog that won cloning contest passes away

Trakr, the German Shepherd search and rescue dog whose owner won an an essay contest to have him cloned, died last week at his home. He was 16.

Trakr was credited with hundreds of arrests and recovered more than one million dollars in stolen goods while serving the police department of Halifax, Nova Scotia. After the dog retired, his owner, and police department handler, James Symington, took TrakR to the World Trade Center after 9/11 to assist in search efforts.

There, according to Symington, Trakr, in addition to finding several casualties, found the last survivor in the rubble of 9/11 — Genelle Guzman.

Afterwards, Trakr was presented with the Extraordinary Service to Humanity Award by Dr. Jane Goodall, and was featured in books and magazines dedicated to 9/11 heroes including, “Dog World” and “In the Line of Duty.”

After his 9/11 work, Trakr collapsed from smoke and chemical inhalation, burns and exhaustion. Likely a result of this exposure, the press release announcing his death says, Trakr was disabled for the past two years.

Symington, whose trip to the World Trade Center was considered an unauthorized absence by his police department, left the department and moved to California afterwards to pursue an acting career. He took Trakr with him. Symington says the police department was considering a policy to euthanize retiring K9 dogs.

Commenting on Trakr’s life, Symington said, “I am honored to have been Trakr’s partner, best friend and lifelong companion. He possessed a rare combination of uncanny intuition, pure heart, and relentless courage and has been an inspiration to so many. He’ll live in my heart forever.”

In 2008, Trakr received international attention again when BioArts International named him the “World’s Most Cloneworthy Dog.” This honor enables Trakr’s DNA to be used to clone a puppy, which Symington, now head of entertainment talent management firm Prodigy Talent Group, plans to name Prodigy.

The press release makes no mention of the status of the cloning.

Symington is not paying for the cloning of Trakr; it was awarded to him for winning a BioArts essay contest last summer.

Symington and his wife, who live in Los Angeles, have been approached by various Hollywood executives and best-selling authors to turn Trakr’s story into a book and movie, according to the press release.