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Tag: police

Leashing the wife: Not advisable


A Maryland man police say was leading his wife around by a dog leash at the York Fair in Pennsylvania was charged with simple assault.

West Manheim Township police filed the charge against 66-year-old Walter W. Wolford, of Hagerstown, on Saturday, according to Penn Live.

Police said Wolford, of Hagerstown, had his wife, Catherine, attached to a red nylon dog leash and yanked the leash, causing her head to jerk back, resulting in red marks around her throat.

Wolford told officers said he only gently tugged on the leash, which he told investigators he used to keep his wife, who suffers from late-stage dementia, from getting lost.

Officer Bradley J. Cleck said in reports that he was called to the York Fair to investigate the incident and saw that Catherine Wolford had red marks on her throat.

He tried to speak to her, but she did not know where she was, or her name, he said.

Walter Wolford told the officer he was embarrassed about the situation. He explained that when the couple visited the fair last year, she had wandered away and was lost for 90 minutes. He said he put her on a leash to prevent that from happening again.

He originally attached the leash to her waist, but it somehow moved up around her neck, he told the officer. He said he had only “gently tugged on the leash so she would stop.”

After consulting with the York Area Agency on Aging and the district attorney’s office, police charged Wolford with simple assault.

He is set for a preliminary hearing Sept. 28.

The York Fair, billed as “America’s First Fair,” is has been held on on the first Friday after Labor Day for more than 250 years.

(Photo: York County Fair from Pennlive.com)

Your dog is loyal — your smartphone is not

If you have a few years on you, you remember the stool pigeon from old black and white movies.

He was a jumpy fellow, usually, maybe with a twitch, ready to rat out a fellow con in exchange for a few bucks, a bottle of gin, or a break on his sentence.

He was usually less than totally trustworthy, and he usually came to a bad end.

In today’s full color, technology-obsessed world, there’s a new, far more reliable, stool pigeon.

He’s far easier to access than meeting up in a smoky bar. He has a photographic memory. He has the goods on you. And he’ll dish that information out to the coppers with just the push of a few buttons.

He is generally one of two varieties — Apple or Android.

When Pennsylvania State Police in Harrisburg found the bodies of two boxer mixes near the roadway, and learned through a tip who they belonged to, the suspect’s cell phone provided virtually all the information needed to make their case.

On it, they found texts to his wife which included his messages that “someone called the cops and told them I killed them” and “do not tell the state police anything.”

They also found he had been googling — 82 incriminating cell phone searches that included “how to destroy your house pet,” “is it legal to kill your dog,” and “punishment for killing your dog in PA.”

Bryan Gardner, 47, was charged with aggravated cruelty to animals, cruelty to animals, and neglect of animals after the dogs were discovered, back in March, in a ditch in Middle Paxton Township.

One dog had a gunshot wound to the abdomen, and the other had significant trauma to its head and stomach.

In an interview with police, Gardner denied any involvement with the killing or dumping of the dogs, and told his interviewer “you don’t have anything,” according to a criminal complaint.

PennLive.com reports that Gardner told officers the dogs ran off while he was walking them.

Investigators spoke with Gardner’s wife, Andrea, who said her husband told her he gave the dogs away. Andrea refused to take a polygraph test or allow police to review text messages between her and her husband.

Police then obtained a search warrant for Gardner’s cell phone records, and officers found the text messages.

The web searches were made both before an after Gardner was initially confronted by police, according to the complaint.

If the warrant to get his phone holds up in court, he faces a bit of an uphill battle.

Good, you might say, and you might be right.

There are arguments to be made about privacy, too, but for now we will make these two conclusions:

One, smartphones, like computers, have made it much easier to pull off a host of bad deeds — from scams to affairs and with the Internet serving as accomplice — but they have also made it a whole lot easier to get caught.

Two, this guy’s smartphone showed itself to be about as loyal to him as he (allegedly) was to his dogs.

She plans to adopt dog she saved from bay

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The New Jersey woman who rescued a 1-year-old pit bull from drowning in a crate is planning to adopt the dog.

Jennifer Vaz was walking her dog Molly to see the sunrise at Sandy Hook Bay when she heard a dog’s whimpers coming from the waterside of the rock bulkhead.

“Molly was noticing something and wanted to take me off the trail,” she told CBS News. “When I looked down in the water, I saw River and I saw his little black eyes looking back at me.”

The dog was in a black wire crate, and the tide was coming in.

Vaz climbed over the wall to save the dog, now named River.

Her own dog followed.

“Molly actually followed me and assisted me,” Vaz said. “She went into the crate and licked him and he followed her.”

Officials said the cage was on a small portion of land between the bulkhead and water – and at the time of the rescue around 6:15 a.m., water had already reached the cage.

River was taken to the Highlands Police Department, which notified animal control. When animal control team arrived at the bayfront scene a few hours later, the cage was almost covered by the rising tide.

In a Facebook post, the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office announced it was seeking help in finding the person responsible for leaving the dog in black wire cage in Veterans Memorial Park.

Anyone with information about River is asked to call the Animal Cruelty Hot Line at 877-898-7297 or Highlands police at 732-872-1224.

The Monmouth County SPCA says River is in good condition.

Once she is cleared for adoption, Vaz hopes to adopt her. Meanwhile, she will foster her.

“It just feels like the right thing to do,” said Vaz, who picked him up Wednesday. “He feels like he’s part of our family.”

Dog performing CPR? Not really

To hear some websites tell it, this police dog is actually performing CPR on this fellow officer.

The video was released on Twitter last week by the Municipal Police of Madrid, but the staged demonstration was more an attempt to draw “awwwwwws” than portray any reality.

In the video, an officer drops to the ground, landing on his back. An announcer calls for help and a K-9 responder named Poncho runs to his side, jumping up and down on the officer’s chest.

It may look like he’s performing compression techniques, and checking to see if the officer is breathing, but those are all tricks he has been taught.

Impressive, but not life-saving.

Of course, as with so many viral videos, we don’t always learn the facts until long after the myth they are perpetuating spreads across the globe. The video has been viewed more than 2 millions times.

The Washington Post pointed out the video shows a dog mimicking CPR, not performing it:

Poncho’s performance was a well-done “trick” but not really a first-aid technique, said Ronnie Johnson, lead trainer at Global Training Academy, a training center for K-9s in Somerset, Tex. Police dogs can be taught to do a variety of things, but CPR isn’t one of them. “I don’t think a dog could actually do CPR,” Johnson said, explaining that the lifesaving measure requires precision and strength …

Jonathan Epstein, senior director of science and government relations for the Red Cross, said the video is “cute” but “from a medical perspective, it’s not truly providing CPR.”

Madrid police, in tweeting the video, did little to point out it was all a trick, writing that the “heroic” police dog, named Poncho, “did not hesitate for a moment to ‘save the life’ of the agent.

Deaf pit bull gets job in law enforcement

A deaf and “unadoptable” dog in Florida is now working in law enforcement in the opposite corner of the country.

Ghost, a pitbull mix, was deemed unadoptable by animal control officials in Florida because of his deafness.

Ghostleashes1A Florida rescue group, Swamp Haven Rescue, assisted in having him moved to Washington state, where he was spotted by longtime dog trainer Barb Davenport, KING5 reported.

Davenport has been training drug search dogs for the state since the 1980s. She says Ghost is the first deaf dog that the state has used in law enforcement — and might be the first in the country.

On the job, Ghost’s handicap may serve as an advantage.

“It seems to make him even more focused,” said Davenport, K-9 Program Manager for the state’s Department of Corrections.

Ghost started searching for drugs inside state prisons and other secure facilities in January.

Already he has located drugs hidden in the prison, officials say.

(Photo: Washington state DSHS)

Two men jailed in China after insulting police officer who clubbed a dog to death

(The video above is disturbing and may offend some readers.)

 

Two men served five days in jail in China after publicly insulting a police officer who killed a golden retriever on a street in Changsha, the capital of Hunan Province.

The arrests were made Dec. 31, the same day one of the men posted pictures and personal details about the policeman on a Twitter-like social media platform called Weibo.

The second man was arrested on charges of publicly insulting the officer.

The policeman was filmed beating the leashed dog to death with a wooden club.

According to Changsha Police’s social media account, each of the two men was given a five-day detention for disclosing confidential information of a police officer and showing disrespect to a police officer.

The policeman’s actions were praised by some, the Daily Mail reported, while others criticized the “cruel” and “heartless” manner he employed to kill the dog.

The leashed dog had lunged at several people walking by on the sidewalk where he was tethered and bitten at least two of them.

The officer said he did not have access to a tranquilizing gun and decided to use a wooden club to kill the canine instead.

Gang members arrested in China for selling poison darts used to kill dogs for meat

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Thousands of poisoned syringes that were sold to dog meat vendors to instantly kill dogs on the streets have been seized by police in China.

The police investigation led to the discovery of a ton of dead dogs at a storage facility in the eastern province of Anhui, and the arrest of eight gang members who were selling the weapon in 20 provinces and regions across the China, the news agency Xinhua said.

Police believe the gang sold more than 200,000 poisoned syringes to vendors who hunted pets on the street and traded their meat with restaurants.

The syringes contained a large enough dose of the muscle relaxant suxamethonium to kill the dogs instantly — and enough to be toxic to any human later consuming the dog’s meat.

Police said the needles were modified with a spring and a tailfin at the rear so they could be shot like a dart.

The Telegraph reported that the investigation into the gang began in September when police were tipped off by a postal worker who came across a suspicious package leaking a pungent smelling fluid.

syringesThey discovered 200 syringes in the package, and arrested the man who it was being delivered to in Huainan city, in Anhui.

Police then arrested two accomplices who shot the dogs in local streets, before finding a ton of frozen dogs at a nearby cold storage.

The men had frozen the meat and had planned to sell it in the winter.

Police also raided the gang’s workshop in central China’s Hubei Province, where they arrested another five men who were making the syringes.

At that site they discovered four kilograms of the chemical powder, 10,000 needles and 100,000 yuan, or more than $15,000, Xinhua said.

The poisoned darts have been in use for years. Two years ago, in Hunan province, a man who ran a dog meat-selling operation shot himself with one while demonstrating how to fire one with a crossbow. He died on his way to the hospital.

The other members of the operation were later arrested, and confessed to freezing the canine carcasses with the intention of selling the meat to restaurants.

“The dog meat trade in China is organized, large scale and facilitated by crime, with as many as 20 million dogs and four million cats killed every year,” said Wendy Higgins, from the Humane Society International. “Stopping the gangs involved is a major step in the right direction.”

She added: “The use of poison to catch dogs for the meat trade is a cruelty that very often sees people’s beloved pets targeted, and the animals involved can suffer enormously.”

Dog meat has long been consumed by humans in China and other Asian countries. It is eaten by a small minority of Chinese, and the practice is fading as dogs become a popular pet.