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Tag: poodles

Supersize me: Americans turning to big dogs

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Big dogs — not that they ever left — are coming back.

In its annual report on breed popularity in the U.S., the American Kennel Club notes that, while the Labrador retriever is again the most popular dog breed, other large breeds are quickly moving up the list, including Dobermans, giant schnauzers and Great Danes.

According to the AKC, it could be a sign of an improving economy.

“Owning bigger breeds – an economic indicator of sorts – has been on the rise during the past five years,” said Lisa Peterson, AKC spokeswoman. “As the economy has improved, people are turning back to the big dogs they love, which cost more to feed and care for than the smaller breeds that saw a rise in popularity in 2007 and 2008.”

Labs took the top spot for the 23rd straight year, the longest consecutive reign of any dog in the annual ranking. The rankings are based on the number of AKC dog registrations across the country.

Here are the top 10, with links to their AKC profiles:

1. Labrador Retriever
2. German Shepherd Dog
3. Golden Retriever
4. Beagle
5. Bulldog
6. Yorkshire Terrier
7. Boxer
8. Poodle
9. Rottweiler
10. Dachshund

Comparing those rankings to the 2009 list, there’s evidence of a decline in small dog popularity — Yorkies dropped three places, from third, dachshunds dropped two, from eighth, and shih tzus fell out of the top 10 entirely.

Some smaller breeds saw a gain in popularity, like the French bulldog (now 11th). But far greater gains were made by greatly sized dogs: Doberman Pinschers rose from 22 to 12; Great Danes from 27 to 16; and Bernese Mountain Dogs from 47 to 32.

The AKC announced its rankings Friday, in advance of the upcoming Westminster Kennel Club dog show at Madison Square Garden.

Three new breeds will compete this year: rat terriers, Chinooks, and Portuguese Podengo Pequenos.

(Photo: Ash, a lab, or perhaps a lab mix (we didn’t ask for his papers), at play; by John Woestendiek)

Enraging: Poodle found dead in parked car

mulcahy - CopyA Virginia woman has been charged with  animal cruelty after two dogs were found locked in her car Saturday — one of them dead.

Sharon Mulcahy, 62, of Richmond, told  police she’d arrived at a motel in Baltimore the night  before with her “bowels overflowing,” and left the dogs in her car while she checked into a room, according to the Baltimore Sun.

“Ms. Mulcahy stated that she was going to go back downstairs to care for the  dogs, but instead decided to go to sleep, leaving the two dogs inside the vehicle for approximately 19 hours,” the police report said.

Temperatures in Baltimore reached the mid-90s on Saturday. Police said one window of the car was cracked open about two inches, but that the dogs — both poodles — had no food or water.

Inside the car, they found a six-year-old brown poodle named Missy dead, laying across the center console. A second poodle, Bear on the floor of the drivers seat. Bear survived.

Police found Mulcahy in the laundry room of the hotel. She was charged with six counts of animal cruelty and two counts of restraining a dog without shelter or food and water.

Fifty-one dogs seized from Maryland home

Fifty-one dogs were seized Monday from a home in Pasadena, Maryland, by Anne Arundel County animal control officers.

The owners of the home described themselves as dog breeders, but admitted their operation ”got out of hand,” The Capital in Annapolis reported.

Animal Control officers visited the home in the Green Gables neighborhood after receiving an anonymous tip.

Because homeowners Chuck Richard and his wife, Pam, didn’t have a dog fancier license, laws required they have no more than four dogs. The county plans to give the couple a citation and a $50 fine, police said.

Officers seized dozens of poodles, Yorkshire terriers and other dogs from the two-story home in the 1800 block of Choptank Road. The animals are being housed at the animals at the county shelter in Millersville.

Other than being dirty, the dogs seemed in good shape, and all but one appeared to be well-fed, animal control officials said.

The Richards were visited in 2006 by animal control officials who counted 24 dogs, but didn’t give the couple a citation.

Richard told The Capital that when the recession hit, it became harder to sell dogs.

“It just got harder and harder to find homes,” he said. “You hear about people hoarding, but it wasn’t like that. This just got out of hand.”

“I’m sad to see them go,” he added, “but in a strange way, it’s a relief.”

County Executive John R. Leopold is urging residents to visit the county shelter and adopt the animals. The animal shelter is open from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

Should Arizona deport Siberian huskies?

Cooling my heels in Phoenix, I’ve been trying to catch up with the latest on SB 1070, the new legislation that will turn Arizona’s police officers into immigration officials, requiring them to check the citizenship of anyone they confront in the course of their duties.

The law makes violating federal immigration laws a state crime, if that makes any sense, and some fear it will lead to large scale profiling and deportations as Arizona takes into its own hands matters it feels the federal government isn’t addressing.

Of course, the law applies to humans, and not dogs, but what if? What if the motivation for it — to keep undocumented foreigners from the shores of a country pretty much built by undocumented foreigners — was applied to the dog kingdom?

What if all the Irish setters –or at least those who lacked the proper paperwork — were sent back to Ireland; or if all the German shepherds were deported to Germany; or if Labrador retrievers, Tibetan Mastiffs, French poodles and Afghan hounds were all sent back to their place of origin?

The dog kingdom would be a much more boring place.

If all of them were required to live where they originated, we wouldn’t have anywhere near the magnificent diversity of dog breeds — not to mention hybrids and mutts — that we enjoy today. It would be so long, Welsh Corgi; seeya, Belgian Malinois; goodbye, Bo, and all other Portuguese water dogs.

Go back to Rhodesia, you Ridgebacks.

Probably, in our haste, we’d even deport Great Danes to Denmark, even though the breed didn’t originate there. (Once local law enforcement and state bureaucracies get involved, mistakes are bound to happen.) And, Siberian huskies, you don’t even want to think about where you’d be banished to.

A valid argument can be made that Siberian huskies shouldn’t be living in Arizona’s heat in the first place – but banishing them, or pestering them for their paperwork so often they decide to leave, obviously isn’t the solution.

If that were the case, I never would have met Sasha and Kodi, brother and sister huskies belonging to Sandy Fairall, who we hung out with yesterday at “Bark Place,” the dog park at Quail Run Park in Mesa.

No pedigree is required to enter, and dogs of all sizes, shapes, backgrounds and colors were playing together nicely. No one was asking anyone else to leave, no one was questioning anyone else’s pedigree, and everyone, dog and human, seemed happy to share the shady spots.

Sandy admits Phoenix is not an ideal locale for the cold weather dogs – something she’s reminded of whenever she heads to the mountains in winter to let them experience their more natural surroundings and play in the snow.

But they seem to be thriving and happy to be here. They seem to have adjusted. They haven’t taken anyone’s job, committed any crimes or put undue strain on the health care system.

I say – paperwork or not — let them stay.

Rescued puppy mill pup … dancing for joy?

The Humane Society of the United States says this dog — one of more than 200 the organization assisted in removing from a Tennessee puppy mill last week — is dancing for joy.

At the very least, she’s headed for a better life than that afforded at Gayla’s Poodle Palace, in Sparta, Tennessee, where dismal conditions led the White County Sheriff’s office to seize 225 dogs.

Nearly 100 of the dogs, mostly small, designer breed puppies, were shipped to Chicago in a trailer, with others being sent to shelters and rescues in Nashville and Bowling Green, Kentucky, WPTV reported.

“These animals are very relieved,” said Justin Scally, the manager of the Puppy Mill Task Force for the HSUS. “There’s a noticeable difference from the time that they were removed from the puppy mill and were placed in the emergency shelter, and each day they have gotten better.”

Volunteers were cleaning and evaluating the dogs this week before placing them up for adoption.

Gayla’s Little Poodle Palace shut down

Gayla’s Little Poodle Palace, on the outskirts of Sparta, Tennessee, wasn’t so little.

More than 200 dogs — 221, according to the Humane Society of the United States — were seized from the puppy mill last week by the White County Sheriff’s Department after complaints that they were being housed in unsanitary conditions and lacked proper socialization and medical care.

All of the animals have been surrendered by the owner to the custody of the White County Sheriff’s Department, according to an HSUS press release.

The HSUS assisted in removing the animals and transporting them to an emergency shelter set up and staffed by the HSUS, the White County Humane Society and United Animal Nations. There, the dogs will be examined by a team of veterinarians before being transferred to animal shelters for evaluation and adoption.

“These dogs were being sold to unsuspecting consumers over the Internet and through newspaper advertisements. This should be a reminder to anyone looking for a new pet to first consider adoption, and only purchase a dog if you have personally visited the breeder,” said Leighann McCollum, HSUS Tennessee state director.

The dogs, mostly toy poodles, some with serious medical issues, were all living living in a small home.

Sheriff Oddie Shoupe said puppy mill owner Gayla Jackson was cooperating with authorities.

“She said she needed the help and didn’t know where to turn, and that this was a blessing in disguise,” said Shoupe. “She started grooming dogs, then it blossomed into a breeding operation, and it was too much for her to take care of.”

More than 500 dogs taken from Texas breeder

Texas police and Humane Society officials seized 500 to 600 dogs and about 15 cats Tuesday in a raid on what they say is a puppy mill in Kaufman County, Fox News reported.

The Humane Society began investigating the kennel when someone came to them inquiring about dog food donations for the operation. Authorities found poor living conditions and sickly animals when they visited the location.

The kennel operated in a large metal building in a rural area near the Prairieville community, about 45 miles southwest of Dallas.

The animals seized are mostly Chihuahuas, poodles and other small-breed dogs. They were examined by vets to determine which ones needed medical attention.

The seizure was conducted by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), in conjunction with the Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake and the Kaufman County Sheriff’s Department.

“This day marks a new beginning for these animals, who are suffering from a variety of serious health conditions and have been kept in constant confinement their entire lives producing puppies for the profit of the mill owner,” said Scotlund Haisley, senior director of Emergency Services at HSUS.

The dogs were found to be living in filthy conditions. Many were severely matted and suffering from chronic infected wounds, internal and external parasites and serious skin and eye infections, officials said.

All of the animals were being transported to a nearby emergency shelter.