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Tag: portraiture

More stunning dog photography

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A Moscow-based husband-and-wife photography team has released another series of dog portraits, and it’s just as spectacular as the first.

Alexander Khokhlov and Veronica Ershova have been a team for years — he taking the pictures, she doing the post-production work — but it was only last year that they turned their attention to dogs.

Intended to visually “explore the wonderful world of our four-legged friends,” The Dog Show, Season 2 continues to showcase dogs in photos that show them in expressive poses that highlight their individual spirit.

This year’s subjects include a Bedlington terrier, a pug, a weimaraner, a Basenji (above), and pictured below, this Australian shepherd.

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This Newfoundland, bloodhound, and trio of xolos were equally striking.

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Khokhlov was born in Calcutta, India. He is now based in Moscow and works as a commercial photographer in creative duo with designer and retouching expert Ershova.

Alexander’s works and interviews are featured in world mass media including CNN, Town & Country, PDN Magazine, Scientific American MIND, Professional Photographer, Talk Magazine, Huffington Post, The Daily Mail, Wired, Holland Herald, Stern, 20 minutos, Quotation, Life magazine, Petapixel.com, Phlearn.com and others.

You can see a much wider selection at mymodernmet.com, and even more at alexanderkhokhlov.com.

The art, and heart, of the dog park

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There’s a beautiful story in today’s New York Times that should resonate with dog park frequenters everywhere.

We wrack our brains to remember the names of dogs we’ve met before, then wrack them even harder to try and remember the name of the owner, and once in a while we stumble, calling the owner by the dog’s name, or vice versa.

Dick Sebastian resolved he would not make those kind of mistakes at the small-dog run in New York City’s Washington Square Park after he became a regular there a few years ago, along with his wife Susie, and his dog, Kitty.

After a visit, Sebastian, 71 and a retired surgeon, would return home, draw illustrations of the dog’s he had met and label them with their names. Later, he started bringing his chart with him to the dog run, where new dog owners started asking if he’d include their dogs on his ever-expanding artwork.

That led to Sebastian attempting less cartoony, more serious portraiture, sketching some of the dogs he had come to know. He started with a pug named Sidney, and in less than a year, he had drawn and presented, as gifts, 50 dog portraits to their owners.

The dog park crowd appreciated Sebastian’s efforts. Said one, “The fact that someone would care enough that he’d want to draw what’s unique about your dog for you …”

Sebastian was appreciated as well for his kindness, and his interest not just in other people’s dogs, but the people themselves.

He’d become a fixture, but now he’s leaving.  Sebastian and his wife plan to move back to their native Ohio this month, so that Sebastian, who has Parkinson’s disease, can get easy access to care at a retirement home.

Times reporter Susan Dominus writes:

“New York is full of ad-hoc communities based on proximity and built up around mutual affection — walk into any watering hole at 7:30 p.m. — but they often have a live-and-let-live looseness to them. While parental oversight can stifle, en loco parentis oversight can be a rare, welcome comfort in the circles of urban life,”

 “For passionate dog people, the folks at the Washington Square Park dog run are also, it turns out, passionate people people, and there have been myriad parties scheduled in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Sebastian before they depart.”

It’s not the first time I’ve said it, and I’m not the first one to say it, but dogs — if they don’t just automatically make us better humans — certainly manage to open up the opportunities for us to be.

Dick Sebastian, it seems, recognized that — most artfully.

(Artwork: The small dogs of Washington Square Park, by Dick Sebastian)