Tag Archives: president

U of Houston president adopts campus stray

The popular president of the University of Houston became a little more popular this week with her announcement that a stray dog who had been wandering around campus had been adopted.

By her.

President Renu Khator announced on Twitter Tuesday, “To all those concerned about the stray dog on campus for a week, don’t worry. I have brought her home from BARC to foster and adopt. Her name is Ruby!” Khator wrote.

BARC is the City of Houston’s Animal Shelter and Adoption Facility and is responsible for animal control in the city.

The stray had become something of a celebrity in the week she spent wandering the campus, and some students referred to her as “Professor.”

Apparently, after the dog was taken in by BARC, Khator made arrangements to foster and eventally adopt the dog.

Khator’s followers flooded her Twitter thread, sharing their own photos, praising her generosity and calling her the ‘best president’ a university could have, the Houston Chronicle reported.

“Just another reason to love our prez,” wrote one student.

By Wednesday morning, the dog appeared to be fitting easily into her new role as an unofficial UH mascot. Khator shared photos of her sporting a Cougar-red collar embroidered with a UH logo, as they walked together.

Omarosa is Trump’s latest “dog”

omarosabookPresident Trump has once again called a person he is displeased with a “dog” — his derisive term of choice for anyone who badmouths him, and one we’ve criticized before.

Not because it’s ridiculously outdated — right up there with such vintage slurs as “Your mother wears combat boots,” as far as verbal jabs go.

Not because it is rude, not because it can be racist, not because it is vague. It can mean lazy, dishonest, or evil; it can mean an ugly woman, or a man who treats women shabbily.

It’s because it shows a total disrespect for, and misunderstanding of, dogs. He is seemingly oblivious to the esteem in which most of the public now holds dogs.

Dogs never were an accurate metaphor for bad behavior, lowly character, or dirtiness, or lying — and they certainly are not now. Fact of the matter is, humans lead the way in all those things.

But Trump nearly always falls back on “dog,” as he did this week when Omarosa Manigault Newman, his “Apprentice” contestant turned White House aide, went public with a book she has written about him and some tapes she secretly recorded.

Manigault Newman’s new book, “Unhinged: An Insider’s Account of the Trump White House,” slams the president as racist and in mental decline.

That, and her release to NBC of a 2017 audio recording, prompted Trump to take to Twitter.

“When you give a crazed, crying lowlife a break, and give her a job at the White House, I guess it just didn’t work out,” Trump wrote. “Good work by General Kelly for quickly firing that dog!”

omarosaManigualt Newman, a memorable contestant from “The Apprentice,” became a White House aide and the highest ranking black person on the White House staff before she was fired last December, reportedly for taking too much advantage of the White House car service.

In being called “a dog” by the president, she joins the ranks of Mitt Romney, Ted Cruz, NBC News journalist David Gregory, NBC’s Chuck Todd, conservative commentators Erick Erickson and Glenn Beck, Lindsey Graham, Michael Bloomberg, Marco Rubio, David Axelrod and Hillary Clinton.

This time, though, because he used it to describe a woman of color, and in light of previous derogatory remarks about African Americans — such as calling Rep. Maxine Waters “low IQ” — it’s getting a bit more of a reaction.

“The president of the United States is calling a woman of color ‘a dog.’ How dare he!” Rep. Frederica S. Wilson (D-Fla.) said during an interview on CNN. “He has taken this country to its knees.”

Of course, Trump should lighten up on all those people, but he should also lighten up on dogs, and realize they are not so universally hated as to be used as a term of derision. We won’t suggest he use “pig” or “rat” instead, because those animals deserve better too.

That Trump is not a fan of dogs has been clearly established. He’s the first president since William McKinley not to have one, and even though he seemed to like being photographed with winners of Westminster, his ex-wife Ivana noted in a memoir that he was definitely not a fan of dogs.

That’s fine (because we doubt most dogs would like him, either), but he still needs to let it sink in that most people do, and they don’t appreciate the term being hurled at his latest enemy.

Maybe, in the future, a better insult will become obvious — if not to him, at least to the public.

Maybe, 50 years from now, we’ll all be saying, “He’s lying like a Trump.”

George H. W. Bush gets a service dog

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Former President George H.W. Bush has gotten a service dog to help him with the kind of everyday tasks not easily accomplished when you are 94-years-old.

Sully H.W. Bush, a yellow Labrador, arrived at the Bush home Monday.

Sully can perform a two-page list of commands, including answering the phone and fetching items CNN reported.

“As one person said, he can do just about anything except make you a martini, but not to worry, he can go get you someone to make you a martini!” Bush spokesman Jim McGrath said.

Sully is named after Chelsea “Sully” Sullenberger III, the pilot who became famous for landing a damaged passenger jet on the Hudson River and saving all 155 passengers and crew aboard in 2009.

He was was trained by Guide Dog Foundation and America’s VetDogs, a nonprofit that provides service dogs at no cost to veterans, active-duty service members and first responders with disabilities, according to the America’s VetDogs website.

Sully already has his own Instagram account, @sullyhwbush, which has already posted its first photo. It will post daily pictures from Sully’s point of view and highlight the importance of service dogs for individuals with disabilities, according to McGrath.

The dogs are trained to help with various disabilities, including blindness or low vision, post-traumatic stress disorder and hearing loss. The group also provides facility dogs to help rehabilitate service members and veterans in military and Veterans Affairs hospitals.

Bush uses a wheelchair and has been hospitalized several times in recent months for low blood pressure and an infection that spread to his blood.

Bush also met Monday with former President Bill Clinton and congratulated him on the publication of his novel, “The President Is Missing,” written with author James Patterson.

(Photo: Twitter)

Barbara Bush stood for much, dogs included

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Barbara Bush was remembered over the weekend as a kind, strong and loyal matriarch whose advocacy for various causes touched the lives of many.

Among those were the lives of dogs — her own family’s and others, including the hundreds of thousands who have visited the dog park that bears the name of her former dog, Millie.

Mrs. Bush wrote two children’s books that featured her own family dogs.

millliesbook“Millie’s Book,” published in 1992, describes a day in the life of President George H.W. Bush and family, through their dogs eyes, including daily morning briefings, time spent in the Oval Office, and breaks in the yard to chase squirrels.

The book hit No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list.

“C. Fred’s Story,” published in 1984, detailed their Cocker Spaniel’s life as the sidekick of then-Vice President Bush.

Both books raised money towards Bush’s top human cause, literacy, with “Millie’s Book” raising over $1.1 million.

More than 1,000 mourners gathered in Texas Saturday to attend the funeral of the former first lady at the Bushes’ family church in Houston.

She had been fighting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure.

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In 2003, Harris County opened a state of the art dog park in Houston in honor of the former first lady’s English Springer Spaniel, Millie.

Millie and Mrs. Bush are said to have been the inspiration for the park, the first to open in the county. It went on to serve as a model and inspiration for other dog parks. Millie died in Kennebunkport, Maine, on May 19, 1997 at the age of about 11.

Houston locals remember Mrs. Bush as “a kind of straight-talking grandmother to the city, an approachable first lady out for a stroll in the sunshine, so genuinely earthbound that she herself picked up after her dogs at the park,” the New York Times reported.

More photos of Mrs. Bush and the Bush dogs can be seen in this PEOPLE magazine report on the former first lady’s passion for dogs.

(Photos: At top, the First Lady and Millie on the grounds of the White House in 1989, by Diana Walker; at bottom, Millie and the Lady in a 1990 photo, Associated Press)

Dog’s ear cyst resembles Donald Trump

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I’ve written before about that distinctively human tendency to see images in inanimate objects — everything from Jesus on a grilled cheese sandwich to a dog in a piece of wood.

My theory on that whole phenomenon is that we see, with only the slightest hint or suggestion, what our subconscious wants us to see, such as Abraham Lincoln in a chicken nugget; or what it fears seeing, such as Satan in a storm cloud.

But Donald Trump in a dog’s ear? I won’t attempt to explain that.

BBC reported that Jade Robinson, 25, of Jarrow, Tyneside, was photographing her beagle’s infected ear when a friend spotted the 45th president’s face in the dog’s cyst.

chiefThe dog’s name? Chief.

Robinson said she was taking the picture to pass along to her vet. Chief would have to be sedated for the vet to properly examine the ear — and she was short of the funds necessary to do that.

Amazingly enough, her photo going viral led her to launch a crowdfunding campaign, which has already raised 80 percent of its £450 goal.

Hail to the chief!

On the justgiving.com website, Robinson warns that goal amount will likely increase depending on what treatments the vet prescribes — up to and including removing the president from Chief’s ear.

Robinson said she has always made it a point to keep Chief’s ears clean, but beagles are notorious for picking up dirt, which, as we all know, can lead to infections.

“If you know anything about beagles you know how intelligent, active and curious they are and Chief certainly lives up to that – he’s full of mischief.

“As he has the very distinctive long ears, they spend a lot of time scraping the ground sniffing for lovely smells; unfortunately this leads to his ears picking up a lot of dirt.”

Robinson said she never saw Trump when she was taking the photo.

“…It was my eagle-eyed friend who pointed it out.”

Readers: Please note how I, despite my political leanings, presented that whole story without implying the current president is in any way a cyst in need of removal. Nor did I comment on how awful it would be to have Donald Trump constantly in one’s ear — mainly because, between his tweets and the news media, we already know that.

In badmouthing his human foes, Trump manages to also offend dogs everywhere

misspWhile the hotels that carry his name may be dog-friendly, President Trump is definitely not — as shown not just by his refusal to have one in the White House, but in his word choice.

Examine his insults, his verbal slaps, his testy tweets and you will find unkind references to dogs in many of them.

Newsweek did just that and concluded:

“Not only is President Donald Trump the first White House resident in generations to not have a first pooch, but the very word ‘dog’ is the root of so many of the Tweeter in Chief’s favorite insults.”

Of one of his newest rivals, Republican Sen. Bob Corker, the president recently said, “Couldn’t get elected dog catcher.”

He used the exact same term to describe former New York Governor George Pataki, former New Hampshire Governor John Sununu in 2015, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, Michael Bloomberg and Hillary Clinton.

He said he watched Marco Rubio “sweating like a dog” during his campaign.

He called former Obama administration adviser David Axelrod a dog after he criticized him on Fox News.

Among those he has said were “fired like a dog” were NBC’s David Gregory, Glenn Beck and Ted Cruz’s communications director.

Former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper both choked “like dogs” in Senate testimony in May, he told Time.

Mitt Romney, in his campaign for president, “choked like a dog,” too, in Trump’s view.

William McKinley is the last president to not have a dog, though he had other pets.

Generally, the only photos of Trump with dogs are from when he regularly invited the the winner of the Westminster Dog Show to visit his palatial Trump Tower suite, as is the case with the photo at the top of this post.

At least one citizen graciously offered him a dog, but he, quite ungraciously, snubbed the offer. By the time he informed heiress Lois Pope he didn’t want the dog, she’d already fallen in love and decided to keep it.

Further evidence of Trump’s distaste for the species — at least non-pedigreed members — can be found in a memoir, “Raising Trump,” written by his ex-wife Ivana.

“Donald was not a dog fan,” she wrote. When Ivana brought home a poodle named Chappy, to Trump’s displeasure, she said she gave him this choice — “It’s me and Chappy or no one!”

He gave in, but never showed much fondness for the poodle — and the feeling was mutual, she wrote.

In point of fact, dogs don’t sweat. In point of fact, dogs don’t lie. In point of fact, dog catcher is not an elected position — at least not in modern times. Yet he uses references to dogs, repeatedly and erroneously, as a metaphor/simile for lowly behavior, or to describe anyone he doesn’t like.

News flash, Mr. President, (of the non-fake variety): Dogs are probably held in higher regard in America than either you or the presidency.

I did not want to see Trump elected anything, least of all president. And I don’t think he’d make a good “dog catcher,” either. As experienced as he is at shoveling the you-know-what, he’d probably be good at cleaning out kennels.

But hey, he — unfortunately — has a country to run.

Finding Nemo, peeing in the fireplace

This just in — or, more accurately, out — French President Emmanuel Macron’s recently adopted black Lab mix, Nemo, left his mark on a high level meeting by peeing on the ornate palace fireplace.

Junior minister for ecology Brune Poirson had been making a point when Nemo, a two-year-old labrador-griffon cross, was caught on camera cocking a leg on the elaborate fire place at the centuries-old Elysee Palace, the official residence of the French president.

“I wondered what that noise was,” Poirson says as the meeting breaks into laughter.

The blushing President apologized for the interruption but mostly kept his composure.

Macron reportedly bought the dog from a rescue center for $380, continuing the presidential tradition of having a “first dog.”