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Tag: recovery

Saved from the lava: Rescue efforts continue as more eruptions are predicted

lava

Dogs on Hawaii’s Big Island continue to be rescued from the unpredictable flows of lava that have spewed from the Kilauea volcano since its eruption last week.

Many pets are said to have bolted away from their homes during the earthquake that preceded the eruption, and more have been lost during evacuations.

Further eruptions are being predicted in the days ahead.

“It’s a sad situation,” said Adam Pereira, the shelter manager at the Hawaiian Island Humane Society told BuzzFeed. “They had to evacuate so fast and lots of people thought they’d go back the next day.”

The Hawaii Island Humane Society combed through every street in Leilani Estates last Tuesday looking for pets still remaining in the neighborhood. It was the third mission to retrieve animals since the area was evacuated on Thursday.

The first time the humane society went into the evacuated zone on Saturday, it retrieved six dogs and two tortoises.

One woman recovered her two dogs, missing for 10 days, on Sunday, after they were found near a lava vent.

cani-eruzione-kilauea-2-281x300Carol Hosley, who was being evacuated by firemen at her Leilani Estates, said Brus, a Jack Russel-pug mix, fled the house as she was packing up her things. Little Dude, a black terrier mix, followed close behind him

Hosley adopted Brus from Aloha Ilio Rescue six months ago, and that group aided in his rescue, according to HawaiiNewsNow.com.

“We’ve been looking for him for 10 days, and we’ve just kept going back, and going back,” said Daylynn Kyles, president of Aloha Ilio Dog Rescue. Kyles, accompanied by two friends, finally found the dogs on Sunday, trapped between a cooled lava flow and a fence line.

“They were stuck behind a fence, and they couldn’t get out because the lava had surrounded them,” Kyles said. “It was crazy.”

Kyles and her companions had to crawl through the grass and over the fence line to reach the dogs who were badly shaken, and bitten by red ants.

cani-eruzione-kilauea“We just knew this dog was probably just terrified, he was truly stuck, he couldn’t get out,” Kyles said.

Kyles said they were searching near the 17th fissure, and could hear the ground rumbling.

“It sounded like a freight train. You just heard these constant, big booms.”

Brus and Little Dude are recovering at Aloha Ilio while Hosley tries to find more permanent housing.

“I’m just thrilled to death, I just couldn’t be happier,” Hosley said. “The other stuff is stuff, but I got the dogs.”

(Top photo, U.S. Geological Survey; lower photos of Brus and Little Dude, courtesy of Aloha Ilio Rescue)

Dogs help heal wounds in war-torn Uganda


Eleven years after a civil war in Uganda, many are still coping with the scars it left — inside and out — and some are finding that a dog can help them do that.

That was the case with Francis Okello Oloya, who in 2015 started The Comfort Dog Project to help people in Gulu town, especially those who were suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety.

At age 12, Okello was blinded by a bomb blast as he worked in the family garden. At a boarding school for the blind, Okello found it difficult to find the toilet at night.

“I had to navigate my way from the sleeping quarter to latrine and that was not easy,” he told the Voice of America. “And these dogs came to know that I needed help. And they began the practice of helping me from the sleeping quarters to the latrine.”

Now 29, he’s in charge of a program that matches street dogs with war’s victims, providing comfort to those victims, homes for those street mutts, and adding to a growing recognition in Uganda of what dogs are capable of.

Traditionally, dogs have mainly been used for hunting in Uganda, or for security.

The Comfort Dog Project is an offshoot of Big Fix Uganda, a nonprofit working to improve the lives of dogs and people in the impoverished and war-torn country.

As explained on the Comfort Dogs website, dogs in need of homes are rehabilitated by a team of trainers, temperament tested and spayed/neutered. They are then placed with war trauma survivors who agree to care for the dog for its lifetime and go through a week of training.

uganda2After graduating, the dog-guardian teams become project ambassadors — visiting villages and schools to
educate others about the importance of being kind to animals, teach them to use positive reinforcement training techniques and “serve as testimony of the healing power of human-dog bonds.”

In the aftermath of the civil war in Uganda, tens of thousands of people still struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder and mental health practitioners estimate that seven in 10 people in Northern Uganda were traumatically affected.

Philda Akum, 35, is one of the 29 beneficiaries of the project, Voice of America reports.

In 1997, she and her four brothers were abducted by those rebelling against the government and taken to Sudan.

One brother was captured and killed, Akum says. Another brother was selected to go to the battlefront and was fatally shot. Two days later, her youngest brother contracted cholera and died.

She returned home and joined group therapy, which is what led her to be assigned a dog.

The Big Fix operates the only veterinary hospital in northern Uganda and works to achieve a sustainable population of dogs and cats and control the spread of rabies and other diseases.

(Photo: Francis Okello Oloya, founder of The Comfort Dog Project, with Binongo; Philda Akum, a former war victim, with her dog; by H. Athumani, Voice of America)

Cola gets his fizz back

A dog that had his legs hacked off in Thailand is making great strides on his continuing road to recovery.

Cola’s front legs were sliced off with a sword by a neighbor in Bangkok angry over the dog chewing his shoes.

He was later adopted by John Dalley and his wife, who run the Soi Dog Foundation.

He received his first set of prosthetics about a year ago, but recently was fitted with the types used by paralympic runners.

The Soi Dog Foundation, an animal welfare group based on the resort island of Phuket, brought in a human surgeon to fit Cola with the high tech carbon fiber racing blades.

Now, Dalley reports, Cola is bounding on the beach with the rest of his pack, and he has no fear or distrust of humans despite what happened to him.

“It’s actually quite amazing how adaptable dogs are and how forgiving they are,” he said.

You can learn more about Cola’s inspirational recovery in this Reuters report.

Jinjja comes home and meets — through the fence gate — his feline double

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On his first full day back home, Jinjja and I were sitting in my courtyard when he suddenly began whimpering, trotting back and forth and looking out between the slats in the fence.

I put down my coffee, looked between the slats and saw an eyeball looking in at us.

Further investigation revealed a second eyeball, and an entire cat — just calmly sitting there, inches from the fence gate, looking in.

It was Jinjja’s feline doppelganger.

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We’ve come across him (or her) before on walks. He (or she) has the exact same color coat as Jinjja. A couple of times we’ve tried to approach him (or her), but Jinjja’s excitement scares him (or her) off.

He (or she) is one of two cats that roam the neighborhood, though I’m pretty sure they both have owners. The other is a Siamese. Frequently I spot one or the other from my kitchen window, where they both like to hunt every morning in the ground cover of a nearby bank, likely for chipmunks.

That involves laying in wait, perfectly still, on their bellies, sometimes rising up on their hind legs, like meerkats, to get a better view of what might be jumping around in the juniper.

Given his or her standoffishness, I was surprised to see Jinjja’s feline twin right outside the fence gate, seeming entirely curious and not at all frightened. To the contrary, it was almost like he/she was waiting for someone to open the gate.

Jinjja continued to whimper and put his nose right up to the gate, sniffing between the slats. The cat didn’t budge.

Several neighbors have commented on the resemblance between the white-yellow cat and my dog. They see him/her in the distance and think “uh oh, Jinjja escaped again.” While Jinjja was staying with a friend — for nearly a month and a half as I recuperated from some surgery — seeing the cat always reminded me of him.

DSC06547 (2)

Given he/she has never let me get too close, his/her appearance right outside the gate on Jinjja’s first full day back home seemed like it must be fraught with meaning. I just wasn’t sure what it was.

Maybe it was a connection between fellow chipmunk hunters. Jinjja did plenty of that while he was away, enjoying a friend’s spacious back yard and the company of their two dogs. On his last day, they teamed up to almost corner one.

Maybe chipmunks became more common in and around my little courtyard while Jinjja was away, and the cat had figured out it was prime hunting ground.

Or maybe he/she saw it as an opportunity to finally — and safely — meet the dog whose striking coat he/she had admired from afar.

Perhaps it was simply a “welcome home” from a fellow fluffy, white-yellow denizen of the neighborhood.

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Maybe, if Jinjja doesn’t tug on the leash too much upon seeing him/her — I’m not quite ready for that yet — we can try for an up close meeting with his doppelganger in the days ahead.

Or maybe he/she will be back for more bonding from opposite sides of the fence slats.

When you’re feeling way older than your dog

I’m still a few days away from reclaiming my dog Jinjja, being cared for by a friend while I recover from some recent surgery, but I did stop by to take him for a test walk last week.

(That’s not us in the video above. I’m not quite that slow and bent over, and Jinjja’s not quite as willing as that dachshund to move along at a snail’s pace.

The test walk convinced me I needed a few more days — given Jinjja tugs a bit on the leash — before getting back to the two walks a day routine.

Then I came across the video above, which made me think if that old guy can still walk his dog, a little wrenching of my guts shouldn’t be holding me back. I’m not sure which impressed me more — the old man’s perseverance or the dog’s patience.

Still, given Jinjja’s hosts are so gracious and he seems to be having such a good time there — enjoying a large, escape-proof yard, the companionship of two other dogs and attention from three times as many humans — I decided to stretch his visit out to a few more days and pick him up after the holidays.

Yes, dogs help keep us young, but sometimes they can remind us how old we’re getting, or feeling — especially when a walk is the last thing you feel like doing and your dog is insisting on it. The video also got me thinking about dogs and older people, and how a good match is pretty vital to their successful coexistence.

jin2When I adopted Jinjja six months ago, after he was freed from a South Korean farm where he was being raised to become meat, I was in decent health and thought I had enough energy to handle whatever challenges he might pose.

His three escapes and the subsequent recovery efforts — one on the eve of my surgery — made me question that … and more.

Should I, at almost 64, have chosen a smaller, lazier, older dog to adopt — one content to do little more than lay around the house, one for whom my tiny courtyard would be ample space?

In retrospect, yes. But I didn’t know at the time that I was going to have to deal with a kidney cancer scare and a surgery that takes six weeks to recover from.

I’m far from alone in having this kind of issue. Even though dogs age much more quickly than we do, it’s not uncommon for older folks to find the dog they’ve been caring for has become more than they can handle, or for them to adopt one who might not be a perfect fit for their circumstances.

I’m a firm believer that a dog can bring joy, meaning, comfort, companionship and numerous health benefits to the life of an older person — and that ideally every older person who wants one should have one.

But, as with any adoption, considerations of one’s circumstances, and the possibility of unforeseen new ones, need to be kept in mind.

You can find a pretty good summary of all the pros and cons when it comes to pets and seniors in this guide put together by the National Council on Aging Care.

It was a dog who led me to the home I bought a year ago — a different dog (Ace) who died before I moved. He needed a home without steps. He was not a leash-tugger, or even a leash-requirer, and he was content to always be at my side.

The condo seemed a perfect old man/old dog house. It didn’t have anything that could rightly be called a yard, but it had no steps (which I’ll admit appealed to me as well) and it had a small fenced courtyard.

Ace — while he was an extra large dog — never seemed too thrilled with yards, anyway. He would rather go on walks and meet people, or lay on the porch and wait for people to come meet him, or simply station himself at some other observation point:

At dog parks, Ace, a highly social animal, would generally remain where the people were, rather than romp around the acreage.

Jinjja is a different story — and one that’s still evolving. He’s still working on his socialization skills, and more. We attended our first obedience class, where he showed great promise, but attending those classes was cut short by my illness.

Jinjja is still easily frightened, and wary of the male of the human species. He was at my friend’s house for a month before he let her husband pet him.

Their place was an ideal spot for him. He can just go out the back door and have an entire yard to romp in. There’s no need for leashed walks, and thereby fewer opportunities for him to take off — and when he does that, getting him back is no easy task.

DSC05631I’ve concluded that’s a result of both nature and nurture — though the environment he came from could hardly be called nurturing.

It is fairly characteristic of his breed (Jindo) to wander. And contact with humans was best avoided at the dog farm in South Korea where — though he might have been someone’s pet at some point — he was mostly raised.

So for this particular old person (for whom moving into a house with a large escape proof fenced yard is out of the question), it’s a matter of more training, more trust-building, more work, more walks, more trips to the dog park, and more of the kind of perseverance that old man in the video reflects.

And all that will resume by this weekend.

Why? Because of all the rewards we’ve only briefly touched on in this article. You — whether you are young, or old, or in between — already know what they are. I’ve been reminded of them when Jinjja, who once kept his distance from me, joyfully greets me during my visits to his temporary home.

We’ve got more bonding to do, more tricks to learn, more walks to take. He’ll have to slow down a bit. I’ll have to stay upright and pick up the pace. But, as a team, I’m pretty sure we can do it.

(Click on this link for more stories about Jinjja)

Outlook good for guide dog who tried to shield blind woman from oncoming bus

figo

An anonymous benefactor has come forward to pay the veterinary bill for Figo, the 8-year-old guide dog dog who leapt in front of a school minibus Monday to shield his blind handler.

Figo (pronounced “FEE-go”) suffered trauma, tissue damage and a slight break to his right front leg when he stepped in between Audrey Stone and an oncoming bus Monday in Brewster, New York.

Hopes are high that he will make a full recovery.

The dog was walking on Stone’s right side but switched sides and jumped between Stone and the vehicle, witnesses said.

Stone, 62, broke an ankle, ribs and an elbow and has a head wound. She is being treated in a Danbury, Connecticut, hospital, where she told The Journal News on Tuesday that Figo “deserves the Purple Heart” for his actions.

Dr. Angela O’Donnell of Middlebranch Veterinary said Figo came out of surgery well, and is now receiving pain medication and antibiotics. His fractured leg could take up to six weeks to mend.

“He’s doing really, really well,” O’Donnell said Wednesday. “I have no concerns at this point about a long-term issue for him.”

The decision on whether Figo will be able to resume serving as Stone’s guide dog will be made by the Guide Dog Foundation, which provided Stone with the dog.

Andrew Rubinstein, marketing director for the foundation, said that once Stone and Figo are home, a trainer will visit them for an assessment.

“Once they’re well enough, the work of the team will be assessed by one of our certified trainers,” Rubenstein said. “Is Figo a little timid around traffic? Is he scared to be around traffic? Or is he ready to go back full-time?”

“If the dog is a little timid, we’d talk with Audrey about maybe retiring Figo and maybe coming back to the foundation to get a new dog,” Rubenstein said. “Or if the dog feels good and works well in traffic and doing their typical routes, they might need a refresher to get all their skills fine-tuned again.”

(Photo: Middlebranch Veterinary)

Amazing feet: Pawless dog in Colorado gets around on four prosthetic legs

A dog in Colorado is learning to get around on four prosthetic paws.

Brutus, a two-year-old Rottweiler, lost all four paws after suffering frostbite, and the amputations are said to have been performed by the breeder who owned him.

Last September, after being taken in by a foster mother, he was outfitted with two rear paws, followed a couple of months later by two prosthetic front paws.

While his gait may still look a little awkward, the prosthetics — made by OrthoPets of Denver — have enabled him to get around outside.

“It’s not always pretty. We want to be able to give him a higher function, where he can run and play with other dogs, go on hikes,” foster mom Laura Aquilina, of Loveland, told KDVR.

Brutus is reported to be only the second dog ever known to have four prosthetic limbs.

“Brutus is an amazing case of a beautiful dog who was dealt a short hand, said Martin Kauffman, founder of OrthoPets. “He can get out and do normal doggy things. And it just makes you feel so good.”

The company makes prosthetics for about 250 animals worldwide a year.