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Tag: reunited

Stolen pug reunites with owner

Guido the pug was reunited with his owner in Florida on July 4, more than a month after he was stolen.

The dog was inside the car of his owner, Donald Murray, of Lutz, when it was stolen May 29.

Since then Murray has been desperately trying to find him.

Murray’s car was found abandoned behind a grocery store, and an employee at a dry-cleaning business found Guido wandering around. Another employee there, Karlene Rowell, took Guido home and cared for him.

According to WPTV in Palm Beach, the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office received an anonymous Crime Stoppers tip about the dog that led detectives to the dog’s whereabouts.

When a tip came in, investigators took Murray to Rowell’s house on Tuesday night. He confirmed the dog was Guido.

A sheriff’s spokesman said Rowell and her family were sad to say goodbye, but happy Guido was reunited with Murray.

The sheriff’s office released video of the reunion on Twitter.

Chloe 2.0: Woman adopts the dog that her family surrendered when she was a child

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When a Pennsylvania woman saw a pomeranian-poodle mix up for adoption in a Facebook post, the dog reminded her so much of her childhood dog that she decided to look into adopting her.

That’s when she found out it was her childhood dog.

Nicole Grimes said the photo of her dog, reminded of her beloved childhood puppy, named Chloe, who her family surrendered to a shelter seven years ago because she was too “yappy.”

It was until she met the 11-year-old dog, also named Chloe, that she began suspecting the new Chloe might also be the old Chloe.

The dog bounded over to her and began licking her face.

“Then I knew in my heart that she had to be the same dog,” Grimes told the BBC.

Grimes husband was skeptical, but a check of the dog’s microchip determined it was the same Chloe.

grimes2“We couldn’t believe it. It’s just crazy,” Grimes said.

Grimes got Chloe on her tenth birthday — a gift from her grandmother.

Four years later, though, after her father began working at home, he found the dog was too loud. Grimes remembers the day her dad picked her up from school with the dog in the back seat and they drove to the shelter.

Grimes said Chloe is toothless now, but “still loves to run around” and spend time with her four-month-old daughter, Violet.

“They love to play with each other. Chloe is very gentle with Violet and it warms my heart to see them together.”

(Photos: At top, Grimes with Chloe then and with Chloe now; Chloe with Grimes’ daughter, Violet; courtesy of family, via BBC)

After 38 years in prison, innocent man freed — and gets to bring his dog home, too

At first glance this story made no sense — a man who spent the past 38 years in prison wins his freedom when his innocence is finally proven and is reunited with his dog.

No dog — no matter how loyal to his owner — lives that long.

Turns out though, that Malcolm Alexander came into possession of the dog while serving his sentence at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola, a facility which, while it has a reputation as a tough place, offers several dog programs and even breeds its own guard dogs.

Alexander, 58, had been proclaiming his innocence since he was convicted of sexual assault and sent to prison at age 20.

On Tuesday, he was welcomed home by his 82-year-old mother, his son and his grandson – both named Malcolm, and other relatives.

Earlier in the day, A Jefferson Parish judge vacated Alexander’s 1980 aggravated rape conviction and his mandatory life sentence after finding that Alexander had not been provided with adequate legal assistance, and that DNA evidence discovered in 2013 excluded Alexander as a suspect in the sexual assault.

After the ruling, Alexander did not return to the prison, where both his belongings and his dog remained.

innocenceThe next day, he was reunited with the huge black Lab, Nola.com reported.

“You ain’t got nothing to worry about no more,” he told the 9-month-old pup upon reuniting with him. “I told you we gonna be free. I told you they was gonna get us out.”

Alexander’s case was undertaken by The Innocence Project, which helped him gain his freedom.

Alexander had raised the dog since shortly after his birth. He named the dog Innocence, and calls him Inn for short.

Inn was born at the prison to another dog at the facility, according to Vanessa Potkin, an attorney with The Innocence Project.

Potkin and other staffers traveled to Angola Wednesday to retrieve Inn and Alexander’s property and return them to Alexander.

(Photo: Michelle Hunter \ NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)

Bemis and Kelly together again

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A former Army medic flew from California to North Carolina last weekend to reclaim the dog she lost more than six years ago.

Kelly Accettola reunited with her Italian greyhound, Bemis, on Saturday, according to the Gaston Gazette.

Accettola flew from San Diego, where she now lives, to Charlotte to get the dog that went missing while she lived in Norfolk, Virginia.

It’s unknown what happened with Bemis during the six years he was missing, but somehow he ended up 300 miles from Norfolk.

He was spotted on the streets of Gastonia by Tracy Tucker as she drove to work and taken to Wilkinson Animal Hospital.

“I opened up the car door and he just hopped right on in,” said Tucker, who says she often rescues and fosters animals in the area. “Right after work we came here and found his chip and everything.”

Accettola was notified last week that Bemis had been found.

Bemis is in good shape, but needs about $1,200 worth of dental work.

To help pay for her travel and veterinarian bills, Accettola started a Go Fund Me page, which has raised $575.

According to the Gazette, American Kennel Club Reunite, a Raleigh-based organization which helps connect lost animals with their owners each day, matched his microchip to an address in Sacramento, California — Kelly’s mother-in-law’s home.

The American Kennel Club has offered to pay for all of Bemis’ veterinary bills, the newspaper reported.

Bemis disappeared after being let out into the back yard one night, Accettola said. “I went out to the backyard to see what was going on and sure enough he wasn’t there. It was just like he vanished without a trace,” she said.

She adopted the dog about nine years ago while living in upstate New York with her husband, Donavon Both were in the military, Kelly was a combat medic in the Army and Donavon was a nuclear engineer in the Navy.

Upon reuniting with her dog, Accettola cried: “Oh, my gosh, Bemis. Hi sweetheart. You look just the same.”

“You know, you hear these miracle stories about people who get their missing pets back after years apart and you think, ‘That’ll never happen to me,'” she said later. “But my God, it has.”

(Photo: NBC26, Scripps Media, Inc.)

Feel-good story about homeless man’s reunion with dog took some strange turns

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Getting your Huntsvilles confused is one thing, but one website really screwed the pooch when they published a story about a good Samaritan who helped reunite a homeless man and his dog.

In September, in Huntsville, TEXAS, Wilma Price was driving through a Walmart parking lot when she saw a homeless man holding a sign that said, “Dog in pound. Need help.”

Price, who runs a rescue called Mr. K’s Pet Shelter, stopped to find out his story. She learned the homeless man, named Patrick, had been arrested and jailed for trespassing, and that, because of that, his dog ended up in the animal shelter.

She took Patrick to the shelter, and paid the $120 necessary for him to get his dog — named Franklin — back.

The story was picked up by the website Life with Dogs, CBS News, People.com and many more.

Dozens of other websites reprinted or rewrote it — most of them doing a decent job of passing along the facts.

Then there was the Alabama Observer.

patrick2It reported that the story took place in Huntsville, Alabama, that the dog’s name was Wilbur, that the homeless man’s name was Mark Spencer, and that the good Samaritan’s name was Elizabeth Masterson.

The story had no links to actual news sources, and little attribution.

It wasn’t the only website to get the facts askew, but it was the only one that appeared to be making up entirely new names for everyone involved. At least three other websites published versions of the story with those erroneous names.

One wonders what might be the motivation for substituting illegitimate names into a legitimate story.

Might the exact same story have happened with different people at a Walmart in Huntsville, Alabama? Clearly not. Might the website be trying to cover its rear, legally? Maybe. Might there be something more nefarious going on, such as diverting donations intended for Patrick (whose last name isn’t Spencer) to some guy named Mark Spencer? We hope not. Might a computer program be doing the website’s writing? Highly possible.

Apparently, a bogus Go Fund Me campaign to raise funds for Patrick was launched by someone neither Wilma nor Patrick knew, and, using photos from Wilma’s Facebook page, it raised $3,000 before the page was removed from Go Fund Me.

That’s $3,000 Patrick and Franklin didn’t get. Wilma Price, meanwhile, started a campaign for him too, and it has raised more than $15,000 for Patrick on GoFundMe.

Price said Patrick has been helping her organization with rescue efforts since the two met, and her Facebook page documents their adventures together.

Snopes.com looked into the story and couldn’t figure out how or why the Alabama Observer version had new names inserted into it.

There is no contact information on the Alabama Observer’s web site, and no description of who operates it. Snopes reported it appears to accept stories submitted by users, as opposed to having its own reporters or freelancers.

We think there’s a good possibility it’s one of those websites that runs news stories through computer programs that rewrite them (with mixed results, or should I say “stirred outcomes?”).

How else could you explain the opening of this recent Alabama Observer story about clown sightings in Ohio?

“The developing rash of reported dangers including clown-faced villains has law authorization offices crosswise over Ohio and somewhere else attempting to recognize true blue dangers while cautioning deceptions are no giggling matter.”

(Photos courtesy of Wilma Price)

Dog reunited with his Syrian refugee family

A family who fled from Aleppo after a missile hit their home has been reunited with the dog they had to leave behind.

The reunion in Montreal, where the family now lives, came after a family member sent an email to SPCA International seeking help.

“I left Syria urgently with my mom and my brother, but we left our lovely dog, Fox, in Aleppo, Syria. We left him with our dad in a very dangerous area named Syrian El-Jadideh. Please help us bring our Fox [to Montreal]. Mom [is] always crying. She is extremely worried about Fox.”

In addition to the disabled father, an elderly grandmother and the dog remained in Syria when the mother and her two sons left the country, not long after a missile struck their home in 2015.

Fox was taken from Aleppo to Damascus and across the border to Lebanon by car, before being flown to Germany, and finally to Canada’s Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport on Sept. 26, where his family was waiting for him.

“It was a great feeling seeing Fox again. He was in our thoughts for so long and it felt like something was missing,” said Gaby Andrawos, one of the sons. “It felt like a very important part of our lives was missing for a long time and we finally got him back.”

A happy reunion at Marin Humane Society

After realizing a surrendered dog had recently given birth, staff at the Marin Humane Society in California contacted the dog’s former owner and asked about the pups.

The owner was “evasive” and “unwilling,” but eventually admitted there were pups and agreed — in the interest of the puppies’ health — to surrender them to the Humane Society as well.

That’s what led to this joyful reunion at the shelter on Monday.

The shelter says that when the mother dog, named Cora, was taken in for a routine check-up, vets found that she had recently had puppies — so recently they became concerned about the health of the puppies.

The Humane Society captured the reunion on video.

The puppies have been named Carson, Branson, Moseley, and Edith, all in honor of Downton Abbey characters.