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Tag: river

Crated dog was placed in bay to get revenge on rival boyfriend, prosecutors say

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The man charged with leaving a pit bull mix in a cage to drown in the Sandy Hook Bay was trying to get revenge on a romantic rival, prosecutors say.

Aaron Davis, 34, is being held without bail pending trial on third-degree charges of animal cruelty and disorderly persons charges.

A judge in Monmouth County Courthouse Monday sided with the state in its bid to deny bail and keep Davis behind bars until he is tried in the case, the Asbury Park Press reported.

The dog was discovered and rescued before the tide came in July 30 by a woman who had been walking her own dog at Veterans Memorial Park in Highlands, N.J.

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During a hearing Monday in Superior Court in Freehold Borough, prosecutors revealed that the dog — actually named Blaze — belonged to the ex-boyfriend of Davis’ girlfriend. The woman has children by both men.

The prosecutor said that the ex-boyfriend, Benito Williams, tried to break into the woman’s home but Davis stopped him and a fight ensued. Davis acted with “malice and depravity” to eliminate an “emblem of his enemy,” a prosecutor said.

Davis’ attorney, Adamo Ferreira of Hackensack, argued that the charges would likely result in probation in the event of a conviction and that the state’s case was “paper thin.”

Jennifer Vaz, who rescued the dog and named him River, has been fostering the dog.

She had planned to adopt him, but announced this week that she would be turning the dog over to the Monmouth County SPCA because her own dog has not taken well to the new dog.

Ross Licitra, executive director of the Monmouth County SPCA, said the dog will not be returned to the original owner.

(Photos: Asbury Park Press)

She plans to adopt dog she saved from bay

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The New Jersey woman who rescued a 1-year-old pit bull from drowning in a crate is planning to adopt the dog.

Jennifer Vaz was walking her dog Molly to see the sunrise at Sandy Hook Bay when she heard a dog’s whimpers coming from the waterside of the rock bulkhead.

“Molly was noticing something and wanted to take me off the trail,” she told CBS News. “When I looked down in the water, I saw River and I saw his little black eyes looking back at me.”

The dog was in a black wire crate, and the tide was coming in.

Vaz climbed over the wall to save the dog, now named River.

Her own dog followed.

“Molly actually followed me and assisted me,” Vaz said. “She went into the crate and licked him and he followed her.”

Officials said the cage was on a small portion of land between the bulkhead and water – and at the time of the rescue around 6:15 a.m., water had already reached the cage.

River was taken to the Highlands Police Department, which notified animal control. When animal control team arrived at the bayfront scene a few hours later, the cage was almost covered by the rising tide.

In a Facebook post, the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office announced it was seeking help in finding the person responsible for leaving the dog in black wire cage in Veterans Memorial Park.

Anyone with information about River is asked to call the Animal Cruelty Hot Line at 877-898-7297 or Highlands police at 732-872-1224.

The Monmouth County SPCA says River is in good condition.

Once she is cleared for adoption, Vaz hopes to adopt her. Meanwhile, she will foster her.

“It just feels like the right thing to do,” said Vaz, who picked him up Wednesday. “He feels like he’s part of our family.”

What’s turning dogs blue in Mumbai?

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The Mumbai Blue Dogs may sound like a minor league baseball team, but they are real dogs who, thanks to chemicals dumped in a river in India, are really turning blue.

“Handfuls” of blue dogs — all strays — are appearing on the streets of Mumbai, local animal advocates report.

While we can’t vouch for how authentic these photos are, or if they’ve been doctored, we can confirm that the news is real.

Jayavant Hajare, an officer with the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board told the Hindustan Times that five to six dogs entered an area along the Kasadi River that was cordoned off to the public and emerged with a blue cast to their fur.

Industrial waste is regularly dumped into the river in Mumbai, whose waters have long been deemed unfit for human consumption, but the latest surge in blue dog sightings has prompted animal advocates to urge the government to take action against companies.

The pollution control board says it is investigating.

“Allowing the discharge of dye into any water body is illegal. We will take action against the polluters as they are destroying the environment,” a spokesman said.

The spokesman said one company, which uses a blue dye to make laundry detergent, has been given seven days notice to cease dumping the pollutant into the river.

Studies quoted in local newspapers show pollution levels in the area — home to nearly a thousand pharmaceutical, food and engineering factories — have risen to 13 times the “safe limit.”

Last week, animal advocates officers took pictures of stray dogs who had turned blue and forwarded them to the pollution control board.

bluedog3(News reports don’t indicate the original source of the photo above, or the one at left, so it’s not clear if they are photos supplied by the animal protection group. At least one news organization describe the photo at top as a “representational image.”)

“It was shocking to see how the dog’s white fur had turned completely blue,” said Arati Chauhan, with the animal protection group. “We have spotted almost five such dogs here and have asked the pollution control board to act against such industries.”

“We have only spotted blue dogs so far. We do not know if birds, reptiles and other creatures are affected or if they have even died owing to the dye discharged into the air,” said Chauhan.

A flurry of news reports has called attention to the blue dogs in recent days, but they are not a new phenomenon.

Here’s a photo that appeared in a 2013 entry on this travel blog. It was taken on what’s known as Blue Dog Street.

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Police believe animal lover died trying to rescue lost poodle

watts2An Indianapolis woman found dead on a river sandbar Saturday may have died while trying to help catch a lost dog

Police and witnesses say Jacqueline “Jackie” Watts, 33, was found in the Flatrock River, where she was last seen chasing a poodle who had gone missing a few days earlier.

The poodle, named Ringo, was also found dead along the river.

Watts dropped her own pets off with a friend in Columbus Friday in preparation for a trip to Washington. Likely, she spotted the missing dog on her way home.

Her car was found with its flashers on and her purse inside, leading to a search of the area along the river.

Crews found her body Saturday morning on a sandbar in the Flatrock River in Columbus, just north of Noblitt Park.

Police say they don’t suspect foul play.

An autopsy completed Monday established that the cause of death was accidental drowning, according to the Bartholomew County Coroner’s Office.

The family of Ringo had posted on social media about his disappearance. They said the poodle had cataracts and was almost deaf.

After finding the body of Watts, police found the body of a small white dog on the river’s banks, just south of Noblitt Park. Police confirmed that it was Ringo with the animal’s owners, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Watts, an esthetician, served as teaching assistant in Indianapolis Public Schools and was known as an animal lover.

“The bottom line is we lost a very special person,” said Columbus Police Lt. Matt Harris. “It’s my understanding that Jackie was the type of person that when there was an animal that was sick, she would take that animal in and provide hospice care… That she was trying to help a lost dog and sadly appears (to have) lost her life doing so, that doesn’t seem out of character for her.”

Family members says she fostered dogs and rabbits. She volunteered with Kentuckiana Boxer Rescue and Indy Claw Animal Rescue.

“She cared deeply about the well-being of animals. If she believed she could help an animal in need, she was going to do so without hesitation,” the family said in a statement. “We know that Jackie gave her life for what she believed in.”

Chilling out with some golden retrievers

Finding the heat a little oppressive?

This video is guaranteed to cool you down, refresh your soul if you’re a dog lover, and fill you with joy if you’ve got a soft spot for golden retrievers.

Kim Sirett, a dog walker in Nanaimo, on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, took a dozen of her clients dogs and her own golden to the Nainamo River for a swim day earlier this month.

“I grew up with Golden Retrievers and they are all about swimming. If I have five of them on a hike, they congregate at the water and just stare at me to throw a stick,” said Sirett, who operates Pooch Pack Adventures.

“I just thought it would be such an easy, fun day if I had only Golden Retrievers on my hike — all my troubles would go away.”

It’s the fifth year she has organized an annual swim for the dogs, and the largest one so far, according to the Vancouver Sun

She loaded the retrievers, and one yellow Lab, into her van, drove to the river and released them.

Sirett, who specializes in 2-hour off-leash adventure hikes, worked as an executive in the pet industry for 10 years before ditching that job and becoming a dog walker.

She posted a video of the special adventure on YouTube this week.

If you’re impressed with how she leash-lessly controlled a dozen dogs, check out what she did last year:

To raise awareness for victims of domestic violence, she organized “40 Dogs on a Log for a Cause.”

More than $3,000 was raised for Haven Pets and Families. The program helps pay for the care of pets whose owners are afraid to leave abusive situations and seek shelter because they would have to leave their pets behind.

Ecuadorian stray becomes global celebrity after bonding with adventure racing team

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That Ecuadorian street dog who befriended a Swedish adventure racing team after they tossed him a meatball is an official resident of Sweden now.

Arthur, as the team named him, followed the extreme racers for the last 50 or so miles of the 430-mile race — slogging through mud, traipsing through jungle growth, climbing up mountainsides and at one point, after race officials advised the team to leave the dog behind, plunging into a river and swimming alongside their kayaks.

The team had stopped to eat before the final two stages of the race when member Mikael Lindnord noticed the scruffy yellow stray and tossed him a meatball from the can he was eating from.

It was a simple, nonchalant gesture — one Lindnord said he didn’t think too much of at the time.

Clearly, though, Arthur did.

When the four-member team finished lunch and resumed the race — beginning a 24-mile hike through the rainforest — Arthur, named after the legendary King Arthur, got up and followed.

Adventure Racing is a form of extreme sport that combines continuous hiking, trekking, mountain biking and kayaking.

At a checkpoint before the final segment of the race — a 36-mile stretch of river — race organizers warned the team that taking Arthur along was inadvisable and posed a risk to both the dog’s safety and their’s.

Team members agreed to push on without him, but after their kayaks pulled away Arthur jumped into the river, caught up with them and swam alongside.

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When Lindnord saw the dog was struggling to keep up, he pulled Arthur aboard.

Spectators standing on shore applauded.

By the end of the race, Lindnord said he had decided to try and adopt the dog and take him back to Sweden.

He admitted in a Daily Mail article that Arthur — due to living a harsh life on the streets — was in pretty bad shape even before accompanying the team on the last two legs of the race.

Once the race was over, Arthur was taken to a vet in Ecuador, and Lindnor applied to Sweden’s board of agriculture, or Jordbruksverket for permission to bring Arthur home. Arthur had already become a media star by then.

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“I almost cried in front of the computer, when receiving the decision from in Sweden,” Lindnord wrote on the Facebook page of Team Peak Performance.

They flew home together this week.

“I came to Ecuador to win the World Championship,” he said. “Instead, I got a new friend.”

(Photos: Krister Göransson)

Smiles bloom when River rolls through town

Here’s a sweet little story out of Albany, Minnesota, where a dog named River — described as part pointer, part “Walmart greeter” — serves as both friend and inspiration to many in the small town.

River lost the use of his hind legs after being attacked by two larger dogs while out on a walk.

But he has persevered, and — aided by a set of wheels — he’s enjoying his walks as much, if not more, than he ever did, his owners say.

Carol Mader says River seems more concerned about the people around him since his injury.

“He pulls out the people, I think, that are hurting.” she told KARE11. “It’s just like he senses they need attention.”

“He has no use of the back legs at all,” says her husband, Herby. “Probably a lot of dogs would give up, you know, where he’s not.”

River’s veterinarian Dr. Wendy Womack calls the 11-year-old dog “a regular icon” in Albany, a town of about 2,600.

The Maders take River for walks four or five times a day, during which he makes new friends and revisits old ones.

“…I always see him every day, twice a day, three times.” says Ron Koczur, who lost a leg to diabetes and greets River from his wheelchair. “Even though he’s lost of a couple limbs, he’s still happy and proud.”