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Tag: seinfeld

Sweet idea: Turning a dresser into a dog bed

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This reminds me of the Seinfeld episode in which Kramer turned a large dresser into lodgings for visiting Japanese tourists.

But I doubt that was the inspiration for “Sheltie Shacks” — the personalized dog beds that Kaylee Robertson, an emergency medical technician from Shetland, Scotland, makes out of old dressers.

kayleeRobertson, who lives on a small island off the coast of Scotland with seven dogs, makes no money from the past-time, paying for materials herself and contributing all profits to animal charities.

She said she likes to “provide pets with their own little safe haven that they can sleep happy in.”

“Let’s be honest, your typical dog bed is pretty ugly!” Robertson, 27, told ABC News in an email. “They’re normally these limp, dull, lifeless, smelly things that just lie in the corner. My hope is that by providing a bed which is also a piece of furniture, the dog is introduced more into the living area.”

Unlike Kramer’s tourist lodgings, I think this one has a future:

Robertson said she makes only about 30 a year because she doesn’t want to “shove something shoddy together.” She ships anywhere in the world.

Each one is custom-made and personalized, using information provided by the owner. She contacts the buyers to find what they’d like — from the paint color and wallpaper inside to the kind of knobs.

dresserbed3Every bed is completely deconstructed, sanded down and re-backed, then give several coats of paint in a design of the customer’s choosing.

“This should be something that lasts, and more importantly, a piece that people are happy to display as the centerpiece of the room,” she said.

Working on the projects allow her to clear her head after “some pretty horrific days” as an emergency medical technician. And that, she adds, is more important than money.

“Yeah sure, I’m not driving around in a Ferrari and I don’t have my own private jet, but we’re OK,” she said. “We have a roof over our heads, food in the fridge and a comfortable bed to lie in, and that does us fine!”

Don’t expect her to jump on your order right away. Recent publicity has nearly smothered her with requests.

“A couple of weeks ago I made a particularly nice bed, it even had top drawers in it, so I put a video of it on Facebook.” It quickly garnered more than 2 million views and led to hundreds of emails.

In the face of all that, Robertson might be tempted to cash in, but I doubt it.

“My gain is in the thought that when I press that “donate” button on our charities’ websites, that some wee soul will be given the lifesaving treatment they need to get better. No amount of money in my back pocket can beat that feeling.”

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(Photos: From the Sheltie Shacks Facebook page)

Masters of their dog name: Seinfeld lives on

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Seinfeld lives on in more than just reruns.

And if you don’t believe me, just take a look at some of the dog news in recent weeks.

Up in Alaska, on Tuesday, a sled dog named George Costanza led his team to victory in the Yukon Quest.

Down in South Africa, a dog surrendered by an owner who found him “yucky” has found a new home with a TV producer who renamed him Newman.

And in California, a missing therapy dog named Kramer was reunited with his owner after he went missing two months ago.

That’s quite a run (or rerun) of dogs with Seinfeld-related names making the news — and proof that good TV shows, like our memory of good dogs, never fade away.

George Costanza, an 8-year-old, is “a bit of a ham,” winning musher Hugh Neff told the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner after the 1,000-mile race.

Neff finished the race in 9 days, 1 hour and 25 minutes on the trail — the fourth fastest time in race history — even though George Costanza got distracted near the finish line and stopped to lead the team over to meet a local dog on the sidelines.

newmanNewman, as he’s now known, was dropped off at a vet’s office in Overburg by owners who asked that he be put down.

But things got so busy at the office that day the vet didn’t have time to do it, and the vet’s secretary called a rescue group in an effort to save the corgi mix, who was malnourished and had a broken leg.

The founder of the rescue group turned to social media in an effort to save the dog, then being called Nik Nak, from lethal injection.

A temporary home in Cape Town was found and, after a week, it became permanent.

“He is fitting in quite nicely. He is very chilled and relaxed,” Kamilla Nurock told News24.

Nurock, a TV producer, said she named her new companion after Jerry’s nemesis in Seinfeld.

Social media also played a role in reuniting Kramer with his owner, Nik Glaser. Kramer disappeared while being cared for by an acquaintance when Glaser was on a trip to Seattle. For two months, Glaser, who has anxiety issues, searched Los Angeles for his therapy dog before he moved to Seattle at the end of January.

Soon after that he heard, through social media, about a similar dog who ended up in a Los Angeles shelter. It turned out to be Kramer and the two were reunited earlier this month:

(Top photo: Hugh Neff hugs George Costanza at the Yukon Quest finish line, by Erin Corneliussen / Fairbanks News-Miner)

National Dog Show this weekend

ohurleyThousands of dogs will take to the show rings this weekend in two all-breed, benched dog shows as the the Kennel Club of Philadelphia hosts the National Dog Show Presented by Purina, to be broadcast Thanksgiving on NBC.

John O’Hurley, of “Family Feud,” “Seinfeld” and “Dancing with the Stars” fame, hosts the Saturday show, which will be televised at noon on Thanksgiving.

A second show will be held Sunday, with more than 150 breeds competing for Best in Show, vendors, demonstrations and more.

Tickets for the show — held at the The Greater Philadelphia Expo Center,  just north of Valley Forge — are $12 for adults and $6 for children under 12, and are available at the door or online.

On both days, show visitors can watch more than 150  breeds compete in 11 show rings, view demonstrations and visit the dogs and owners backstage.

Unbenched, all-breed shows precede the Kennel Club of Philadelphia Dog Shows at the same site on Thursday and Friday.  Admission to those shows is $5 each.

You can learn more about the event on its website.