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Tag: shelter

Police in Ohio arrest woman they say was responsible for writing on, abandoning dog

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Police in Ohio have charged the woman they say was responsible for abandoning a dog in a park with the words “free” and “good home only” written on her in permanent marker.

Ross County authorities identified the woman as Kendra Stafford of Chillicothe. She faces charges of animal cruelty and animal abandonment, WSYX in Columbus reported.

The dog, a 6-month-old lab mix taken in by the Ross County Humane Society, was renamed Marvela and quickly adopted after being found in a crate in a local park.

Stafford’s expected to be arraigned in Chillicothe Municipal Court on June 8th.

Initial news reports offered no information on how police were able to track her down.

Court records show Stafford has also been accused of endangering her children. Three years ago, they were temporarily taken out of her custody.

(Photo: Ross County Humane Society)

Here’s the poop on the new royal dog


After this weekend’s royal wedding — which I was about as interested in as I am in, well, royal anything — there’s a new dog in the royal family: a once down and out Kentucky beagle named Guy.

I avoided coverage of the wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry like the plague, instantly flipping away from any channel that mentioned it, but in my efforts to stay on top of dog news, I couldn’t miss this.

Much like the marriage of the American actress and the prince, Guy’s story is “a total fairytale,” said Alison Preiss of Pet Valu, the Ontario pet store where Guy was adopted by Markle in 2015.

“Here is this dog that was in a shelter, nobody wanted him, and through this wonderful adoption he’s now living in a palace, running around with the royal family.”

Guy was a stray who had been picked up in the woods and held in a Kentucky shelter. It was a kill shelter, and Guy’s days were numbered when shelter staff contacted Dolores Doherty, who runs an Ontario-based rescue called A Dog’s Dream. The organization focuses on saving beagles scheduled to be euthanized.

Guy was shipped to Toronto and ended up, the day after his arrival, being featured at an adoption event at a Pet Valu store.

Among those who showed up at the store that day was Markle, who adopted him. Markle at the time was living in Toronto while her TV series, Suits, was being filmed there.

Doherty had never heard of Markle, but the next thing she knew Guy started showing up in Instagram posts.

New of Markle’s engagement to Prince Harry, Doherty said, was “just beyond my wildest imagination. How is that for a rags to riches story from a good old Kentucky beagle?”

guyandbogartIn November, Prince Harry’s communication secretary confirmed that Guy had moved to the UK and was living with Markle, The Guardian reported. Her other dog, Bogart, is believed was too old to make the journey is staying with Markle’s close friends.

Guy was photographed over the weekend, riding in the back seat with the queen.

Doherty said about 1,600 dogs have been adopted through her organization.

“The dogs that have come up here have really impacted a lot of lives. So there’s a lot of happy endings, but his certainly is the most outstanding.”

(Photos: At top: Markle’s dogs Guy and Bogart, by Meghan Markle / Instagram; lower Guy, spotted riding in the backseat with Queen Elizabeth II / Twitter)

Thief snatches trailer New Mexico rescue group used for adoption events

The theft of a trailer loaded with pet supplies Saturday means some dogs will wait a little longer for homes, and that an Albuquerque rescue group called the People’s Anti-Cruelty Association is going to have to rebuild.

The trailer was parked at a street corner where the nonprofit volunteer group holds adoption events every Saturday.

Sometime during the night, thieves hauled it away, along with the paperwork, leashes, pet food and other supplies inside, KOB in Albuquerque reported.

“When they stole our trailer it has greatly, greatly hindered our ability to (help animals) because if we can’t find it and its contents, we’re going to have to start all over,” said Arnielle Fernandez, a volunteer with PACA. “And that is very pricey.”

“Everything that was in the trailer was like crates that we set up for our dogs, our collars, our leashes, some dog food. Puppy pens, blankets, you know, towels – everything we need to function,” Fernandez said. “Ordinarily we, throughout the years, we have found permanent loving homes for thousands of dogs and cats.”

The group is now asking the public to keep an eye out for the trailer, which is white and has paw print decals, along with the PACA logo.

“Ask them to bring it back. That would be wonderful. It would be like Christmas in May,” Fernandez said.

While the group works to plan another event this weekend, Fernandez said it will be more difficult to pull off.

“Anybody that is in such a horrible state, on a personal level, that would do something like that to a non-profit rescue organization – they’re of very, very little character,” she said.

Blind dog and guide dog adopted together

A blind 12-year-old dachshund and his guide dog — a beefy looking pit bull named Blue Dozer — were adopted together from a shelter in Richmond.

The two were surrendered to the Richmond Animal Care and Control (RACC) shelter last Thursday after their owner became homeless.

ojanddozerThey were adopted – together – before the weekend was up, WWTB in Richmond reported.

RACC said it tried to help the owner of the dogs find other accommodations without putting them in the shelter, but there were no other options available.

The shelter promised the owner they would try to place the dachshund, named OJ, and Dozer, together in a good home.

The shelter said the animals were adopted by a family that will “keep them together forever.”

WWTB’s original report can be found here.

(Photo, from the Richmond Animal Care and Control Facebook page)

Concrete dogs in Barcelona send a message

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Twenty concrete dogs have been tethered to signs, lamposts, park benches and bicyle racks in Barcelona, Spain, as part of an effort to call attention to the problem of abandoned pets.

About 1,400 pets, including 760 dogs, were discarded on the streets of Barcelona last year — a 13 percent increase from 2016 — prompting the city council to launch the campaign.

Called “Dogs S.O.S.,” the campaign hopes to both raise awareness of the issue and help find homes for the 200 dogs awaiting adoption in city shelters.

The city contracted with the advertising firm Ogilvy Barcelona to place 20 life-sized concrete dog statues — cast from 3-D printed molds — around town, tethered to posts, poles and other urban structures.

Each statue includes an ID tag with a code that links to the City Council’s animal welfare site, where viewers can get information about dogs in need of homes.

Two shelter dogs — a 4-year-old mixed-breed named Neula and a 5-year-old American Staffordshire named Samó –served as models for the statues, ADWEEK reported.

“Neula and Samsó represent all the dogs that have been waiting a second chance,” said Jofre Banquells, creative director of Ogilvy Barcelona. “They both waited for at least a year at Barcelona’s animal shelter. Fortunately, Neula has been quickly adopted as soon as the campaign has been launched (on April 9).”

“Installing the dogs attached to lampposts, as if they were really abandoned, helps people visualize the situation,” Banquells said. “People don’t only see a dog, they see the problem. In addition, it gained media attention with no investment at all.”

The sculptures will stay on the streets another week, then be moved to other public spaces, such as libraries.

(Photo: Ogilvy Barcelona)

Western Kentucky weather dog passes away

Radar the Weather Dog — voted Bowling Green’s best television personality for nine years in a row — passed away Christmas morning at age 16.

Julie Milam, general manager at WNKY, broke the news to staff at the end of the station’s morning news program Tuesday, the Bowling Green Daily News reported.

“It’s a very sad and somber day at our station,” she said. “It is a great loss at our station for every employee and the community as a whole.”

A shelter pet, Radar was rescued from the Bowling Green-Warren County Humane Society in 2005. He was introduced as the station’s weather dog, appeared in forecasts with the meteorologist and lived at the station full time up until two years ago.

radarThe purebred border collie was a friendly dog who would roam about the station and greet visitors. When the time came for the weather report though, “he knew to be in that chair (and) be still,” Milam said. “He would bark on command.”

Radar gained additional fame at various community events, including his appearances at the annual Fur Ball that benefits the humane society.

Radar would go home with various members of the staff on weekends, and there were often arguments about who would get to take him home.

Eventually, he moved in full time with Marilyn Gardner, her two dogs and her foster kittens.

“He was a very loyal and sweet and funny character,” she said.

From 2008 to 2017, Radar was voted Bowling Green’s best television personality by Daily News and Amplifier readers as part of the annual Best of Bowling Green poll.

Radar’s adopted sister, SOKY, has taken over some of his station duties. She was also adopted from Logan County through the Bowling Green-Warren County Humane Society.

Lorri Hare, the shelter director, said Radar’s celebrity did wonders for promoting animal adoption.

“You can find great dogs here at the shelter every day,” she said. “He’ll be missed by a lot of us for sure. He lived a great life. A lot of people loved him.”

A public memorial is planned for February, according to WNKY.

The dog park is working wonders for Jinjja

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Jinjja’s transition from a dog destined for the butcher block to a trusting family pet continues to slowly but steadily move ahead — sometimes, so gradually that major breakthroughs probably go unnoticed, even by an observer as astute as I.

(“Stop observing me so astutely,” he’d probably say if he could talk. “And check that grammar. You’re nowhere near as astute as you think you are.”)

journeyAt the dog park, he still gets a little bit growly (but not aggressive) when dogs larger than he approach him too rambunctiously. He still spends some of the time going to a remote corner by himself.

But gradually (like everything else with this dog) he is coming to frolic with other dogs in the park, to approach a select few people and sometimes (with females of the human species) even let them pet him.

And last week, for the first time, he went a little farther than chasing and running with other dogs. He full on played with one, with hardly any of the growliness, with actual body contact, as in nearly wrestling, for at least a full minute.

DSC06712Her name is Moro, a Siberian Husky pup who is about Jinjja’s size — though that will change quickly.

With dogs smaller than he, Jinjja exhibits none of the growly behavior. And with Moro, for some reason, he was enamored — enamored like he is with any new dog entering the park. But this time, it lasted a while. He followed her everywhere she went.

DSC06747In addition to being the right size, Moro was the right temperament for him. She didn’t charge in and get in his face, didn’t attempt immediate wrestling. Instead she scurried under the bench for humans and observed what was going on, coming out after she felt comfortable, and taking her time getting to know other dogs.

She’s also soft and fluffy as a powder puff, and sweet smelling, though I’m guessing neither of those things matter to Jinjja.

In any event, it was the first time I’d seen him go into a play stance while off the leash — and proceed to play.

I’d have to say the dog park may be responsible for the biggest strides he has made in terms of socialization since he was rescued from a farm in South Korea where he was being raised as a farm animal to be slaughtered for his meat.

DSC06773We started going right after I was recovered enough from a surgery to check out the new dog park that opened just down the road — actually a little before it opened.

We go nearly every day now.

Jinjja, while he has grown totally comfortable with me, remains skittish around most people. Maybe upon a third meeting, maybe after you’d given him a treat or two, he’ll let you pet him, but he generally avoids the touch of humans until he gets to know them.

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Moro’s owner was an exception to that rule. She seems to hold a special appeal to Jinjja. He’ll approach her far quicker than any other human in the park, and make it clear he wants to be petted. Maybe it’s because he has met her three times now, or because she smells like Moro, or because she smells like other dogs from working at a doggie day care. Or maybe she just has a way with dogs.

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Connections like that — new dogs, new humans — go a long way in helping Jinjja with his transition.

His stay with another family during my hospitalization and recovery also led to improvements in his sociability. After living for two months with three other humans and two other dogs, I noticed a big change in him he came back home.

Last week there was a second breakthrough as well: Jinjja let my brother, who has known him for almost a year now, reach out and pet him, which is generally followed by “please, scratch away, especially right here in the butt region, which I will now shove toward you.”

He has never growled at humans, but he does generally growl, and raise his hackles, when a new dog, or even a large familiar one, attempts to play with him.

I’m not sure of the best way, training-wise, to address that, and I guess it’s more a matter of more time with more company. We hope to get back into the training class we had to drop out of due to illness.

But overall, his growliness has gone way down. (Unlike mine, which remains about the same.)

DSC06800A few days ago, Jinjja even met another Korean dog at the park — or at least one whose owner suspects he came from there. Toby, who he got from a shelter, appears to be a Sapsaree, a breed produced primarily if not exclusively in South Korea. (And yes, though he was way bigger, with waaaaay more hair, they got along fine.)

With Jinjja, the biggest factor of all, I suspect, has been simple time —
time spent being treated like a normal dog, as opposed to crated or chained as he was at the farm in Korea.

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It’s all about earning his trust, and sometimes he makes you work very hard for it.

So we’re spending lots more dog park time, and more me getting on the floor time (arduous task though it is) for that is when he really warms up.

And, dare I say it, he is, if not on the verge, at least getting very close to being a regular old happy go lucky dog.

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(Photos: By John Woestendiek / ohmidog!)